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Diabetes And Anxiety

Tips For Managing Diabetes And Anxiety

Tips For Managing Diabetes And Anxiety

A few weeks ago I was in Siem Reap, Cambodia, with one of my oldest and closest friends. After an amazing day hiking and visiting the temples of Angkor Watt, we rewarded ourselves with a nice dinner in town. After programming my pump for my dinner bolus, as I returned to chatting with my friend, I felt the familiar feeling of my insulin pump vibrating. When it continued beyond the normal length, I double-checked. “Button Error.” During my entire 12 years of using an insulin pump, I had never received this error. I didn’t even know what it meant. Soon after, my pump stopped working and major anxiety set in. Anxiety is normal part of life, for everyone. Symptoms of anxiety include general feelings of worry, being “keyed up,” or on edge, racing heart and sweating. In the most basic form, anxiety is our body’s way of telling us to pay attention, because something important, fearful or unusual is going on. In many situations, anxiety is adaptive and helpful. Anxiety before a test can motivate us to study and anxiety about walking down a street alone at night can help deter us from potentially dangerous situations. For individuals with diabetes, anxiety is an extremely common issue. Not only do we have to all of life’s normal issues to contend with, but we also have the stress and anxiety that come with managing a chronic disease. Even in situations less severe than the one I described above, feelings anxiety related to the complexity and expense of self-management and blood sugar control, potential long-term complications, and hyperglycemic or hypoglycemic episodes are common. When anxiety becomes severe and overly intrusive, an anxiety disorder is often diagnosed. Anxiety disorders are also common among individuals with diabetes, and 13% of young adults with d Continue reading >>

Anxiety And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence From The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

Anxiety And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence From The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study Lauren E. Edwards, MPH and Briana Mezuk, PhD Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristic Continue reading >>

My Balancing Act

My Balancing Act

Being diagnosed with Type 1 during my sophomore year of high school was brutal in many ways, and only added to the depth of my issues with anxiety that were already in place. As far back as I can remember, I had always had social anxiety. I could never seem to connect with my peers. Having a father who has always been in the Major League Baseball industry, I was always traveling, and was constantly around adults. I grew up a bit quicker than I should have, I suppose. Which, in turn, gave me a certain level of independence and maturity that proved very useful when I was diagnosed with Type 1. The first couple of months with Type 1 were surprisingly okay. I was taught by wonderful diabetes educators and doctors at Phoenix Childrens Hospital, and I felt confident that I could handle it like a pro. I calculated my carb ratio with whatever I was eating, gave myself my novalog, (along with my lantus in the evenings) and I was good to go. My honeymoon stage aided in my consistently great blood sugars. I would go to the nurses office at my school every day right before lunchtime and take my blood sugar and give myself my insulin with the other Type 1 diabetics at my school. (There were about six of us.) I definitely felt supported. I still remember the day that my diabetes anxiety finally reared its ugly head. I was sitting in my English class and I suddenly felt dizzy and disoriented. I normally kept my blood sugar meter in the nurses office, but luckily I had a spare in my bag. I discreetly checked myself under my desk. I wasnt dangerously low, but I was in the low 80s. I breathed a sigh of relief, but asked to be excused to the nurses office. For some reason that day all of the complications and potential future lows, highs, and other related emergencies came flooding into Continue reading >>

Stress Related To Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Stress Related To Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Almost three million Americans are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes annually. Formerly known as juvenile diabetes, type 1 affects mostly children, but adults have also been diagnosed. Those with type 1 cannot produce their own insulin, a hormone that regulates sugar levels in the blood. Thus, they must inject insulin into their bodies to compensate for the absence. When glycated haemoglobin, or HbA1c, levels in the blood are above average, patients are diagnosed with diabetes. After diagnosis, the lives for type 1 diabetics can be difficult to manage with all the daily insulin injections and careful diet monitoring. Such drastically adjusted schedules often take away from one's quality of life. This can lead to more health issues such as anxiety and depression. Led by Ragnhild Bjarkøy Strandberg, a study published in the September 2014 issue of Journal of Psychosomatic Research sought to determine if there was a relationship between the emotional distress revolving around diabetes and levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Studying Levels of Emotional Distress in Diabetics Recruited from an outpatient clinic, 235 individuals from ages 18 to 69 with type 1 diabetes participated in the study. Of the sample, 135 were male and 100 were female. Blood samples were taken from all participants to measure HbA1c levels. The average HbA1c level for the sample was 8.1%—the average level for someone without diabetes ranges from 4.5% to 6.5%. After HbA1c levels were recorded, Strandberg assessed levels of emotional distress using the following tools: Problem Areas in Diabetes Survey (PAID): 20-item survey assessing emotional responses. Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS): 17-item scale measuring emotional burdens, physician-related stress, regimen-related stress, and diabetes-related stress. H Continue reading >>

Anxiety Symptoms In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Association With Blood Glucose Monitoring And Glycemic Control

Anxiety Symptoms In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Association With Blood Glucose Monitoring And Glycemic Control

Objective To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms and their association with blood glucose monitoring (BGM) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods 276 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Adolescents completed a measure of depressive symptoms. Demographic and family characteristics were obtained from caregiver report. Diabetes duration, regimen type, BGM frequency, and glycemic control were also collected. Results Trait anxiety symptoms that suggest further clinical assessment is needed were present in 17% of adolescents; the rate was 13% for state anxiety symptoms. Higher levels of state anxiety symptoms were associated with less frequent BGM F(14, 261) = 6.35, p < .0001, R2 = .25, and suboptimal glycemic control, F(15, 260) = 7.97, p < .0001, R2 = .32. State anxiety symptoms were correlates of BGM frequency and glycemic control independent of depressive symptoms. Conclusions State anxiety symptoms are associated with less frequent BGM and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Objective Examine relationships between parental depressive symptoms, affective and instrumental parenting practices, youth depressive symptoms and glycemic control in a diverse, urban sample of adolescents with diabetes. Methods Sixty-one parents and youth aged 10–17 completed self-report questionnaires. HbA1c assays were obtained to assess metabolic control. Path analysis was used to test a model where parenting variables mediated the relationship between parental and youth depressive symptoms and had effects on metabolic control. Results Parental depressive symptoms had a significant indirect effect on youth depressive symptoms through parental involvement. Youth depressive symptoms were significa Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anxiety

Diabetes And Anxiety

Tweet Anxiety can be defined as a fear-based mental state, normally felt as a discomforting emotional state accompanied with physical sensations in the body. Anxiety based mental disorders (i.e. people diagnosed with SAD or GAD) are people who appear anxious about almost everything. This has a detrimental effect on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities. What are the symptoms of anxiety? Symptoms include excessive worry and unnecessary anxiety for numerous activities with symptoms being present and continuous for a minimum of 6 months. Anxiety is difficult to control and is accompanied by somatic symptoms including: Shaking Heart palpitations Excessive perspiration Crying Often it will be a state of mind that is reached after years of dealing with the condition. People diagnosed with diabetes are approximately 20% more likely to suffer from anxiety than those without diabetes. [33] What are the causes of anxiety? Being diagnosed with diabetes can instigate anxiety in a number of ways. People with diabetes may potentially be anxious about how their condition will be perceived by others including friends, family and work colleagues. Anxiety may also arise over what could happen if they were experience a hypo while driving or whilst looking after their children. Excessive worrying can lead to social anxiety. Symptoms of social anxiety include Being fearful of leaving the house or place of comfort Anxiety of being around people, known or strangers Avoidance of social interaction Why might I be anxious? People diagnosed with diabetes may be anxious about the long term implications of their condition. Greater than 70%, of diabetics could develop macrovascular conditions including heart attack and stroke. Furthermore, between 5% and 10% are reported to experie Continue reading >>

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Diabetes and issues with blood sugar are all over the news. Every day there are more and more reports of the effects that foods and chemicals have on your long term health, and it's not uncommon to worry about developing these types of problems. That's why so many people with anxiety wonder if they have hypoglycemia - or low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in the body, starving the brain. This article explores whether or not hypoglycemia may be causing your anxiety and how. You Can Manage Hypoglycemia Anxiety Even if your anxiety is related to your blood sugar levels, you can control it with the right anxiety treatments. Take my anxiety test to look at the symptoms of your anxiety and recommend an effective treatment option. Worried About Hypoglycemia? See a Doctor Your blood sugar is one of the easiest things to diagnose. You can take a simple blood test after fasting for 12 hours and have results in no time. So if you're worried about your blood sugar, talk to your doctor. You should also take my free anxiety test to find out more about your anxiety. Health Causes of Anxiety Most people that suffer from anxiety worry that it has a physical cause. In fact, one of the main problems affecting those with anxiety attacks is the constant, nagging feeling that the physical symptoms are too severe to be something as "harmless" as anxiety, and they often look for other explanations for why they may be feeling these symptoms. First, you need to remember that anxiety causes you to think this way. Anxiety alters thought processes so that "worst case scenario" thinking is more common. In addition, anxiety symptoms can be incredibly severe, and genuinely mimic the symptoms of major health disorders. As much as it may seem hard to believe, your symp Continue reading >>

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

Dealing with diabetes puts a lot of attention on blood glucose monitoring and insulin and medications—and those are important, of course. But there is an emotional side to diabetes and effects on your mental health that should be addressed, too. Diabetes interrupts your workday when you have to check your blood glucose. Diabetes means you can't just grab food whenever you want—you have to plan for it. Diabetes prolongs getting ready in the morning as you wash and inspect your feet. Diabetes frustrates you when your taste buds cry out for a pastry instead of an apple. Diabetes makes you worry about your future. All of the time, effort, money, and stress interrupts your emotional stability and introduces emotional complications—and it's okay to be frustrated or overwhelmed or scared. Diabetes and "Being in Control" Let's face it: most of us like being in control, and we don't like feeling that anything is out of our control. When it comes to diabetes, you can feel simultaneously in control and out of control. Out of control: Because of how diabetes affects your body, it is possible to feel that nothing is in your control anymore. You can't eat what you want when you want. You have to take medications or give yourself injections. You can start, perhaps, to feel that your body isn't your own anymore. How to counteract that "out of control" feeling: Taking a step back and an objective look at the situation may help. You can say to yourself, "Yes, diabetes makes me do these things, but diabetes does not run my life." A mantra along those lines—repeated at moments when you're feeling particularly out of control—can help. Also, you can do a mental mind shift: all these steps you're taking to manage your diabetes are actually proactive, healthy steps. You are taking co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Associated With Anxiety Symptoms

Diabetes Is Associated With Anxiety Symptoms

Research shows that moderate-to-severe anxiety symptoms, an indication of a potential anxiety disorder, affect one in five people with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and one in six with type 1 diabetes or non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes. Dr Adriana Ventura, Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes (ACBRD) and registered psychologist, who conducted the study, says the prevalence of elevated anxiety symptoms and disorders in people with diabetes is within the range of general population estimates. However, having anxiety and diabetes poses additional challenges. “Living with diabetes can be difficult enough, managing healthy living, medications and monitoring, and fitting these into daily life. Experiencing anxiety as well adds to the burden, and can impact on both their medical outcomes and quality of life,” said Dr Ventura. Detecting anxiety among people with diabetes can be difficult, as some of the symptoms share similar physical symptoms to hypoglycaemia (high blood glucose levels). The relationship between diabetes and anxiety disorders needs to be further explored. For some people, diabetes may be completely unrelated to their anxiety – they just coexist – while for others, it may be that living with diabetes leads to feelings of anxiety. In response to the research, a resource from the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) highlights the impact of anxiety on diabetes management, and how to identify elevated anxiety symptoms. The resource, which was developed by the ACBRD in collaboration with Diabetes Australia, is titled: Diabetes and emotional health: A handbook for health professionals supporting adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Dr Christel Hendrieckx, Senior Research Fellow and a clinical psychologist Continue reading >>

Anxiety Disorder In Life With Diabetes

Anxiety Disorder In Life With Diabetes

Have you ever had a panic attack? In a life with type 1 diabetes and Generalized Anxiety Disorder, I’ve come to know all too well the feeling of paranoia, panic, and an intense fear I can barely describe. Your blood sugar level is one of the major components that makes you function as a human being. To be able to do everyday things. Cook, clean, eat, work, pee, sleep, care for your children, drive your car, walk your dog, everything. If you have diabetes, there is no avoiding it. It’s there in your face all the time, dictating what you do and how you feel physically. Now imagine being afraid of knowing what your blood sugar level is. How are you supposed to go about your daily routine? For the past 5 years, I have been trying my best to ‘avoid’ diabetes. It’s an intense fear I have and so I have tried to ‘avoid’ it and live a ‘normal’ life. The fear was so crippling that I just wanted to make it better, make it go away, instead of facing up to it and working through it. For 5 years I didn’t check my blood sugar or take my insulin properly. I was constantly high and feeling very sick – and still scared, no less. A panic attack is an awful experience. Having a real fear of something is an awful way to spend your time. But most people go on living their lives with those fears of spiders, heights and blood, and manage pretty well, too. When those situations come up, you just avoid them, have your episode, and continue with your day. Sometimes to relieve the pressure you pull your hair, or you squeeze your own hand so hard that you cut off blood supply. You start to cry and your feet can barely hold you up. You have this excruciating pain in your chest from your heart beating so frantically and your breathing being so off. Imagine if your fear wasn’t Continue reading >>

Anxiety And Diabetes: Innovative Approaches To Management In Primary Care

Anxiety And Diabetes: Innovative Approaches To Management In Primary Care

Go to: Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. Keywords: Diabetes, anxiety, primary care, comorbidity, collaborative care Go to: Introduction Disparities Type 2 diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus affects approximately 29.18 million persons in the United States, which accounts for 9.3% of the American population.1 Individuals with diabetes have difficulty producing insulin and/or effectively utilizing the insulin that the body generates. As a result, glucose accumulates in t Continue reading >>

Anxiety

Anxiety

It’s normal to feel anxious or worried at times. Everyone does. In fact, a moderate amount of anxiety can be good. It helps you respond appropriately to real danger, and it can help motivate you to excel at work and at home. But if you often feel anxious without reason and your worries disrupt your daily life, you may have an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders cause excessive or unrealistic anxiety and worry about life circumstances, usually without a readily identifiable cause. Little is known about the relationship between diabetes and anxiety. Recent evidence suggests that the rate of anxiety disorders is elevated in people with type 1 diabetes. It is estimated that 14% of people with diabetes have generalized anxiety disorder. As many as 40% of people have at least some anxiety symptoms, and fear of hypoglycemia is not uncommon in those with diabetes. Anxiety disorders in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes may be associated with poor blood sugar control. Signs & symptoms of anxiety The signs and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder can vary in combination or severity. They may include: Restlessness Feeling of being tense or on edge Feeling a lump in your throat Difficulty concentrating Fatigue Irritability Impatience Being easily distracted Muscle tension Trouble falling or staying asleep (insomnia) Excessive sweating Shortness of breath Stomach ache Diarrhea Headache Treatment of anxiety The two main treatments for anxiety disorders are medication (anti-anxiety drugs and/or anti-depressants) and psychotherapy ("talk therapy"), either alone or in combination. If you have difficulty controlling your worries, or if anxiety interferes with your daily life, speak with your doctor, diabetes health-care team or mental health professional. Continue reading >>

Study Links Anxiety And Diabetes

Study Links Anxiety And Diabetes

Diabetes and anxiety in U.S. adults: findings from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, by C. Li and colleagues. Diabetic Medicine 25: 878-881, 2008 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? There are 12 types of common and disabling mental health problems that are related to anxiety. These problems can hurt a person's well-being and ability to function. For people with diabetes, anxiety problems can make taking care of their disease more difficult. Little is known about the relationship between diabetes and anxiety problems. Why did researchers do this particular study? The researchers wanted to find out if anxiety problems are more common among people with diabetes than among the general public. The study included more than 200,000 adults with and without diabetes who participated in a large nationwide study on behavior and mental health. The researchers collected information about how many of the subjects had diabetes and anxiety problems and estimated the percentages of people with and without diabetes who are likely to develop anxiety problems. After taking many other factors into account, people with diabetes were 20 percent more likely than those without diabetes to have an anxiety condition at some point in their lifetime. Adults under age 30 and Hispanics had the highest rates of anxiety problems. Information about anxiety problems came from the patients based on their answers to one question on the survey. These answers may not have been accurate. Also, because of the study design, the researchers were able to find a link between the diabetes and anxiety but could not find out which one might develop first or how each affects the other. There is a strong link between diabetes and anxiety problems, especially among Hispanics and yo Continue reading >>

Anxiety Disorders In Adults With Diabetes Mellitus.

Anxiety Disorders In Adults With Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Anxiety disorders are common among patients with diabetes and appear to recur in a substantial proportion of cases. The presence of generalized anxiety disorder is associated with both poorer glucose control and the increased report of clinical symptoms of diabetes. A complex interactive model best accommodates observations from psychiatric-diabetic research, one wherein diabetes may affect psychiatric status or vice versa in an independent or reciprocal fashion. No information from systematic studies is available currently to determine if treatment of the psychiatric disorder will have a beneficial impact on glucose regulation, despite the direct clinical relevance of such information to management of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Struggles With Panic Attacks

Struggles With Panic Attacks

First, I want to address a question that Envoy posted on my blog entry from two weeks ago. Envoy asked if I thought that depression was more common in people who have diabetes. The first answer is that I have always believed it is more common, and research has also indicated that it’s twice as likely to occur in people who have diabetes. That is part of the reason I suggest a yearly mental health checkup in conjunction with your annual physical. The percentage of people with diabetes who experience depression is quite significant, in the range of 20%. Hopefully, your health-care professional asks you questions about your moods, energy level, activities, sleep, and connections with other people at appointments. An open discussion of this type can give him or her enough information to begin an assessment for depression. It makes sense that controlling diabetes would be made more difficult if depression is left untreated. However, fewer than 25% of cases of depression in people with diabetes are recognized and treated appropriately. We clearly have a lot of work to do in improving mental health care for people with diabetes. Another mental health issue that has been shown to interfere with people’s diabetes control is panic disorder. Panic disorder is characterized by unpredictable, excessive fear or terror accompanied by a number of physical symptoms. Symptoms may include pounding heart, palpitations, sweating, difficulty breathing, numbness or tingling sensations, chest pain, dizziness, nausea, trembling or shaking, and chills or hot flashes. Many of these are similar to symptoms of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, and they could also resemble a heart attack. Therefore, a person may overreact (by visiting the emergency room, for example) or, thinking that his symp Continue reading >>

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