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Diabetes And Bodybuilding

Bodybuilding The Diabetic Way

Bodybuilding The Diabetic Way

As any bodybuilder or fitness enthusiast knows, controlling what What goes into your body and what goes on inside of it is essential for optimal performance and results. But for ALLMAX Ambassador Steven Mott, going the extra mile in terms of training and nutrition is a necessity not an option. Mott was diagnosed with Type I diabetes just a few days before his 15th birthday and has been adapting his lifestyle to the condition ever since. While diabetes is not a death sentence, it does take constant vigilance and dedication to stay on top of it. “I have to give myself insulin injections at meal times and correction doses as needed,” Mott explains. “I also have long-acting insulin that I have to take before bedtime to help control my blood glucose levels throughout the day.” Mott’s bodybuilding pursuits don’t make things any easier. Maintaining stable blood sugar levels during exercise is very important as well. Fluctuations in blood sugar levels can ruin an exercise session and be dangerous. Unfortunately, these changes can occur without warning. “There are times I can be just getting to the gym, or during training and I start to feel very dizzy and lightheaded,” Mott says. “When that happens, I have to stop training, test my sugar, eat some quick carbohydrates and wait about 10 to 15 minutes before testing again and getting back to training.” Both high and low levels of blood sugars can cause issues, so Mott has to make sure he always takes his blood glucose monitor and a sugary drink with him to the gym. Still, as complicated as things are, Mott believes that bodybuilding has been beneficial in terms of his health. “Getting into bodybuilding and fitness has probably been the best thing I have done for my diabetes. It’s one of the best medications Continue reading >>

Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding

Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding

Many people with the terrible illness of diabetes do not realize how much they can benefit from following a bodybuilding lifestyle. In this article, I'll point out what the top benefits are for following a healthy bodybuilding lifestyle if you suffer from diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes comes in two forms: Type 1 Diabetes: With this type, people need to take insulin injections so this is often called "insulin dependent diabetes". Insulin is the hormone responsible for delivering the nutrients (carbs, proteins, and fats) into the muscle cells and is essential for energy production from the glucose (carbs) that come from food. The pancreas is the organ responsible for this hormone's production. Unfortunately, Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented as it is a result of an autoimmune reaction that causes the cells in the pancreas to stop working. Typically, this happens on the early ages between 8-12 (though cases have been reported where it happens much later). Type 2 Diabetes: This type requires no need for insulin shots as it is caused by the cells' reduced capability to let insulin in and do its job. This condition is called insulin insensitivity or low insulin sensitivity. When the cells reject the hormone insulin, then not only does the person get lousy energy production but also starts to get fat due to the fact that since the nutrients cannot be delivered to the appropriate tissues, then they just get stored. In addition, once the body notices that the cells are not having adequate insulin uptake, then it starts to increase its insulin production in an attempt to compensate. This only worsens the problem as cells become even more resistant and body fat continues to increase from anything that the person eats. Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding A healthy bodybuildin Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Living with diabetes and trying to build a great body can be a challenge. From the muscle wasting effects of high blood glucose right through to consumption of unwanted calories to treat low blood glucose, training to build a stronger better looking diabetic body can be a frustrating task. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the major problems people with diabetes face when it comes to training for a better body. The naïve personal trainer will also gain a better insight into what diabetes is and how exercise can prove both beneficial and detrimental to diabetic health. A GROWING PROBLEM At present, over 82 million people are living with Diabetes in the world, of which 46% are undiagnosed. What’s worse is the majority of these conditions are Type 2, the preventable form of Diabetes. Diabetes is a huge problem and the costs to society, and the economy is high and escalating. The International Diabetes Federation reported that Diabetes caused 5.1 million deaths in 2013, that’s one death from diabetes every six seconds! The cost to the economy doesn’t get much better with $548 billion dollars spent in 2013. By 2040, it’s estimated that: One adult in 10 will have diabetes 642 million people globally Diabetes-related health expenditure will exceed $802 billion Urgent Need For Focus Given the sheer threat to society government policy must focus on: Reducing the obesity Crisis (Type 2 Prevention) Cost effective Type 2 Treatment Cost effective Type 1 Management Cost effective Gestational Diabetes treatment Unless we do this, we are likely to see more people having to endure complications and an accompanying rise in diabetes spending that our government health services will simply not be able to afford. DEFINING DIABETES Diabetes mellitus is a group of m Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2. From a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, and meal plans for each can be viewed though the relevant links here where you can also read more about the conditions. The plan below is aimed at a type 1 diabetic, i.e. who replies on injections of insulin to control their blood sugar levels, and who is looking to increase their muscle size and strength. The individual will more likely be on an insulin regimen which allows for some flexibility by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. Regular meals and snacks are encouraged, especially in respect of slow-released low glycaemic carbohydrate foods as the basis of each meal and snack. If you do not control your own insulin regimen, then speak to your doctor or diabetes specialist nurse. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. Many diabetics feel they cannot make notable muscle and strength gains due to their condition, but there is no reason at all why a diabetic cannot make just as good gains as a non diabetic. There is nothing revolutionary and special about a diet for type 1 diabetics; it's simply based on the healthy eating guidelines which everyone should be following, so simply incorporate concepts applicable to muscle growth, and the results will be fruitful. So called 'diabetic products' such as special chocolates, cakes, biscuits, etc are not recommended. Eating a range of low fat, low sugar, high fibre 'ordinary' foods is far better. Many of these 'diabetic products' are no lower in fat or calories and are normally more expensive. Some contain the sweetener sorbitol which can cause Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Bodybuilding With Diabetes.

Weight training can be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. When individuals hear the term "bodybuilding," they automatically think of competitive bodybuilding. In all reality, this is just one very small sector of a large subset of the population who weight trains (e.g., body builds) for general aesthetics and health. Weight training itself can also be therapeutic and is recommended for the prevention and treatment of many diseases and illnesses. For example, it is recommended that people with diabetes exercise regularly. This is true for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A Brief Background About Diabetes The rate of diabetes is soaring at an unthinkable level in North America. This increase is related to the obesity epidemic in this country; diabetes is one of the many diseases associated with obesity. There Are Two Main Types Of Diabetes: Type I Type II In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (organ responsible for insulin production) completely stops producing insulin. Insulin is the hormone necessary to use glucose (sugar) found in foods for energy. Therefore, individuals with type 1 diabetes must take insulin shots. This usually develops in children between the ages of 8 to 12, but can develop at any age. I'm aware of one woman who developed type I diabetes in her mid 50's. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented; it is an autoimmune disease that ultimately results in the cells of the pancreas which produce insulin to stop functioning. On the contrary, type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to produce and/or unable to properly use insulin. This accounts for about 90% of the t Continue reading >>

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes won't stop you from building muscle. However, it's wise to follow a few precautions when it comes to gaining muscle. There are many different types of exercise and one of the most popular is strength or power training, which is very effective for building strong bones and muscles. Strong muscles collect oxygen and nutrients from the blood much more efficiently than weak ones, meaning that any physical activity you do will require less cardiac work and put less strain on your heart. As well as being good for the heart, they also improve weight control and help the body remain sensitive to the hormone insulin, which is vital for keeping blood sugar levels in check and preventing or controlling type 2 diabetes. Here are some tips on how you can build strong, lean muscle, without affecting your diabetes: Load up on protein Protein intake is vital for building muscle. However, your body constantly drains its protein reserves for other uses such as producing hormones, resulting in less protein available for muscle building. To counteract this, you need to build and store new proteins faster than your body breaks down old proteins. You should look to consume about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which is roughly the maximum amount your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein include: Chicken Tuna Eggs, milk and cottage cheese Protein shakes (see below for more about shakes) Remember, the more protein your body stores (protein synthesis), the larger your muscles grow. Have a protein shake before your workout Protein shakes are very effective for improving strength. While many trainers have a post-workout shake, research has shown that drinking a shake containing at least 6 grams of amino acids - the muscle-building blocks of protein - an Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Bodybuilding

Diabetes & Bodybuilding

There are two types of Diabetes Mellitus: types 1 and 2. The pathology of each of the two diseases is completely different and, from a nutrition and exercise viewpoint, each should be treated differently. Blood glucose levels are controlled by the hormone insulin produced by the pancreas. Glucose comes from our food from starchy foods, like rice, potatoes, bread, etc and from sugar. It is also manufactured in the liver from where it is passed into the blood. In diabetes glucose cannot be used effectively as a fuel by the body so levels rise in the blood and excess passes into urine. This is why diabetics, before diagnosis, pee more and feel excessively thirsty. There may also be other symptoms like lethargy, blurred vision, lack of concentration and fatigue. In type 1 diabetes there is no insulin produced from the pancreas at all, so the patient has to be treated with injections of insulin a number of times a day, as well as following a suitable diet. There are a number of different types of insulin regimens advised by doctors, and which regimen an individual follows may have implications for the diet. Fortunately, newer insulin regimens encourage patients to take more control over their own nutrition themselves. In type 2 diabetes insulin is produced from the pancreas but is unable to act properly in the body. This is as a consequence of a metabolic state of the body called insulin resistance and, because the insulin is not having its desired effect, this leads to more and more insulin being released; high blood glucose levels are associated with high blood insulin levels. Type 2 diabetes is often, but not always, associated with being overweight and it usually occurs in people over 40 years old, with the main exceptions being younger people who are morbidly obese. Reg Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Bodybuilding

Diabetes And Bodybuilding

Gallery Diet & Nutrition As most of you should know Diabetics can not consume sugar as their Pancreas (the organ for dealing with the production of Insulin & the breakdown of sugar) does not work anymore and has basically died. Due to this we take Insulin shots every day in order to break down the sugar inside our bodies from fruit, carbs etc. This doesn't mean that we can just go filling ourself with sugary snacks and what not. This would be extremely dangerous. As much Insulin as we give ourself it can never replace the Human body's own Insulin producing abilities & it's way of breaking down the sugar in our bloodstream so we have to be extra careful. Anyway, on to diet within a fitness/bodybuilding environment. A lot of people consume a sugary snack before training in order to give them energy for their workouts but being a diabetic I can not do this. Instead I try to take in as many GOOD slow acting carbs as I can the morning & daytime before training, such as Brown bread, brown rice/pasta, oats etc to fill my muscles with glycogen used as energy instead of sugar. This means that I can also not drink any energy drinks before training as they contain sugar so I normally just take a couple caffeine pills instead if I'm feeling tired. Being a bodybuilder & being diabetic DOES have it's advantages though. For example, it is not Impossible but highly unlikely that I will ever get fat whilst being diabetic as my income of sugary snacks such as Chocolate bars, cakes, fizzy drinks etc is next to none and as we all know these can be a major influence in your weight gain. Also, my teeth stay clean (although I get abuse off most of you for being British and apparently having bad teeth haha). Also, as a diabetic I need to eat 6 times a day which fits in perfectly with my bodybu Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection?

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection?

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection? Not only will bodybuilding help to prevent the onset of adult diabetes, which is one of the most prevalent diseases today, but it will also really play an important role. Here is why bodybuilding is a must... When weight lifting the muscle tissues are primed to suck up excess glucose in the blood. IIntense exercise cannot be performed unless carbohydrates are taken in at some point. You may need to monitor how many carbohydrates you eat pre- or post-workout. You read information about bodybuilding, and then you read information about diabetes . But very rarely do you read information about the two together. One thing many people miss is the connection between bodybuilding and diabetes. While if you have diabetes, getting involved in bodybuilding is not automatically going to cure you - but the benefits of a regular strength training program as far as diabetes is concerned are tremendous. Not only will bodybuilding help to prevent the onset of adult diabetes, which is one of the most prevalent diseases today, but it will also really play an important role in controlling it in those who are already affected. Here is why bodybuilding is a must if this disease is something you are concerned with. Bodybuilding Will Help To Prevent The Onset Of Adult Diabetes, Which Is One Of The Most Prevalent Diseases Today. One of the first reasons why weightlifting is helpful when trying to manage diabetes is because of the fact it helps to decrease the total body weight through the reduction of body fat tissue. Unlike cardio training which has a higher tendency to reduce both fat and muscle mass, weight training really helps with the promotion of lean body mass while dieting, thus helps prevent this muscle mass loss. Since having Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Colette Nelson has lived with type 1 diabetes for almost 30 years. Despite her impressive bodybuilding physique today, she was a “skinny” aerobics instructor when she was younger. It wasn’t until the age of 19 when she began lifting weights. Today, she’s competed in two-dozen competitions, and is works as a Certified Diabetes Educator for a hospital, and trains people across the country in bodybuilding. As a past competitive powerlifter myself, I can’t help but admire Colette’s dedication to her training, and most importantly, her diabetes. And she doesn’t let stigmas around women being “too muscular” stop her from being a total powerhouse. Ginger: When folks see an athlete like you, especially living with diabetes, I think they tend to assume that making exercise, nutrition, and diabetes a priority in your life is easy for you. How did this part of your life actually evolve for you? Colette: It is never easy…it is a choice. I made a choice to make my life fabulous rather than medicore…and to live it to the fullest! I never wanted to let diabetes limit my possibilities in life. At a young age I learned the benefits of diet and exercise had on my blood sugar levels. I realized that it helped me feel strong when inside I felt broken. I let that mentalitity motivate me to stay dedicated to a lifestyle of healthy eating and good nutrition. I wanted to LIVE and I knew that if I didn’t keep tight blood glucose control I could suffer from some of the many complications I heard about that surround diabetes. Ginger: What is the hardest part about diabetes management for you today? Colette: Diabetes is never easy! I think what people don’t understand is that diabetse is not just about taking insulin. It is a lot more complicated. Your body is so dynamic Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Type 2 Diabetes

Say Goodbye To Type 2 Diabetes

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on Linkedin Share on Pinterest When you look at the statistics of those who suffer from Type 2 Diabetes its staggering. To be more accurate, its downright SCARY. 9.3% of the population suffers from this disease. Over twenty-one million people in the United States have diabetesanother eight million who are living their lives as a ticking time bomb undiagnosed/unaware that they are diabetic. Each year on average 1.4 million Americans go to their doctor and are diagnosed. If you look at the statistics from 2010, you will find diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death among Americans. Do you have kids or little nieces or nephews? About 208,000 kids under the age of twenty suffer from diabetes. Diabetes costs are consistently on the rise each year with more and more people getting diagnosed which is why total costs for the disease is now over $245 billion just in the United States alone. Conditions that can be caused due to diabetes: Diabetes is terrifying, theres no doubt about it. With so many people suffering from this disease around the United States, teams of researchers have been trying to find a cure for years. Medications are already available by prescription but none that truly defeat the disease, rather only helping to control it (to an extent). Americans suffering from this disease find themselves checking their blood sugar daily. The worst part about diabetes is that many Americans dont truly know how to control it through diet. They simply use their insulin as a crutch to fix their poor eating habits. Its for these reasons that many find themselves in a downward spiral (health-wise) because they simply have no clue what a healthy, nutrient-dense diet looks like. Instead, they feast on a plethora of Continue reading >>

Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe

Scrawny Boy With Type 1 Diabetes Becomes Mr. Universe

These days, Doug Burns is a modern Sampson. The reigning Mr. Universe, he’s two hundred pounds of sheer muscle and the picture of good health. Of the skinny little boy with type 1 who used to work out in the woods alone, all that remains are a wry sense of humor and an attractively self-deprecating manner. They’re unexpected in a man who’s triumphed in the uber-masculine world of bodybuilding, but there’s a lot that’s unexpected about Doug Burns. Doug was born in Washington DC, into a family without a bit of type 1 history. His dad, who worked with NASA, moved the family to the backwoods of Mississippi when Doug was about eleven. By that time he’d had type 1 for four years, ever since a severe episode of keto-acidosis at age seven. He was what used to be called a “brittle diabetic,” taking multiple injections of NPH and Regular, and he had problems with the delayed effect of the Regular. On top of that, he was trying to handle his testing with urinalysis, which could be six hours off the mark. Consequently, he was frequently in keto-acidosis or insulin shock, with constant episodes of both extreme highs and extreme lows. As a result of his sugar management problems, Doug weighed only 58 pounds by the time he was eleven. Known as “the bag of bones,” he was beaten up by pretty much everybody in school. He still remembers a girl in fifth grade who whacked him with her purse and “beat the hell out of me right in front of the class.” In Mississippi he wasn’t bullied as much, but as an emaciated kid with a disease no one had heard of, he was ostracized as an oddity. At the age of twelve, in 1977, Doug came across a picture of the Biblical Sampson holding a lion in a headlock. He’d never seen anything like Sampson’s hugely muscular body, and for t Continue reading >>

How To Gain Muscle With Diabetes

How To Gain Muscle With Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Preparing to ExerciseBuilding Muscle with ExerciseStaying Safe While ExercisingEating to Build MuscleCommunity Q&A Staying active is very important if you have diabetes. Some studies indicate that weight training exercises can prevent and even reverse the onset of type 2 diabetes — muscle is a dense tissue, and it has a high metabolic rate. As you build more muscle, your body burns more calories even when you are just sitting there doing nothing, versus someone with less muscle. Although there are great benefits, you do have to use caution when exercising. By learning the proper steps to take, you can build muscle mass even with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

When I tell people I'm diabetic, they look at me like I'm joking. They find it hard to believe that here is this muscled up guy, with relatively low body fat, who is a diabetic. Often times when we think of a diabetic we think of someone who has made poor food choices their whole life, is overweight, and often lazy. Well things aren't always as they appear. I was diagnosed with diabetes over a year ago, and was borderline diabetic the year prior. I have asked myself over and over again what could have caused this. Was it steroid use over the years? Was it massive food consumption and carbs? Was it just in my cards since I have a family history of auto immune disorders (my mother has chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia)? The thing is I'll never know. My best guess is a perfect storm of limited sleep, excessive dieting which caused my liver to dump glucose into my body instead of food, and elevated cortisol levels for far too long. You see, I never really stopped dieting after this show I competed in back in 2009. I stayed very lean year round, and ate like I was contest prepping all the time. But that's neither here nor there, it is what it is now. Just before I was diagnosed with diabetes I noticed how thirsty I was all the time. It was worse at night, I just could not drink enough water to satisfy myself. I could literally drink 5-6 20 ounce bottles of water within an hour, and still felt thirsty. I also noticed how tired I was. I would wake up, go to the gym, and an hour later I felt like going back to sleep again. Then when it really was time to go to sleep at night, I could not fall asleep for shit!! I tossed and turned, woke up every couple hours, and day in and day out this was how it was for a couple months. I also noticed how irritable I was after eating a Continue reading >>

10 Reasons For Hyperglycemia During Training

10 Reasons For Hyperglycemia During Training

Editor’s Note: Phil Graham (BSc, CISSN) is a certified sports nutritionist and competitive body builder. Learn more of his training tips on his site Diabetic Muscle and Fitness. High blood sugar is one of the biggest hurdles to improving health, getting in shape and performing well. I want to discuss the 10 of the biggest reasons why blood glucose levels tend to go high (hyperglycemia) in people living with diabetes. Please bear in mind that Type 1 and 2 diabetes are different and need to be managed differently. Key factors include: the type of medication, physical activity levels, training volume, muscle mass, other illnesses and susceptibility to life stress. Hypoinsulinemia You simply don’t have enough insulin in your bloodstream to facilitate the transport of glucose into target tissues. As a result, your blood glucose levels remain high, increasing the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which exacerbates hyperglycemia. This may be due to missing a dose, eating too many carbs or uncontrolled glucose production from your liver during times of stress. Fix – Administer appropriate amounts of insulin or other diabetic mediation specific to your abnormal blood glucose level. Only do this under the close guidance and monitoring of a professional healthcare team. Prolonged pump disconnect Similar to above. Lack of insulin in the blood stream means only one thing for the individual deficient in insulin — high blood glucose. Fix – Ensure you pump is well connected at all time, especially if you’ve spent the day doing manual labor. Be mindful that wearing an exercise belt, for powerlifting and bodybuilding purposes can lead to pump discomfort and disconnect during training, consequently leading to high blood glucose. Malfunctioning needles If your needle fails t Continue reading >>

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