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Diabetes And Belly Fat

Belly Fat Clearest Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Belly Fat Clearest Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Men who measure more than 102cm (40 inches) around the middle – and not below the belly – are five times more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than men with a smaller waist, while women who measure more than 88cm (35 inches) are three times more likely to be diagnosed than others, according to advice from Public Health England. People who are simply overweight, as well as those who are obese, are risking type 2 diabetes, which can lead to blindness, amputations and an early death, the public health body has warned. Abdominal fat – around the stomach – is a better indicator of your chances of getting it than BMI (body mass index), which is a ratio of weight to height. "Diabetes is a massive problem. It is getting clearer and clearer that it is a massive problem in England and the single best thing you can do to address it is to lose weight," said Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England. In an advisory report to local authorities, who now have responsibility for public health including combating obesity, Public Health England is stating categorically for the first time that excess weight is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Some 90% of people with the disease are overweight. Treating people with the disease and its complications - they also risk cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and depression – cost £8.8bn in 2010-11, which is approaching 10% of the NHS budget. Around 23,300 people died prematurely that year because of it. It is not just about those who are morbidly obese, said Tedstone. "Over 60% of us are at risk of type 2 diabetes because we are overweight," she said. "But overweight has become normalised and many people no longer realise they are potentially endangering their health. "People underestimate the Continue reading >>

Banishing Belly Fat

Banishing Belly Fat

Amy Campbell, CDE, is a registered dietitian and the author of several books about diabetes, including 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet and Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning. With winter winding down and swimsuit season right around the corner, our thoughts often turn to the few pounds that we may have put on since the holidays. And if you’re like many people, those few pounds may be clinging to your middle just like, well, a spare tire. Even if you’re not overweight or looking to lose weight, you may have noticed (especially if you’re a menopausal woman) that your weight has shifted and that your midsection is thicker than it used to be. Self, meet belly fat. What is belly fat? And why does it matter? Belly fat is just what the name implies. It’s fat that piles on around your waist and in your abdominal section. The good news, if you want to view it as such, is that everyone has some belly fat—even supermodels and physically fit people. However, unlike fat in other areas of your body, such as your arms, thighs, or under your chin, belly fat is deeper and more serious in terms of its health implications. Another term for belly fat is visceral fat. Visceral fat is not your run-of-the-mill type of fat. Rather, it’s a vicious type of fat that wraps itself around the internal organs. Subcutaneous fat, on other hand, is a layer of fat that lies just beneath the skin. It’s annoying for sure, but it’s pretty harmless compared to visceral fat. Unlike fat in other areas of your body, belly fat is more serious in terms of its health implications. Keep in mind that belly fat is generally a combination of both subcutaneous and visceral fat. While there’s no easy way to know how much of each you have (short of having a CT scan or an MRI), grab a Continue reading >>

Exercise A Must For Losing Deep Belly Fat

Exercise A Must For Losing Deep Belly Fat

March 4, 2005 -- When a woman with type 2 diabetes wants to lose her belly, exercise is her best friend. Even if she diets perfectly, eating all the right foods in ideal amounts, her waistline may not budge unless she works out. Exercise is required to lose excess fat deep in the abdomen, says a new study. Why is it so important to lose abdominal fat? Researchers have shown that having even a little extra fat in the wrong places can increase the chances of developing disease. Fat deep in the abdomen, called visceral fat, poses a greater health risk than fat on other parts of the body, such as the hips. Exercise has already been shown to help obese people without diabetes lose visceral fat. Now, the verdict is in for overweight diabetic women: Get moving to get rid of this dangerous fat. Fat metabolism is altered in women with type 2 diabetes, write the researchers. That's why they focused their study on the effects of exercise in obese women with type 2 diabetes. Thirty-three obese, postmenopausal women participated. On average, they were about 57 years old and had had diabetes for at least one year. The women were in for a major change when they enrolled in the 14-week study. None had dieted or exercised regularly in a year. The women were divided into three groups. Some women were given a low-calorie diet high in healthy monounsaturated fats like olive oil. The dieting women also got nutritional consultation, a week's worth of menu ideas, and a weekly meeting for motivation and support. Another group was given a supervised aerobic exercise program consisting of walking 50 minutes three times a week, occasionally doing other activities for variety. The third group followed both programs. Before and after the study the women got MRI scans to see how much visceral fat th Continue reading >>

Lose Belly Fat Fast With This Diabetes-friendly Exercise Routine

Lose Belly Fat Fast With This Diabetes-friendly Exercise Routine

Everyone seems to want a slimmer middle, a smaller pant size — you know the drill. But trimming your waistline is about so much more than how you look in the mirror; it’s about improving your insulin sensitivity, glucose levels, and risk for diabetes complications, such as heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. “Current research shows that abdominal fat is a driving factor behind the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, as well as [a factor that affects] how people manage the condition,” explains Margaret Eckert-Norton, PhD, RN, a certified diabetes educator and associate professor of nursing at St. Joseph’s College in New York City. The Difference Between Visceral Fat and Subcutaneous Fat Belly fat, also known as abdominal or visceral fat, hangs out in and around your internal organs. It's known to secrete a variety of proteins that trigger inflammation and affect your body’s hormone levels, and it can increase your risk for a variety of conditions (but more on this later). For this reason, some experts actually call it “active fat.” That’s in contrast to subcutaneous fat, which sits directly underneath your skin and pretty much just acts as an energy reserve without strongly influencing health, Dr. Eckert-Norton says. How Excess Belly Fat Can Increase the Risk of Diabetes Complications So what are those conditions that belly fat influences? The first and most notable one for anyone with diabetes is insulin resistance, she says. One of the many factors at play is retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), a compound that visceral cells secrete, dulling the body’s sensitivity to the hormone insulin, encouraging the development and progression of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Those complications range from peripheral and central diabeti Continue reading >>

Exercise Alone Can Melt Away Dangerous Belly Fat In Diabetics

Exercise Alone Can Melt Away Dangerous Belly Fat In Diabetics

Just by increasing their physical activity, people with type 2 diabetes can lose fat that accumulates in the liver and abdomen and lower their risk of heart problems. Doctors recommend that people diagnosed with diabetes get regular exercise, since physical activity can keep them at a healthy weight and help organs like the lungs, liver and heart to work at their best. But the details of how breaking a sweat influences the different fat deposits around the body are not so clear. There is increasing evidence, for example, that buildup of fat in the abdomen and deep in organs such as the liver and heart, can be more harmful than fat deposited just under the skin, since the more deeply embedded fat, known as visceral fat, releases hormones and other compounds that can affect how efficiently the body breaks down calories. But because most studies involving exercise also allow volunteers to change their diet, pinpointing how physical activity changes fat depots in the body has been hard to document. To gather more information on this relationship, researchers from Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands turned to detailed MRI images to study 12 middle-aged diabetic patients both before and after they participated in a six month program of moderate-intensity exercise. The volunteers exercised for 3.5 hours to 6 hours a week, and participated in two endurance and two resistance training sessions, finishing up with a 12-day hiking expedition. Throughout the study, however, they were told not to change their diet and eating habits. After the training, the researchers found that the participants’ heart functions remained relatively unchanged, but the second round of MRI scans revealed significant decreases in the volume of fat that surrounded the heart and lungs as Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: Abdominal Fat 'could Be Type 2 Diabetes Predictor'

Diabetes News: Abdominal Fat 'could Be Type 2 Diabetes Predictor'

Having an “apple-shaped” body - where weight is centred around the abdomen - holds a higher risk, scientists found. Experts from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in the US found that having a genetic predisposition to “abdominal adiposity” - or an apple-shaped body - was associated with a higher risk for Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Their study, published in the journal JAMA, examined the pattern of gene variants associated to this body shape - in which weight is deposited around the abdomen, rather than in the hips and thighs. Using data from a previous study that identified 48 gene variants associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index - an established measure for abdominal adiposity - they developed a genetic risk score. The experts then used this risk score against six previous genome studies and to individual data from the UK Biobank - assessing data on more than 400,000 people. They found that having a genetic predisposition to abdominal adiposity is linked to significant increases in the incidence of Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, along with increases in blood lipids, blood glucose and systolic blood pressure. Senior report author Sekar Kathiresan, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the MGH Centre for Genomic Medicine, said: “People vary in their distribution of body fat - some put fat in their belly, which we call abdominal adiposity, and some in their hips and thighs. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. “Abdominal adiposity has been correlated with cardiometabolic disease, but whether it actually Continue reading >>

The Role Of Belly Fat In Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Role Of Belly Fat In Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

In a recent study, scientists found that there is a link between belly fat and type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers set out to find if genetic evidence is consistent with a casual relationship with belly fat and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease that other studies have found. They conducted a study where they tested the association of a polygenic risk score for wast-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index which is a measure of belly fat, with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease through blood cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and glycemic phenotypes. Study Details Data was taken from 4 genome-wide association studies conducted between 2007 and 2015 involving 322,154 participants and other data from the UK Biobank collected between 2007-2011 involving another 111,986 participants. Then, estimates for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease were taken from summary statistics of two other genome0wide association studies which took place between 2007 and 2015 and involving 149,821 individuals and another 184,305 individuals “combined with individual-level data from the UK Biobank”. The researchers found that a genetic predisposition to a higher waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for body mass index) was linked to more risk for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. The study authors concluded in their study abstract that “These results provide evidence supportive of a causal association between abdominal adiposity and these outcomes.” How to Measure Your Waist Waist measurements or waist-to-hip ratio are both good ways to determine future health risks. The Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health states that according to the American Heart Association, waist circumference should be no larger than 35 inches (88 centimeters) for women a Continue reading >>

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Dr. Oz: Diabetes Fight Starts With Belly Fat

Almost everyone knows someone who has diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, an estimated 23.6 million people in the United States -- or 7.8 percent of the population -- have diabetes, a serious, lifelong condition. It is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Diabetes is also associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body. The disease often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Diabetes is also on the rise in kids, as a result of obesity. Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of Fox Network's "The Dr. Oz Show," is passionate about this public health crisis. He appeared on "The Early Show" Wednesday from Washington, D.C., where he is the keynote speaker at the National Conference on Diabetes. Dr. Oz said he estimates that 57 million more people than the American Diabetes Association statistics include are likely to have diabetes or be pre-diabetic. Oz said, "The irony is the earlier you intervene and help folks, the better they'll do. It'll double the survival rates, but 90 percent of people don't realize it." So how do you know if you have diabetes? Oz said thirst, excess urination and weakness are factors, but another big factor is belly fat. "Your belly fat is what tells us if you're at high risk for being a Type II diabetic." Oz gave a formula for learning if you're at risk: You take your height in inches and divide that in half. If your waist size is more than half your height, you're at higher risk for developing complications from belly fat. He said the leading complication is diabetes. Oz said the formula works for men, women and children. Oz also suggested these practical ways to combat diabetes: • Include fiber with Breakfast - "Everyone knows bre Continue reading >>

How To Lose Stomach Fat Resulting From Diabetes

How To Lose Stomach Fat Resulting From Diabetes

Excess stomach fat, also known as abdominal or central obesity, is linked to impaired insulin action or insulin resistance. Consequently, abdominal obesity is associated with a higher risk for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Weight loss, particularly loss of stomach fat, can help manage diabetes and reduce the risk of pre-diabetes and T2DM. However, loss of body fat occurs all over when you lose weight, so it cannot be targeted to the abdominal area only. Methods to lose weight are focused on a nutritious, reduced-calorie diet with an increased level of physical activity. Overall Weight Loss Effects on Stomach Fat Body fat is categorized as either subcutaneous fat, found under the skin, or visceral fat that surrounds internal organs, including those in the abdominal cavity. While either type of fat can be found in the abdomen, visceral fat is linked to a greater risk of health problems such as prediabetes and T2DM. An article published in the January 2008 "International Journal of Obesity" reviewed results from 61 studies examining visceral and subcutaneous fat loss after weight loss interventions. Researchers found modest weight loss resulted in a preferential loss of abdominal fat, but this benefit is less or even negated in weight loss greater than 20 percent. Diet and Loss of Stomach Fat According to 2014 statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 9 percent of the U.S. population suffers from diabetes, and 85 percent of people with diabetes are overweight. Loss of abdominal fat in T2DM, as part of overall weight loss, helps control T2DM by improving insulin action. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a variety of eating patterns, as part of a reduced-calorie meal plan, can be used to lose weight. These patter Continue reading >>

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

I am 83 years old and have had diabetes for 48 years. I have tried for seven years to lose weight, and I lose it everywhere except my stomach. I've injected insulin in my stomach for 45 years. Is it true that the insulin I inject holds the fat in my stomach? If so, how can I get rid of the stomach fat without moving the injection site to other parts of my body? Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes-friendly Meals That Beat Belly Fat

10 Diabetes-friendly Meals That Beat Belly Fat

These recipes are delicious: That’s the first thing you need to know. And we’re not talking “delicious for diabetes-friendly” food—no, these are good without any ifs or ands. The only but is that all 10 of the following recipes are especially formulated to help flatten your belly and fight diabetes. Some are loaded with fruits and veggies, others feature lean proteins or fish, some contain whole grains—and all have an added dash of monounsaturated fatty acids, or MUFAs for short, which help target belly fat, control blood sugar levels, and reduce insulin resistance. Whether you’re craving French toast, pasta salad, or chicken parm these 10 meals will help keep your blood sugar steady, your taste buds happy and your belly nice and slim. 600+ Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Your Slow Cooker! Pick up your copy today! It’s the quintessential Sunday morning breakfast—with a twist: Swap standard white for whole grain bread (one study showed that simple step could reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by up to 20%); and top your toast with strawberries (which research suggests helps regulate blood sugar) and MUFA-rich almonds. See the Strawberry Almond French Toast recipe! Yes, you can most definitely still have pasta—just bulk up the dish with nutrient-rich vegetables, like broccoli—it’s packed with cancer-fighting vitamin A and it’s a good source of fiber, which helps slow the rise of blood sugar after you eat. Stir in belly-flattening olives and 2 tablespoons of pesto for extra flavor and more MUFAs. See the Tortellini Pasta Salad recipe! You’ve heard people say avocado is full of "good" fat, but do you know how good it is? Research suggests MUFAs (found in avocados and other foods) not only help you lose weight and shrink belly fat, but they specif Continue reading >>

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Why Getting Rid Of Belly Fat May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Belly fat can hamper blood-sugar-regulating organs.IstockphotoExcess weight is probably the number one risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Yes, other factors, such as genes and aging do play a role in type 2 diabetes. But an International Obesity Task Force estimated in 2002 that 60% of diabetes cases around the world were due to weight gain, and in Western nations it was closer to 90%. If you are obese or overweight, you are 90 times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as someone who is not, according to a review of medical literature published in 2003 by University of Kentucky and other researchers. Why belly fat is so bad And while any excess fat cranks up the risk of diabetes, fat in your midsectionwhich tends to swaddle organs that play a key role in regulating blood sugaris a bigger contributor to risk. "When those fat cells go in and around your belly, not down in your buttocks or your hips, but when it's around the belly … that fat in and of itself works to block the action of insulin, which is necessary to lower the blood sugar," says Gerald Bernstein, MD, director of the diabetes management program at the Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. More about type 2 diabetes Insulin normally triggers the liver to take up extra blood glucose and store the energy for future use. But when the liver is submerged in fat tissue, insulin "can't get the liver to respond," he says. As a result, blood sugar can accumulate in the bloodstream, where it can damage organs all over your body. But even a relatively moderate amount of weight loss and exercise can protect you from diabetes. Next Page: How exercise helps [ pagebreak ]How exercise helps, even if you don't lose weight Regular exercise makes cells more sensitive to insulin, Continue reading >>

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

Blasted Belly Fat: What You Can Do

As frustrating as it is to carry around that spare tire or suffer from “muffin top” syndrome, you might find some comfort in the fact that a slimmer, trimmer middle is something that everyone strives for, even celebrities (OK, I realize that’s little consolation). But my point is that, whether your goal is to lose weight to improve your health, to look better, or to feel better — or all three — it can be a challenge. Fortunately, there are steps that you can take to whittle your waist somewhat and, perhaps most importantly, lower your risk for a host of health problems. Blasting Away Belly Fat: Here’s How Losing weight can be a challenge, and it seems to be harder for some than others. Plus, depending on how much you want to lose, you may be in it for the long haul. Keep in mind that everyone is different, and what may work for one person may not be the best option for someone else. There really is no magic bullet…yet. And if there were, all of us would have heard of it by now. That being said, last week I mentioned that liposuction (not exactly a feasible option for many people due to the cost) is not a contender for losing visceral fat. So what does work? Here are some possible options: Move it. Yes, you do need to exercise. There’s no way around it. For some people, exercise doesn’t result in actual weight loss (meaning, the scale may not budge), but it can and does shrink visceral fat. Even if you haven’t gained weight, you may notice that fat redistributes itself and tends to settle around your middle. This is especially true of women who have gone through menopause. A study done at Duke University showed that men and women who did no exercise for six months increased their visceral fat by 9%; those who exercised regularly decreased their viscer Continue reading >>

Is This How Abdominal Fat Leads To Diabetes?

Is This How Abdominal Fat Leads To Diabetes?

Is this how abdominal fat leads to diabetes? It is known that being overweight or obese leads to poor health, but it may be less known that abdominal fat is the most harmful type. Until now, researchers were unsure of the mechanisms responsible for this but now, they reveal how an enzyme produced by our liver raises the risk of diabetes. Inflammation in the fat around the belly is particularly harmful, and new research reveals why. When it comes to the harmful consequences of excess fat, the way it is distributed across the body is key. Medical News Today have recently reported on studies showing that abdominal fat is deeply tied to type 2 diabetes and heart disease . We have also covered studies suggesting that women, in particular, could be at an increased cardiometabolic risk if they have a higher waist-to-hip ratio. Additional research has found that belly fat is particularly dangerous when inflamed. Older studies have shown that local inflammation in the adipose tissue leads to cardiometabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance . But the exact mechanism responsible for this connection between adipose tissue inflammation and cardiometabolic disorders has remained somewhat unclear for instance, researchers have wondered whether the inflammation is "a cause or a consequence of insulin resistance." Now, researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City, NY, help to shed some much-needed light on the issue; they reveal that the liver contributes to this inflammation. The team was led by Dr. Ira Tabas who is the Richard J. Stock Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and the findings were published in the journal Nature. The key role of DPP4 inhibitors in diabetes Dr. Tabas and his colleagues Continue reading >>

Abdominal Fat May Cause Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease

Abdominal Fat May Cause Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease

Researchers have found that abdominal fat may either cause or relate to the cause of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. People who are genetically at a greater risk of having a higher waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index are likely to have an increased risk of developing these conditions. New research detailing these findings was published in JAMA. Body mass index (BMI) is used to measure body fat based on height and weight, and it is a common method of working out whether a person is overweight or obese. Obesity is a major risk factor for both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Regardless of BMI, body fat distribution can vary from one person to the next. Some people carry more fat around their visceral organs, called abdominal adiposity (fat), while others carry fat on their thighs and hips. Previous observational studies have indicated that abdominal fat is associated with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. However, it remains unclear whether these associations represent a causal relationship. Dr. Sekar Kathiresan, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a study to investigate whether being genetically inclined to have an increased waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for BMI (a measure of abdominal fat) was linked to cardiometabolic traits (such as lipids, glucose, insulin, and systolic blood pressure), and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. The team gathered data from four genome-wide association studies conducted between 2007 and 2015, which included up to 322,154 participants, and individual-level, cross-sectional data from the UK Biobank collected between 2007 and 2011, which included data from a further 111,986 people. Estimates for cardiometabolic traits were based on this combined data Continue reading >>

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