diabetestalk.net

Diabetes And Aspertame

An Aspartame Warning

An Aspartame Warning

It bothers me these researchers didn't grasp the impact of their study since they couldn't have adequately researched what GLP-1 does. Most anti- diabetic drugs boost GLP-1 in your body. Aspartame some how reduces your body's GLP-1 level for a prolonged time after eating it. It sounds like it damages the l-cells that produce GLP-1. The sweetener may be able to bring on temporary diabetes. I have heard about it raising BGs but this is really sinister. I try not to eat that stuff but from now on I will never eat it again. GLP-1 controls IR for endocrine tissue and is essential for liver dump control along with a dozen other anti- diabetic actions. The fact that it slows the emptying of your stomach is about the least important thing it does. GLP-1s a lipid lowering hormone and reduces CVD risk. When animals were given artificial sweeteners and also had a regular food that had sugar in it, then we would routinely see that the animals given the artificial sweeteners would gain excess weight and that they were fatter, even though they were getting fewer calories from the sweetened foods that we were giving them. We've actually measured a number of metabolic changes that seem to be caused by exposure to artificial sweetener in our animals. Swithers' research showed that the animals' physiological response to normal sugar was disrupted. We gave all of our animals what is known as an oral glucose tolerance test. It is the way that we identify diabetes in people. What we saw was that the animals that had previously gotten the artificial sweeteners were hyperglycaemic - their blood sugars went up higher than animals that had not been given the artificial sweeteners. In addition to not being able to control their blood sugar levels, they also released less of a peptide called GLP Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Aspartame For Diabetics

Dangers Of Aspartame For Diabetics

Having diabetes means watching what you eat and drink in order to keep your blood sugar levels in check. In addition, part of managing diabetes involves maintaining a healthy weight. To achieve both, you may look for products that are low in calories, sugar and carbohydrates, which sometimes means consuming products made with artificial sweeteners such as aspartame. If you are concerned about consuming aspartame, check with your doctor to see if it can be included in your diet plan. Video of the Day To cut back on sugar and calorie content, some foods and beverages are made with manufactured products called artificial sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners are much sweeter than table sugar and can add taste without all of the calories that table sugar has. One popular artificial sweetener is aspartame, which is a combination of two amino acids -- aspartic acid and phenylalanine -- and it is found under the names of Equal and Nutrasweet. While there has been much controversy over its use, there have been no clinical trials that prove that it is unsafe or that it contributes to cancer, headaches or any other type of disease, says FamilyDoctor.org. Since aspartame contains phenylalanine, you should not consume it if you have phenylketonuria, or PKU. Diabetes and Aspartame There have been claims or suggestions that diabetics can experience adverse health effects from consuming aspartame. However, there are no scientific studies to back up these claims. It appears that consuming aspartame poses no specific threat to those with diabetes, and products made with aspartame can help diabetics to satisfy a sweet tooth without ingesting too many calories or carbs, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that can cause spikes and drops in blood su Continue reading >>

Aspartame And Diabetes – Is It A Deadly Combination?

Aspartame And Diabetes – Is It A Deadly Combination?

So what is the concern over aspartame and diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is recommending and accepts the FDA’s conclusion that the consumption of Aspartame is safe and can be part of a healthy diet. Despite the research that is sounding the alarm all over the country and all over the world and despite the fact that an entire state, New Mexico, is trying to ban Aspartame, this dangerous substance is still being considered a “part of a healthy diet.” YIKES! Let’s let the experts tell us if we should be concerned about aspartame and diabetes: According to research conducted by H.J. Roberts, a diabetes specialist, a member of the ADA, and an authority on artificial sweeteners, Aspartame: 1) Leads to the precipitation of clinical diabetes. 2) Causes poorer diabetic control in diabetics on insulin or oral drugs. 3) Leads to the aggravation of diabetic complications such as retinopathy, cataracts, neuropathy and gastroparesis. 4) Causes convulsions. In a statement concerning the use of products containing aspartame by persons with diabetes and hypoglycemia, Roberts says: “Unfortunately, many patients in my practice, and others seen in consultation, developed serious metabolic, neurological and other complications that could be specifically attributed to using Aspartame products. This was evidenced by: “The loss of diabetic control, the intensification of hypoglycemia, the occurrence of presumed ‘insulin reactions’ (including convulsions) that proved to be Aspartame reactions, and the precipitation, aggravation or simulation of diabetic complications (especially impaired vision and neuropathy) while using these products.” “Dramatic improvement of such features after avoiding Aspartame, and the prompt predictable recurrence of these problem Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Linked To Diabetes Andobesity

Artificial Sweeteners Linked To Diabetes Andobesity

Artificial sweeteners linked to diabetes andobesity Artificial sweeteners linked to diabetes andobesity Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Sciences, University of Birmingham James Brown previously received funding from an independent food manufacturer to consult on their use of non-nutritive sweeteners Alex Conner does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. University of Birmingham provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK. Aston University provides funding as a member of The Conversation UK. Many countries have introduced a sugar tax in order to improve the health of their citizens. As a result, food and drink companies are changing their products to include low and zero-calorie sweeteners instead of sugar. However, there is growing evidence that sweeteners may have health consequences of their own. New research from the US, presented at the annual Experimental Biology conference in San Diego, found a link with consuming artificial sweeteners and changes in blood markers linked with an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in rats. Does this mean we need to ditch sweeteners as well as sugar? Sweeteners are generally non-nutritive substances meaning we cant use them for energy. Some of these compounds are entirely synthetic chemicals, produced to mimic the taste of sugar. These include saccharin, sucralose and aspartame. Others sweeteners are refined from chemicals found in plants, such as stevia and xylitol. Collectively, sweeteners are being consumed in increasing amounts with most diet or low-calorie food and drink containing some form of non-nutritive sweetener. Combating or fuel Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Is it possible to eat sweets when you have diabetes? The answer is "yes." But when you’re trying to satisfy your sweet tooth, it can be hard to know what to reach for at the grocery store (sugar-free this or low-calorie that). So, use this primer to help you choose wisely. The Sweet Facts When you’re comparing sweeteners, keep these things in mind: Sugars are naturally occurring carbohydrates. These include brown sugar, cane sugar, confectioners’ sugar, fructose, honey, and molasses. They have calories and raise your blood glucose levels (the level of sugar in your blood). Reduced-calorie sweeteners are sugar alcohols. You might know these by names like isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol. You'll often find them in sugar-free candy and gum. They have about half the calories of sugars and can raise your blood sugar levels, although not as much as other carbohydrates. Artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods." They were designed in a lab, have no calories, and do not raise your blood sugar levels. Types of Artificial Sweeteners Artificial low-calorie sweeteners include: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sugar Twin). You can use it in both hot and cold foods. Avoid this sweetener if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal). You can use it in both cold and warm foods. It may lose some sweetness at high temperatures. People who have a condition called phenylketonuria should avoid this sweetener. Acesulfame potassium or ace-K (Sweet One, Swiss Sweet, Sunett). You can use it in both cold and hot foods, including in baking and cooking. Sucralose (Splenda). You can use it in hot and cold foods, including in baking and cooking. Processed foods often contain it. Advantame can be used in baked goods, soft drinks and other non-alcoholic bev Continue reading >>

Is Aspartame Really Safer In Reducing The Risk Of Hypoglycemia During Exercise In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Aspartame Really Safer In Reducing The Risk Of Hypoglycemia During Exercise In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

In addition to physical activity and healthy food choices, low-calorie sweetening agents, such as aspartame, are a recommended alternative to sugar for patients with type 2 diabetes in order to obtain a better control of carbohydrate intake and blood glucose levels (1–3). The safety of aspartame has been a controversial issue for quite some time now. This noncarbohydrate sweetener is currently found in over 6,000 food products and beverages throughout the world. At present, its attractiveness as an artificial sweetener in the dietary management of diabetes is related to its ∼200-fold sweetening power and the lack of effect on plasma glucose levels compared with sucrose. We have recently investigated the effect of different macronutrient compositions on plasma glucose and insulin levels during an acute bout of exercise in 14 men with type 2 diabetes. We compared the same subjects in random order in five different conditions: 1) high–glycemic index sucrose meal, 2) low–glycemic index fructose meal (both of which are matched for total calories [455 kcal], macronutrient composition, and taste), 3) aspartame meal (358 kcal), 4) high-fat/low-carbohydrate meal (also containing 455 kcal), and 5) fasting. We hypothesized that using fructose or aspartame instead of sucrose would have a lower impact on insulin release and glucose response than a sucrose-sweetened meal. Contrary to all expectation, the aspartame breakfast induced a similar rise in glucose and insulin levels at baseline than the sucrose meal, even if the aspartame meal had the same taste, and was 22% lower in calories and 10% lower in carbohydrates, with an inferior glycemic index. Indeed, the most dramatic reduction in plasma glucose level occurred in those with the highest 2-h postprandial plasma glucose l Continue reading >>

Aspartame: Should Individuals With Type Ii Diabetes Be Taking It?

Aspartame: Should Individuals With Type Ii Diabetes Be Taking It?

Curr Diabetes Rev. 2017 May 31. doi: 10.2174/1573399813666170601093336. [Epub ahead of print] Aspartame: should individuals with Type II Diabetes be taking it? Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria. South Africa. Individuals with type II diabetes (T2D) have to manage blood glucose levels to sustain health and longevity. Artificial sweeteners (including aspartame) are suggested sugar alternatives for these individuals. The safety of aspartame in particular, has long been the centre of debate. Although it is such a controversial product, many clinicians recommend its use to T2D patients, during a controlled diet and as part of an intervention strategy. Aspartame is 200 times sweeter than sugar and has a negligible effect on blood glucose levels, and it is suggested for use so that T2D can control carbohydrate intake and blood glucose levels. However, research suggests that aspartame intake may lead to an increased risk of weight gain rather than weight loss, and cause impaired blood glucose tolerance in T2D. This review consolidates knowledge gained from studies that link aspartame consumption to the various mechanisms associated with T2D. We review literature that provides evidence that raise concerns that aspartame may exacerbate T2D and add to the global burden of disease. Aspartame may act as a chemical stressor by increasing cortisol levels, and may induce systemic oxidative stress by producing excess free radicals, and it may also alter gut microbial activity and interfere with the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, resulting in insulin deficiency or resistance. Aspartame and its metabolites are safe for T2D is still debatable due to a lack of consistent data. More research is required that provides evid Continue reading >>

Sugar Substitutes: Aspartame

Sugar Substitutes: Aspartame

Chances are you’ve tried a beverage or food that contains a “nonnutritive” sweetener. Nonnutritive sweeteners are substances that are used in place of sugar, including table sugar, honey, maple syrup, or corn syrup. Sometimes called artificial sweeteners or sugar substitutes, nonnutritive sweeteners are found in many products, such as foods, beverages, chewing gum, mouthwashes, toothpaste, and medicines. These sweeteners are extremely popular because they contain little, if any, calories and carbohydrate, making them a helpful choice for people who have diabetes and/or who are overweight. Because their sweetening ability is so intense, only small amounts of nonnutritive sweeteners need to be used to provide the same level of sweetness as nutritive, or caloric, sweeteners. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved six nonnutritive sweeteners, which include aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, advantame, saccharin, and sucralose. (Certain extracts of the stevia plant and monk fruit also have “generally recognized as safe” status from the FDA.) Not surprisingly, perhaps, most of these sweeteners have raised a lot controversy and concern about their safety and possible effects on health. This week, we’ll take a closer look at one of the more popular and prevalent sweeteners, aspartame. What is aspartame? Better known as Equal or NutraSweet, aspartame is found in soft drinks, yogurt, gum and cereals. Discovered in 1965, aspartame is roughly 200 times sweeter than regular table sugar, or sucrose. It’s made up of two amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which are naturally occurring amino acids. When aspartame is metabolized, or broken down in the body, it forms a small amount of methanol. Methanol formation is concerning to some people because la Continue reading >>

New Study Reevaluates Aspartame As A Safe Sweetener

New Study Reevaluates Aspartame As A Safe Sweetener

A new study has reviewed evidence in animals and humans about the health effects and safety of the low-calorie sweetener aspartame at currently accepted dosage and at higher dosage. Previous research suggest artificial sweeteners like aspartame can help weight loss and may benefit people with type 2 diabetes as they've been deemed as good or even superior to water for blood sugar control. However, researchers have long debated both its recommended safe dosage (40 mg per kg of bodyweight per day) and its potential adverse effects. In this new paper, researchers from the University of Pretoria and Stellenbosch University, in South Africa, have reviewed both animal and human aspartame trials published in the last ten years or so. Many of these earlier studies concluded that aspartame consumption was not a concern at acceptable daily intake (ADI) levels, especially based on current use levels which equate to about 15 per cent of the ADI for the average adult. To put this into perspective, given that a can of diet coke has 125mg of aspartame, someone who weighs 150 pounds would have to drink 21.8 cans of the drink daily before going over the safe consumption level. Yet there are several points of potential danger that the authors of the current research are still concerned about. Although the data has been controversial and inconsistent, aspartame may modulate brain neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin, and be neurotoxic because of one of its byproducts (phenylalanine) crossing the blood-brain barrier fairly easily. Researchers also suggest that, when consumed in quantities higher than the ADI or within safe levels, aspartame can increase oxidative stress and inflammation in many different cell types and tissues. These "pro-inflammatory" effects and associated da Continue reading >>

The Truth About Aspartame Side Effects

The Truth About Aspartame Side Effects

Aspartame is one of the most popular artificial sweeteners available on the market. In fact, chances are good that you or someone you know has consumed an aspartame-containing diet soda within the past 24 hours. In 2010, one-fifth of all Americans drank a diet soda on any given day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the sweetener remains popular, it’s also faced controversy in recent years. Many opponents have claimed that aspartame is actually bad for your health. There are also claims about long-term repercussions of aspartame consumption. Unfortunately, while extensive tests have been conducted on aspartame, there’s no consensus as to whether aspartame is “bad” for you. Aspartame is sold under the brand names NutraSweet and Equal. It’s also used widely in packaged products — especially those labeled as “diet” foods. The ingredients of aspartame are aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Both are naturally occurring amino acids. Aspartic acid is produced by your body and phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that you get from food. When your body processes aspartame, part of it is broken down into methanol. Although toxic in large quantities, small quantities of methanol aren’t toxic. It’s naturally produced by the body and is also found in fruit, fruit juice, fermented beverages, and some vegetables. The amount of methanol resulting from the breakdown of aspartame is low. In fact, it’s far lower than the amount found in many common foods. A number of regulatory agencies and health-related organizations have weighed in favorably on aspartame. It’s gained approval from the: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization World Health Organization American Heart Association Am Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Sweeteners

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners are always a “hot topic” and many people tend to have strong feelings about them, one way or another. It seems like every other month we get a report on the latest study on what artificial sweeteners do or don’t do to us. The data alternates between saying artificial sweeteners are good for us or they are going to kill us – so which is it? It can be hard to know what to believe and what to do, especially if you have diabetes and see artificial sweeteners as a healthy alternative. They seem like a great option for lowering calories and carbohydrates, but are they too good to be true? Let’s look at some of the claims, myths and facts related to artificial sweeteners. We’ll start with the basics. The Background and the Basics Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, were originally created to help people lose weight and manage diabetes. They were thought to be a great alternative. Saccharin was the first artificial sweetener, accidentally discovered by scientists at John’s Hopkins. Eventually there were concerns over the safety of saccharin based on studies done in rodents. Even though the FDA was leaning toward banning it, but they didn’t, and it was partially because of consumer uproar over that possibility. The final ruling was that saccharin was only required to have a warning label about cancer, but could remain on the market. In 2000, the warning label was removed because they could only prove its carcinogenic affect in rodents and not in humans. You will still find saccharin “the pink packet” on the market today. Now, we have a total of 8 sugar substitutes. There are two different kinds, nutritive and non-nutritive. Nutritive means it adds to the caloric value of food and it contains more than 2% of the amount o Continue reading >>

Correcting Internet Myths About Aspartame

Correcting Internet Myths About Aspartame

An article circulating on the Internet has called into question the safety of aspartame. To the best of our knowledge, none of the symptoms the writer and her "sources" have attributed to aspartame have been proven in any clinical scientific studies. We would like to respond to her comments to assure people with diabetes, who use products with aspartame, that we are unaware of any credible scientific evidence that aspartame is associated with any of the adverse effects noted in the Internet communication. Aspartame is made up of two amino acids called aspartic acid and the methyl ester of phenylalanine. Amino acids and methyl esters are found naturally in foods like milk, meats, fruits and vegetables. When digested, the body handles the amino acids in aspartame in the same way as those in foods we eat daily. Although aspartame can be used by the whole family, individuals with a rare genetic disease called phenylketonuria (PKU) need to be aware that aspartame is a source of the protein component, phenylalanine. Those who have PKU cannot properly metabolize phenylalanine and must monitor their intake of phenylalanine from all foods, including foods containing aspartame. In the U.S., every infant is screened for PKU at birth. The Internet myth "Especially deadly for diabetics": there is no question that aspartame has been beneficial to people with diabetes, enabling them to enjoy sweet tasting foods without the carbohydrates. Since it does not contain calories in the usual amounts consumed, it cannot affect blood glucose levels or cause weight gain. The facts An 8-oz glass of milk has six times more phenylalanine and thirteen times more aspartic acid than an equivalent amount of soda sweetened with NutraSweet. An 8-oz glass of fruit juice or tomato juice contains three to Continue reading >>

Aspartame's Hidden Dangers

Aspartame's Hidden Dangers

Aspartame can be found in over 6,000 products. While its manufacturers claim that it is safe, numerous studies link it to numerous serious complications There is very little awareness regarding aspartame side effects because these are not widely reported by the media and most people do not associate their symptoms with long-term use of aspartame Aspartame's approval proves that chemical and pharmaceutical companies can manipulate government agencies, "bribe" health organizations, and flood the scientific community with fraudulent and manipulated studies Even today, nothing is done to prevent aspartame from inflicting damage on the health of the American population. The problem isn't limited to the US, however. The sweetener is currently used in over 70 countries worldwide If a product is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and composed of natural ingredients, would you assume it is safe to consume? If the same product is an artificial sweetener, would you assume it helps control your weight? Millions of people use aspartame, the artificial sweetener known as NutraSweet, with these assumptions in mind. Aspartame can be found in over 6,000 products i (often sugar-free or diet products), such as: Pharmaceuticals and supplements, including over-the-counter medicines However, aspartame's tainted history of approval and potentially toxic ingredients cast serious doubt on the safety of this sugar substitute. Furthermore, aspartame may actually increase your appetite and risk for weight gain ii . While the FDA approval may signal the green light for safe consumption, 85 percent of all complaints registered with the FDA are for adverse reactions to aspartame, including five reported deaths. A closer look at the unscientific studies, suspicious approval methods, a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes