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Diabetes And Breast Cancer Treatment

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast cancer patients are nearly 50 percent more likely to die of any cause if they also have diabetes, according to a comprehensive review of research conducted by Johns Hopkins physicians. The findings, published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, suggest future research could focus on whether high levels of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes could play a role in promoting tumor growth. The researchers who conducted the review also found that diabetics tend to be diagnosed with later-stage breast cancers and to receive altered and potentially less effective treatment regimens. "When patients are faced with a diagnosis of breast cancer, which they see as an imminent threat to their lives, diabetes care often goes on the back burner," says study leader Kimberly S. Peairs, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "This research suggests we may need to proactively treat the diabetes as well as the cancer," she adds, noting that diabetes is a systemic disease that has many different effects on the body. Peairs and her team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of previously published research on breast cancer and diabetes, ultimately looking in depth at eight studies. In six of seven studies of breast cancer patients, preexisting diabetes was associated with significantly higher long-term all-cause mortality. Diabetes and cancer are major causes of illness and death worldwide. In 2007, in the United States alone, roughly 24 million people had diabetes (about 8 percent of the population) and 2.5 million were survivors of breast cancer. Diabetics are known to have a higher risk of breast cancer, Peairs says. Peairs says her research suggests that diabetics diagnosed with breast cancer Continue reading >>

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This upcoming Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day , a worldwide observance the first Sunday in June, dedicated to "showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful and productive." We almost hate to mention it, but there is some question about a possible link between cancer and diabetes and there are many people out there dealing with both. There's no real proof that one causes the other, yet there are a lot of studies linking the two . Results suggest that anywhere from 8 to 18% of people with cancer also have diabetes. One recent study published in Diabetes Care showed that 16 out of every 100 men with diabetes and 17 out of every 100 women with diabetes said they had cancer, compared to just 7 out of 100 men and 10 out of 100 women without diabetes. So maybe there is some connection...? We're not pointing this out to scare anybody, but rather to pay homage to the folks who are dealing with both illnesses. Despite the stats cited, there's hardly any available literature on treating this combination. One of the few things we found was a 2006 Diabetes Spectrum article by Helen Psarakis, a diabetes nurse practitioner at Yale New Haven Hospital. She states that cancer patients who are on glucocorticoids a steroid used in short term, high-dose chemo treatments often suffer with high blood sugar. In fact, patients at risk for diabetes who begin taking glucocorticoids during cancer treatment are often quickly diagnosed with diabetes too. Insulin is recommended to treat steroid-induced blood sugar, as patients "may require two to three times their usual dose(s) of insulin." Woah. Helen points out a f Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Diabetes Treatment And Breast Cancer Prognosis

Diabetes, Diabetes Treatment And Breast Cancer Prognosis

Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis Beth Virnig , Michael Hendryx , Sijin Wen , Rowan Chelebowski , Chu Chen , Tomas Rohan , Lesley Tinker , Jean Wactawski-Wende , Lawrence Lessin , and Karen Margolis Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University, 1025 E. 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at HarborUniversity of California, Los Angeles, USA. Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA Juhua Luo, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University, 1025 E. 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA; The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Breast Cancer Res Treat See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Womens Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95 % CI 1.061.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specif Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Breast Cancer Subtypes

Diabetes And Breast Cancer Subtypes

Affiliations Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation Department of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital THG, Aarhus, Denmark Affiliation Department of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital THG, Aarhus, Denmark Affiliation Division of Pharmacoepidemiology & Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands Affiliation Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation Division of Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland Affiliation Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Affiliation Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Affiliation Clinical Institute, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Affiliations Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicine Linked To Better Outcomes In Diabetics With Her2-positive, Hormone-receptor-positive Breast Cancer

Diabetes Medicine Linked To Better Outcomes In Diabetics With Her2-positive, Hormone-receptor-positive Breast Cancer

A number of studies have suggested a link between diabetes, diabetes medicines, and breast cancer risk. Research strongly suggests that women diagnosed with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who aren’t diabetic. Other research suggests that diabetic women taking the medicine metformin (brand names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet), which is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, have a lower-than-average risk of breast cancer. An analysis of data from the ALTTO study suggests that diabetic women treated with metformin who have been diagnosed with HER2-positive, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer have better outcomes, including overall survival, than similar women who were not treated with metformin. The study was published online on March 13, 2017 by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Read “Impact of Diabetes, Insulin, and Metformin Use on the Outcome of Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Primary Breast Cancer: Analysis From the ALTTO Phase III Randomized Trial.” Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board members Martine Piccart-Gebhart, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of oncology at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles and Julie Gralow, M.D., associate professor of medical oncology at the University of Washington and director of breast medical oncology at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance are two authors of the study. In the ALTTO trial, 8,381 women from 44 countries diagnosed with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer that had been surgically removed were randomly assigned to get one of four anti-HER2 targeted therapy treatments for a year after surgery: Herceptin alone Tykerb alone Herceptin for 12 weeks, a 6-week break, then 34 weeks of Tykerb Herceptin and Tykerb given at the same Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast cancer can affect men as well as women Breast cancer is a common form of cancer - the most common cancer in women - that develops inside the tissue of the breast. This sectionexplains how breast cancer, which can also occur in men, is linked to diabetes in addition to what the commonrisk factors and symptoms of breast cancer are and how the disease is treated. Breast cancer refers to cancer - the uncontrollable growth and spread of new cells - that originates from breast tissue. As cancer can develop in different parts of the breast, there are various different types of breast cancer. Some remain inside the breast and are known as non-invasive breast cancers (or carcinoma in situ), while most have the ability to spread outside the breast and are commonly referred to as invasive breast cancer. The most common type of non-invasive cancer is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or cancer found in the milk ducts of the breast. The most common form of breast cancer is invasive ductal breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the breast ducts. It accounts for around 80% of all cases of breast cancer. Other less common types of breast cancer include: Invasive lobular breast cancer - develops in the inner lining of the milk-producing glands of the breast (lobules) Inflammatory breast cancer - a rare and very aggressive cancer in which affected cells block lymph vessels in the skin of the breast, causing it to swell Paget's disease of the breast - an infiltrating cancer of the cells that line that nipple Secondary or metastatic breast cancer - cancer that spreads from the breast to other parts of the body, usually through the bloodstream or the lymph nodes (small glands that filter bacteria) In the UK, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the secon Continue reading >>

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and of the more than 13 million Americans who have or have had cancer, eight to 18 percent also have diabetes. It’s an eye-opening statistic and a reminder about why it’s important to be proactive about our overall health and well-being during and after cancer treatment. “Because of the huge link between insulin resistance and cancer, it is critically important for people who have diabetes to manage their blood glucose during cancer treatment,” adds Brooke McIntyre, a clinical oncology dietitian and diabetes program coordinator at CTCA in Tulsa. McIntyre recommends the following tips to help manage cancer and diabetes: Never eat a “naked” carbohydrate. Funny statement, but people remember it! Rather than eating only an apple, eat a handful of nuts or one to two tablespoons of nut butter too. This helps decrease the rise in blood sugar and makes you feel more satisfied. Eat fewer carbohydrates. Decreasing carbohydrate intake not only lowers blood sugar, but can also help lower blood pressure. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. Eating cancer-fighting foods high in fiber can help regulate blood sugar. Foods to add to your diet include: Asian pears, raspberries, blackberries, bananas, blueberries, beans, broccoli, spinach, lentils, peas, corn, flax seeds and whole-grain breads or crackers. Exercise regularly. The American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Diabetes Association recommend 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week to lower risk of cancer recurrence. Add healthy fats to your diet. Say “no” to doughnuts and fried chicken and “hello” to healthy fats such as avocado, salmon and walnuts. Good fats contain antioxidants, help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and feel Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes Or Heart Disease More Likely To Die, Study Finds

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes Or Heart Disease More Likely To Die, Study Finds

Women with breast cancer who have had diabetes for a long time or a cardiovascular disease are more likely to die than those without the conditions, a study reports. The finding applied to deaths from all causes , not just deaths from breast cancer. Researchers published their study, titled The Impact of Diabetes on Breast Cancer Treatments and Outcomes: A Population-Based Study , in the journal Diabetes Care . A third of breast cancer patients have diabetes. Studies show they have a 40 percent higher risk of death after developing breast cancer than women without diabetes. There may be multiple reasons for this. For example, research has shown that women with diabetes have lower breast cancer screening rates and more advanced cases of cancer than women without diabetes. In addition, evidence indicates that women with diabetes and other diseases receive less aggressive cancer treatments, especially chemotherapy . Interestingly, breast cancer studies have not taken into account the additional presence of cardiovascular disease. Doctors know certain chemotherapy regimens can affect the heart, so some may opt for more conservative chemotherapy in patients with a cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular risk is higher in women with diabetes, but its unclear how the combination of the two affects doctors breast cancer treatment decisions. As an example, while radiotherapy is an important breast cancer treatment, in some cases it can cause long-term heart toxicity. This means doctors may want to avoid it in women with diabetes who also have a cardiovascular disease. While studies have explored the association between diabetes and death in women with breast cancer, its been unclear how treatment differences factor in, particularly when there are additional conditions, such as c Continue reading >>

Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-stage Breast Cancer

Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-stage Breast Cancer

Home Research News Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer Study Suggests Link Between Diabetes, More Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer Several previous studies have found that women diagnosed with diabetes were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who arent diabetic. Now a Canadian study suggests that if diabetic women are diagnosed with breast cancer, it is more likely to be advanced-stage disease. The study was published in the March 2015 issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. Read the abstract of The association between diabetes and breast cancer stage at diagnosis: a population-based study. The researchers looked at the medical records of 38,407 women from Ontario, Canada, who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 2007 and 2012; 6,115 (15.9%) of the women were diabetic. The women were 20 to 105 years old. The researchers found that women with diabetes were: 14% more likely to have stage II breast cancer 21% more likely to have stage III breast cancer 16% more likely to have stage IV breast cancer rather than stage I breast cancer at diagnosis. These differences in stage at diagnosis were statistically significant, which means theyre likely because the women had diabetes rather than just due to chance. Compared to women who didnt have diabetes, women with diabetes also: had a higher risk of the cancer spreading to the lymph nodes The researchers suggested that breast cancer screening may need to be more aggressive for women with diabetes so that if any cancer develops it is found at an earlier stage. A more aggressive screening plan may include screenings every 6 to 12 months -- possibly an annual mammogram and an annual breast MRI or ultrasound. Its not clear why women with diabetes may have a higher risk Continue reading >>

Study Explores Breast Cancer Outcomes And Treatment In Women Who Have Diabetes

Study Explores Breast Cancer Outcomes And Treatment In Women Who Have Diabetes

Home / Specialties / Oncology / Study Explores Breast Cancer Outcomes and Treatment in Women Who Have Diabetes Study Explores Breast Cancer Outcomes and Treatment in Women Who Have Diabetes Females with breast cancer and diabetes have poorer prognosis than those with breast cancer without diabetes, but why? Females with breast cancer who have pre-existing diabetes have a higher risk for all-cause mortality that has long-lasting effects compared to females who do not have pre-existing diabetes. The link between diabetes and breast cancer is not known, however. Is all-mortality dependent on lack of chemotherapeutic treatment? Or, is it contingent upon clinical or biological interaction between the two diseases? In hopes of answering one of those questions, researchers in Canada completed a population-based study from a retrospective cohort. Iliana Lega and colleagues investigated whether diagnosis of diabetes has an impact on following guideline-based chemotherapeutic regimens or radiation therapy for treatment of breast cancer and whether those females with breast cancer and diabetes have a worse all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality than their counterparts without diabetes. For the completion of the retrospective cohort, investigators utilized the population-based health databases, which cover over 12 million residents from Ontario, Canada. Those females who were over the age of 20 and who had diagnosis of breast cancer stages I, II and III were included in the study, only if they underwent a lumpectomy or mastectomy within 6 months to a year following their diagnosis. Females with a history of prior cancers (not including nonmelanoma skin cancers) and individuals residing in long-term care facilities were excluded. Diabetes diagnosis was determined through he Continue reading >>

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy and Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis Denise Soltow Hershey , PhD, RN, FNP-BC1 and Sarah Hession 2 1College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA 2Center for Statistical Training and Consulting, Michigan State University, MI, USA Corresponding author: Denise Soltow Hershey, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA Tel: (517) 432-8294 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2017 Feb 24; Accepted 2017 Mar 26. Copyright : 2017 Ann & Joshua Medical Publishing Co. Ltd This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Individuals with diabetes who develop cancer have a worse 5-year overall survival rate and are more likely to develop an infection and/or be hospitalized when compared to those without diabetes. Patients with diabetes and cancer receiving chemotherapy have an increased risk for developing glycemic issues. The relationship between chemotherapy and glycemic control is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between glycemic control, symptoms, physical and mental function, development of adverse events, and chemotherapy reductions or stoppages in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer. A prospective 12-week longitudinal cohort study recruited 24 adults with T2D, solid tumor cancer, or lymphoma receiving outpatient intravenous chemotherapy. Eighteen individuals completed baseline data and were included in the analysis. Continue reading >>

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-Known Connection between Diabetes and Breast Cancer In a hurry? Click here to read the Article Summary... Diabetes, especially lifestyle and diet-related Type 2 Diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. And sadly not just for adults, but for children and teens as well. This is not breaking news. Still, the statistics can be scary. Close to 10% of the U.S population have been diagnosed with the disease and an estimated additional8.1 million Americans went undiagnosed in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This includes close to 4,000 new cases of Childhood Type 2 Diabetes each year (something that was unheard of just 15 years ago). And these statistics do not even include the 40% of Americans who, according to the CDC, may be deemed pre-diabetic. The Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer Is Real A study of close to one million people registered with the national Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS) in Australia who were diagnosed between the years 1997 to 2008 discovered that there were high correlations was between Type 2 Diabetes and cancer. Specifically, these include pancreatic, liver, endometrium, kidney, thyroid and gallbladder cancer as well as certain kinds of leukemia. A 2014 report by the World Journal of Diabetes found that high correlationalso existed between Type 2 Diabetes and breast cancer as well. Increasing rates of both diabetes and cancer over the last decade has led scientists to try to determine the specific chemical and biological connections between the two diseases. For years, conventional wisdom stated that obesity was the common cause. Now more evidence points to factors related to insulin instead. There are a few connections between insulin levels and cancer. First of all, studies have shown that tu Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

How To Manage Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

Between 8% and 18% of cancer patients have diabetes, a chronic condition that impacts the ability to regulate blood sugar levels. And, for many patients, diabetes management takes a backseat to cancer treatment. But managing your blood sugar levels can help your overall health. We spoke with Erma Levy, a research dietitian at MD Anderson, about what cancer patients with diabetes should know. Can cancer treatment affect blood sugar levels? Radiation therapy, steroids and some types of chemotherapy may impact your blood sugar levels. And uncontrolled high blood sugar can lead to dehydration, which is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy. Taking extra care to manage your blood sugar levels can help you stay hydrated and feel better during treatment. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels also can have a negative impact on your other organs. Monitoring your blood sugar levels can help keep them healthy and strong during cancer treatment. What can cancer patients with diabetes do to improve their health? If you have Type II diabetes or pre-diabetes (a high risk for developing diabetes), try to manage it through your diet. As your diet allows, focus on a healthy eating plan that’s rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains and low in fat and calories. You can help keep your blood sugar level in a safe range by ensuring there’s a balance of these foods in your diet throughout the day. If you’re finding that it’s difficult to eat healthy foods, talk to your doctor or schedule an appointment with a dietitian to find ways to get these foods into your diet. If you’re an MD Anderson patient, your doctor or nurse can refer you to an MD Anderson dietitian. If you have energy, exercise when possible. This can help you maintain a healthy weight, which plays a key part in controll Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

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