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Diabetes And Bread

Beer Bread

Beer Bread

No yeast and no kneading makes this a super easy homemade bread. Easy to prepare. Low fat; Low cholesterol. 3 cups all purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 12 oz. can lite beer Preheat oven to 375ºF. Spray a 9 X 5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Combine all ingredients and mix well. Press dough into pan; bake 55 to 60 minutes Calories: 184 Fat: .5g Carbohydrates: 37g Sodium: 392mg Fiber: 1g Protein: 5g Cholesterol: 0mg Continue reading >>

Is Ezekiel Bread Good For People With Diabetes?

Is Ezekiel Bread Good For People With Diabetes?

Ezekiel bread, which was indeed named after a bible verse, has become popular for the way it offers unique nutrition as well as for the way it makes people feel as a low-glycemic bread option. Most bread is made of flour and sandwich bread often contains added sugar. For many, bread fuels issues like insulin resistance and constipation. Ezekiel bread is unique because it contains no flour and is made of organic sprouted whole grains like wheat, barley, millet, oats, and corn. Some Ezekiel bread choices contains sprouted legumes. Benefits of Sprouted Grains While Ezekiel bread does raise blood sugar at 15 grams of carbohydrate per slice, and it does contain gluten, there are some benefits to eating sprouted grain bread for those who are already eating bread that may be worth knowing. Sprouting a grain or legume entails soaking in water so seeds germinate. This creates more nutrients for consumption as well as fewer anti-nutrients which are present in many grains to discourage animals from eating them. It sounds funny but, just as a snake may bite and a porcupine has quills, most plants contain toxic substances to avoid being eaten. It simply has to do with nature finding a way to survive and reproduce. Even after we cook our grains, some still leave behind some anti-nutrients. Sprouting breaks down enzyme inhibitors and leaves something that is easier to digest and enables your body to better absorb nutrients. Ezekiel bread (the 7 Sprouted Grains one) has 15 grams of carbohydrates per slice as well as 80 grams potassium, 3 grams of fiber, 1 gram of sugar, and 4 grams of protein. It contains all 9 of the essential amino acids. Who Can Eat it and How to Eat it? It depends. I’m not personally recommending this to people unless they are already managing blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly

Diabetic Friendly

Certified, Safe and Tasty! Whether you're diabetic or looking to lose weight, it doesn't mean you need to cut the carbs you love out of your diet. It just means that you need to be able to trust that the food you buy and the companies that make them have your best interest in mind. Food for Life specially makes an assortment of low-glycemic foods that have been awarded the Diabetic Friendly Seal by the International Government Accredited Organization, The Glycemic Research Institute. This means all our offerings can help you: Lower your blood sugar levels Reduce "highs" and "lows" Reduce weight Reduce risk of heart disease Control Type I and II Diabetes, hypoglycemia and hypertension Reduce the incidence of Type II diabetes Above and beyond the health benefits of a low-glycemic diet, and meeting the strict standards of the Seal, we take more precaution and all the extra care and steps to provide you with the best tasting and most nutritious low-glycemic products out there. The Food For Life Low Glycemic & Diabetic Friendly Product Difference We use only use freshly sprouted certified organic whole grains and seeds, which helps your body digest more nutrients naturally found in grains. Our products are all kosher. We use absolutely no flour. Studies have shown that grinding grains into flour increases the surface area upon which enzymes in the body can work to more quickly convert starch into glucose. We don't use any genetically modified organisms (GMO's) We don't use refined sugars. When sugar is refined and processed there are many harmful ingredients that are added to the sugar as a result. Instead, we use malted barley, a natural sweetener produced from sprouted barley, which is basically a carbohydrate comprised mostly of complex carbohydrates rather than the "suga Continue reading >>

Whole Wheat Pita Bread

Whole Wheat Pita Bread

For low sodium diets, omit the salt. Ingredients 1 (1/4-ounce) package active dry yeast or 2 1/2 teaspoons 1 teaspoon honey (needed for yeast action) 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water (110 to 115°F / 45°C) water 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup whole wheat flour 1 teaspoon salt Directions Preheat oven to 375°F. Combine the flours and salt in a large mixing bowl. Make a well; pour yeast mixture into center and stir until dough can be gathered into a ball. Knead dough floured board until smooth. Place dough in a large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover with a damp towel and place in a dry, draft-free place until dough has doubled, 1 to 2 hours. Punch down dough; place on lightly floured board. Divide dough into 12 equal pieces. Shape into circles and place on nonstick baking sheets. Allow to rest, covered with damp towel for 30 minutes. On lightly floured surface, roll out each piece of dough to a circle, about 5-inches in diameter. Place on baking sheets; let stand about 30 minutes. Bake on middle rack of preheated 500°F (250°C) oven for 5 minutes. Remove pitas from baking sheets and let cool on rack. Store in airtight container in refrigerator. To serve, reheat wrapped in aluminum foil at 350°F (175°C) for 10 minutes. Food Exchanges: 1 1/2 bread/Starch Nutritional Info (per serving): Makes 12 Servings Calories: 99 Protein: 3g Fat: 0g Cholesterol: 21mg Recipe provided courtesy of The Art of Cooking for the Diabetic by Mary Abbott Hess, R.D., M.S. Continue reading >>

Chasing The Perfect Bread For A Diabetic Diet

Chasing The Perfect Bread For A Diabetic Diet

Since the day I learned that carbohydrates were the culprit for raising blood sugar, I have been trying to find a way to keep eating them. The reason? I love carbohydrates. There are diets that have little or no bread, fruits, or vegetables, and some people with diabetes use them. It would be simple to eliminate most carbs from your life and live on protein and fats. But I will not do it. Keeping carbohydrates in my eating plan is a challenge, but it is worth it to me. The thought of living without them makes the future seem gray and empty. Carbs add color to my life. Since I made this decision, I have been looking for the best carbs. There is plenty of advice for people with diabetes, as well as people who just want to lose weight, about which carbohydrates to eat. So why have I found this so difficult? One problem is that the glycemic index, which ranks foods according to their impact on blood sugar, is not absolute. What fuels the changes in advice? For one thing, research has uncovered the vital importance of fiber, its impact on carbohydrate digestion, and the amazing way it helps control blood sugar. The big news today is that vegetable fiber encourages the growth of good bacteria. Where do we find all of this wonderful fiber? It comes from carbohydrates. Hurrah! Another problem with deciding what to eat is conflicting information. The American Diabetes Association and American Heart Association often agree on what is best, targeting calories as an important area of focus. Needless to say, they both advise that we limit high-calorie carbohydrates like desserts. But they encourage including wheat in your diet. Whole wheat is best, they say. But trying to find a good whole wheat bread turns out to be tricky, since bread labels can be confusing. A dismaying number of Continue reading >>

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics should avoid white bread and anything else made with white flour because it can raise their blood sugar levels quickly. White flour and glucose, or pure sugar, are used to rank foods according to how fast they raise blood glucose. When a diabetic eats white bread, it is just like eating sugar. Whole Grains Are Best Finding the glycemic index of foods containing carbohydrates is a good way to control your diet and blood sugar level. Bread that is 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel is best because of its low glycemic level. Diabetics should be very careful to choose only bread that is 100 percent whole-wheat. If the label says, "Wheat Bread," the bread could contain a high content of white flour. It is best to avoid oat bread and other breads as well because they often contain white flour, which should always be treated like pure sugar when you have diabetes. Although some other breads and foods that are a lot like bread may look darker, this does not mean that they are whole-wheat products. Some bagels look like they are stone-ground whole-wheat, but they could actually be made with mostly white flour. Crackers may also look like they have wheat in them, and they might be partially made from whole wheat. This does not make them safe for diabetics to eat, however, because they will likely cause a spike in their glucose levels. Whole-wheat bread, rye, and pita breads that are not made from 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel are considered by the American Diabetes Association to be medium GI foods. Other Foods to Avoid There are many other bread products full of carbohydrates that cause spikes in blood sugar. They have a high glycemic index and include mashed potatoes, corn flakes, instant oatmeal, puffed rice, bran flakes, and Continue reading >>

I Love Bread – Don’t You?

I Love Bread – Don’t You?

Evening people. I’m just finishing up some writing work and preparing for a podcast with Diabetics Doing Things tomorrow at 9 am. I can’t wait to get on and share my story with 1000s of others. Anyway, about today. I had an awesome post workout feed of crunchy fresh sourdough, grilled bacon, runny eggs and a slab of real butter spread over. (Hungry yet?) I eyeballed the nutrition of the meal to be in and around 680kcals. 67g Carbs 43g Protein 27g Fat Having written my fair share of nutrition programs and weighted more food than I care to imagine, my figures are always pretty accurate. Blood Glucose Pre-meal: 9.0 mm0l/L Activity Status: 1 Hour Post strength training (looks like those stress hormones haven’t tapered off yet! as I was 6.0mmol/L at the start of training) Insulin Dosing Strategy: 6 Units Novorapid after the first bite. I dosed slightly less insulin in comparison to what I would normally need on a non-training training. Here’s why, Post training stress hormones like Cortisol and Adrenaline inevitably wear off and the glucose disposal effects of strength training kick in- increasing the risk of hypoglycemia. The fat content of the meal was relatively high, due to avocado, egg yolks and bacon. High levels of fat slow the release of carbohydrate and amino acids into my blood resulting in a slower increase in blood glucose compared to eating the bread (carbohydrate) alone. Always keep that in mind! Blood Glucose 3 hours post meal: 6.5 mmol/L (NAILED IT) Anyway enough talk about insulin and diabetes for the day… Let’s talk about bread. I love bread! A no nonsense, easy to prepare carb source that stacks well with pretty much any protein source. Perfect performance and recovery fuel, especially in summer weather. Never be afraid to adapt your food sourc Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Monkey Bread

Diabetic Friendly Monkey Bread

Introduction: Diabetic Friendly Monkey Bread I have always adored Monkey Bread since my mom made it for me and my brother when we were kids. As I got older, I have had to abstain myself from that decadent and sugar laden sweet due to Diabetes. But thanks to Splenda products I can once again eat one of my favorite deserts!!! SO lets get down to the brass tacks shall we? Here is how you make it! Step 1: The Ingredients 3/4 cup of Spleda granulated baking sugar 2 teaspoons of cinamon 4 cans of Pillsbury refrigerated Buttermilk biscuits 1/2 cup of butter (melted) 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons of Spleda Brown sugar mix 1 bundt pan If you can use real sugar, the granulated sugar can be the same amount but the Splenda brown sugar is a bit different, so if you want to use regular brown sugar, you want to use 3/4 cup of packed brown sugar. I included a conversion chart, just in case. Step 2: Time to Assemble the Monkey Bread Preheat the oven to 350. Mix the granulated Splenda and cinnamon in a large Ziploc bag. Cut each of the biscuits into quarters. Shake the quarters into the bag to coat (You can use a lovely assistant like I did) after witch but the coated pieces into a greased bundt pan. Step 3: Almost Done.... Once you have coated all the pieces, mix the melted butter and the Splenda brown sugar, then pour it over the biscuit pieces. Bake it for 40 to 45 minutes or until it's golden brown. Step 4: Yummy Monkey Bread Goodness!!! Once it's done, flip it over onto a plate! It tastes best when warm and the sugar is ooey and gooey and wonderful! The outside is caramelized and the inside is soft and delicious. Continue reading >>

Sprouted Diabetic Lifestyles Low Glycemic Bread

Sprouted Diabetic Lifestyles Low Glycemic Bread

In their daily life, it's very important for diabetics to know the insulin response of a food in order to predict their blood sugar response. "Diabetic Lifestyles Bread", a 100% Sprouted Whole Grain recipe, was submitted for testing to the Glycemic Research Institute in Washington, D.C. and was clinically proven to be Low Glycemic with a Low Glycemic Load when fed to diabetics. Actual clinical results show a Glycemic Index of 5.0 on the glucose scale (0-100) and Glycemic Load of 0.9 per serving. Additionally, diabetics experienced a reduction in blood glucose by the end of the testing period! Made with organic sprouted wheat, and sweetened only with organic fruit, this delicious recipe contains no refined sugars, no added oil, no gmo's, and no flour. We're confident that you'll enjoy this unique bread as part of your healthy lifestyle. Ingredients: Sprouted Organic Whole Wheat Berries, Filtered Water, Wheat Gluten, Organic Dates, Cultured Wheat, Organic Raisins, Sea Salt, Fresh Yeast, Sunflower Lecithin Nutrition Facts: Serving Size: 1 Slice Calories: 80 Fat: 0g Protein: 5g Dietary Fiber: 2g Carbohydrates: 15g Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Bread consumption can often hinder the control of blood glucose in diabetics. Many types of bread are laden with carbohydrates and sugar causing blood glucose to rise. However, for those that refuse to surrender their daily bread, there are a few low carbohydrate breads that can contribute to fiber content in the diet and will not drastically raise blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends high fiber breads made from whole grains to keep blood glucose from spiking and to maintain optimal digestive health. As always, it is imperative to consult with a licensed dietitian familiar with diabetes before attempting to drastically alter any diet for a medical condition. Video of the Day Pumpernickel bread is a dark brown color that is low on the glycemic index. For 1 one ounce slice, pumpernickel scores a 51 with 1 g of fat and 15 g of carbohydrate. Pumpernickel traces its origins to Germany, and was traditionally made to feed the hungry. The German Food Guide describes pumpernickel as a whole grain bread made from rye flour and coarse rye meal that, in America, has the addition of molasses or sour mix for sourdough adding to its signature color, aroma and taste. Sourdough is a white bread that is low on the glycemic index. For a 1-oz. slice, sourdough scores a 52 with 1 g g of fat and 20 g of carbohydrate. Sourdough is a rather lean dough that obtains much of its robust flavor and texture from the sour mix that ferments over time adding leavening as well as flavor. While it is a white dough, the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Center for Integrative Medicine's Glycemic Food Index ranks sourdough lower than most in scoring making it a favorable option for diabetics. Wholegrain vs. Stoneground Wheat Wholegrain wheat provides a considerable Continue reading >>

Bread Alternatives

Bread Alternatives

Tweet Bread is relatively high in carbohydrate and calories so some people with diabetes may benefit from using alternatives to bread. Another reason for looking to alternatives is to reduce exposure to gluten which may be necessity for people with coeliac disease. In this guide, we break down bread substitutes into their uses, covering: Bread wrap alternatives Bread roll alternatives Sliced bread alternatives Bread wrap alternatives If you’re looking for a bread alternative that will serve as a wrap, there are a few options. Lettuce wraps A good substitute for pita bread or tortilla wraps is lettuce. Use the large outer leaves to ensure you have a large enough area to hold the filling. Lettuce leaves are gluten free, make for a very low carb and low calorie option and help towards reaching or exceeding the 5 portions of fruit and vegetables daily target. Lettuce leaves may be more flimsy than bread or tortillas so whilst they hold a filling, they are clearly not a close match for bread in terms of taste or texture. Cabbage leaves can be also used as an alternative to lettuce. North Staffordshire oatcake North Staffordshire oatcakes are essentially oat pancakes and not to be confused with Scottish oatcakes which are smaller and biscuit like. If you’re looking for a starchier alternative to lettuce wraps that has a lower impact of blood glucose levels than bread, then North Staffs oatcakes could be for you. Whilst wholemeal pitta bread has around 45g of carbohydrate per 100g, North Staffordshire oatcakes have 30g of carbs per 100g. North Staffs oatcakes are less heavy than pitta bread and can be rolled with a filling of your choice. Rice paper Rice paper is an alternative to bread wraps but is relatively high in carbohydrate so we wouldn’t recommend using rice pape Continue reading >>

Baffled By Bread?

Baffled By Bread?

We all love a slice of bread, but with so many types and brands out there, and a whole lot of nutritional myths to go with them, it can all be a bit confusing. There's wholemeal, white, sourdough, grain - just to name a few. But what does it all mean, and which one is actually better for you? When it comes to eating bread ask yourself three things: What benefit will this have on my health? Will this keep me full until my next meal? And how much should I be eating? If you have diabetes you also need to ask yourself: How will this affect my blood glucose levels? But this still doesn't tell you which type of bread is best for you. Well Diabetes Queensland has done the hard work for you. *White bread: * We all grew up eating it and it's probably one of the most popular items at your supermarket - but when it comes to nutritional value, you can generally do a lot better than your average slice of white bread. It doesn't have the same amount of fibre or provide you with the same sustained energy of other low GI breads but brands with added fibre and low GI varieties are also available. * Wholemeal bread: * This is where things start to get tricky because not all brown breads are created equally. Bran and wheat-germ is removed during the baking process of most packaged wholemeal breads. While this removes some of its nutritional value, it will still contain more fibre than white bread. To get the most nutrition out of your wholemeal bread try and find a loaf that actually contains wholemeal flour. * Multi-grain bread:* In theory multigrain bread sounds better for your health, but did you know 'multigrain' is simply white bread with multiple types of grain in the loaf? But the number of grains in a loaf of bread isn't that important if the grains in the bread are refined and ha Continue reading >>

Bread And Diabetes

Bread And Diabetes

Gone are the days when all you can find in your supermarket is white, ready-sliced bread. There are so many different types of breads available now, so your choice really is only limited by your imagination. And, if you’ve got diabetes, you may also want to think about other factors, such as carbohydrate content and how much fat and how many calories are in the bread you’re eating. Bread is a source ofcarbohydrate. During digestion, carbohydrate is broken down into glucose, which is used by the cells of the body as their main source of energy. There are two types of carbohydrate: starchy carbohydrates and sugars. Bread falls into the starchy carbohydrate category. All carbohydrates affect blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate requirements vary between individuals and depend on age, gender, weight and physical activity. TheReference Intake (RI)of carbohydrate is 230g for women and 300g for men. These figures are just a guide and are based on the requirements of an average woman and man. Depending on your nutritional goals, you may require less. Most supermarkets and local markets contain different types of bread. Here’s what you need to know next time you’re choosing a loaf. White bread, tiger bread, pumpernickel bread, granary bread, flat bread, seeded and pitta bread Serve with: lean chicken, ham, turkey or beef plus chopped tomatoes, grated carrot and cucumber egg and cress, with a little reduced-fat mayo and black pepper cottage cheese mixed with salsa and sweetcorn reduced-fat cheddar with grated carrot and sultanas Tabasco sauce, horseradish, mustard and chili sauce for a real fiery kick in jazzed-up sandwiches. Per slice: White: 79Kcal – 16.6g carbs – 0.6g fat Tiger: 97Kcal – 17g carbs – 0.83g fat Granary: 85Kcal – 17g carbs – 0.8g fat Pumpernicke Continue reading >>

Glycaemic Responses To Different Types Of Bread In Insulin-dependent Diabetic Subjects (iddm): Studies At Constant Insulinaemia.

Glycaemic Responses To Different Types Of Bread In Insulin-dependent Diabetic Subjects (iddm): Studies At Constant Insulinaemia.

Abstract To study the glycaemic effect of various Danish bread types in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects (IDDM) we looked at the incremental blood glucose areas after isocaloric meals of grained wholemeal rye bread, wholemeal bread (graham bread) and white bread in seven C-peptide negative diabetic subjects. Furthermore, we evaluated the glycaemic potency of dried fruits by exchanging 40 per cent of the starch of grained wholemeal rye bread as dried figs. Prior to the meal intake the patients had attained normoglycaemia and isoinsulinaemia by means of the artificial pancreas. The four test meals containing 50 g of available carbohydrate were taken in random order. The postprandial blood glucose response areas after whole-meal bread (1037 +/- 113 mM X 180 min) and white bread (1021 +/- 100 mM X 180 min) were significantly higher than that to grained wholemeal rye bread (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min, P less than 0.05). Exchange of 40 per cent of the complex carbohydrate as grained wholemeal rye bread with simple sugars, such as figs, had no influence on the blood glucose response (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min vs. 766 +/- 56 mM X 180 min). Constant and identical serum-free insulin levels at 30 mU/l and similar amounts of glucose lost in the urine were found after the four test meals. In conclusion, the difference in extraction rate of wheat in the form of white flour (0, 7) and wholemeal flour (1, 0) was not reflected in the glycaemic responses in IDDM subjects. Grained wholemeal rye bread is a fibre-rich, cheap nutrient which elicits a significantly lower glycaemic response compared to wholemeal and white bread and can be recommended to diabetic subjects. Continue reading >>

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