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Diabetes And Aging Process

Healthy Aging With Diabetes

Healthy Aging With Diabetes

“I can tell you one thing — growing old ain’t for wimps!” —gray-haired gentleman at Sterling Center YMCA in Beverly, Massachusetts It used to be said that having diabetes aged people an additional 20 years. Today, thanks to better tools for managing diabetes and preventing and treating its complications, people with diabetes have the opportunity to live longer than ever before. However, managing diabetes in the golden years presents a variety of challenges, ranging from increased insulin resistance to being on multiple drugs. Here is what you should know about the effects of diabetes on aging and vice versa, and what you can do to stay healthy and full of vitality well into old age. What happens during aging As you age, you may be most aware of your new gray hairs and wrinkles, but aging causes changes throughout the entire body. A person’s basal metabolic rate — the amount of energy the body expends at rest — declines with age. By some estimates, a person’s basal metabolism drops by 2% per decade starting at age 20. Some researchers believe that this decline is due almost solely to the loss of muscle mass that comes with age. The body’s ability to process oxygen — its aerobic capacity — also declines with age. By some estimates, a person’s aerobic capacity by age 65 is typically only 60% to 70% of what it was when he was younger (although the decline appears to be less in older people who exercise regularly). This decline may be due to several factors, including poor lung function, heart function, and blood circulation. With advancing years, the body gradually becomes less adept at taking up and using glucose from the bloodstream — a condition known as glucose intolerance, which sets the stage for Type 2 diabetes. One contributing factor to Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Ages, The Destroyer Of Cells

Type 2 Diabetic Ages, The Destroyer Of Cells

Type 2 Diabetic AGEs, The Destroyer of Cells Type 2 diabetic AGEs are found in every organ damaged by diabetes. That is why you need to know what they are and what you can do about them. AGEs are the catchy name for advanced glycation end products. This high sounding scientific name means one thing. Science has found the enemy that accelerates aging in the human body. Type 2 diabetic AGEs enter the cells, causing damage wherever they go. Diabetes is only one of the diseases that can be blamed on them. The heart, liver, kidneys, brain and blood vessels show tissue damage caused by AGEs in everything from heart disease to Alzheimer dementia. Searching for the cause of high blood sugar and its role in diabetic complications, researchers studied red blood cells and noted the amount of sticky glucose that attached to them. Some glucose attached in the proper places and was carried to the cells for energy. Other glucose seemed to be sticking randomly, causing the red blood cells to be damaged. Those studies led to the hemoglobin A1C test, where the levels of glycation were measured in a diabetic. We have learned that a lower HgA1C means fewer complications from diabetes. Why? Because a high percentage of glycated hemoglobin accelerates the aging process. The more random glucose is sticking to the red blood cells, the more damage is done. Researchers also found that this sticky glucose problem was reversible. If they reduced the amount of available simple sugar, the red blood cells had fewer AGEs. Higher glucose made more. Lower glucose made less. Since red blood cells live two or three months they can give your doctor a true picture of how well controlled your blood sugar has been over that time. The hemoglobin A1C test is a great way to measure blood sugar averages over two Continue reading >>

Physiological Changes In Older Adults And Their Effect On Diabetes Treatment

Physiological Changes In Older Adults And Their Effect On Diabetes Treatment

Physiological Changes in Older Adults and Their Effect on Diabetes Treatment Copyright 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Physiological changes associated with aging have the potential to affect the treatment of diabetes. However, evidence regarding treatment of diabetes in geriatric patients has been limited, especially for oldest-old patients. Recent research has provided greater insight into the risks and benefits of treatment, and new guidelines provide more specific information regarding treatment goals in older people with diabetes and encourage greater individualization of treatment. Geriatric patients make up an important part of the overall diabetes population. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that, including undiagnosed patients, 10.9 million, or 26.9% of the population 65 years of age have diabetes. 1 One challenge in treating geriatric patients is that this group can have a wide range of ages and medical conditions. For example, one geriatric patient could be a 65-year-old man who has been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and has mild hypertension and hyperlipidemia but who is otherwise healthy, whereas another patient could be an 86-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes for several years, an A1C of 8.6%, and concurrent conditions, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, arthritis, and vision and hearing impairments. Given this level of heterogeneity, it is important to identify in all patients any changes associated with aging and to consider how these circumstances will affect treatment as aging continues. More specifically defining the term geriatric can aid in this process. Although the age of 60 or 65 years is often used as the defining criterion, there can be significant differ Continue reading >>

Aging Gracefully As Possible With Diabetes

Aging Gracefully As Possible With Diabetes

Aging Gracefully As Possible With Diabetes At some point each of us, whatever our diet and activity habits are, begins to notice signs of aging. The outward signs, such as gray hairs, and skin wrinkles reflect internal changes occurring throughout the body. Our cells, for instance, may become less adept at utilizing the glucose in our bloodstream. If aging body tissue becomes increasingly insensitive to insulin, the hormone that shuttles glucose into our cells for fuel, blood sugar levels rise. This is why many middle-agers see their doctor for an annual physical and receive an unexpected diagnosis of pre-diabetes, or type 2 diabetes (T2D). Not only is T2D a possible consequence of aging, the effects of elevated blood sugar - with type 1 or 2 diabetes - may contribute to the aging process, for instance: The glucose in our bloodstream binds to proteins throughout the body (called non-enzymatic glycation). The glucose and protein molecules chemically interact and produce by-products, such as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Since AGEs do not breakdown they accumulate in the body. AGEs readily combine with other molecules and form bonds called cross-links. Cross-links make our blood vessels, cells, and tissues stiff, and less functionalor even dysfunctional. AGEs are also a likely factor in the onset of diabetes complications, including cardiovascular problems, and diabetes-related eye, nerve, and kidney disease. In turn, diabetes complications speed the aging process by eroding eye, nerve, kidney, and cardiovascular functions. Fortunately, good glucose management makes a significant, positive difference in how long, and how well we live. If you doubt that, consider the result of a long term Danish study involving middle aged (average age 55), overweight or nearly o Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Premature Aging

Blood Sugar And Premature Aging

Sugareven small amounts speeds up the aging process Blood Sugar, Insulin and AgingThe Damaging Effects of Sugar Besides the formation of the highly destructive AGEs , sugar, in all forms (fructose, sucrose, glucose, galactose, lactose and others) has other ways of inflicting serious damage to your body and speeding up the aging process. Fructose is the worst of all sugars, but all forms of sugar that affect your bodys blood sugar levels, as well as the resulting insulin can be harmful. According to Dr. Joseph Mercola: Fructose in particular is extremely pro-inflammatory, promoting AGEs and speeding up the aging process. It also promotes the kind of dangerous growth of fat cells around your vital organs that are the hallmark of diabetes and heart disease. In one study, 16 volunteers on a high-fructose diet produced new fat cells around their heart, liver and other digestive organs in just 10 weeks. So the internally and externally, limiting sugar in all forms, will go a long way towards slowing down the aging process. Sugar, especially fructose and sucrose, increase insulin and leptin levels, while decreasing your bodys ability to effectively counteract that rise in blood sugar. This is a major cause of degenerative diseases. Sugar also weakens or paralyzes the immune system, making your more susceptible to infectious disease, or complications of minor diseases. For example, that minor cold can become the flu, pneumonia or bronchitisand in some cases deadly if you are elderly and in frail health. The average American eating a stereotypical Standard American Diet consumes 2.5 pounds of sugar a WEEK. And when you think about adding in the other processed foods such as white or wheat bread, pasta, pastries, and all the refined carbohydrates, which turn into sugar in the bo Continue reading >>

Considering Why Type 2 Diabetes Is An Age-related Condition

Considering Why Type 2 Diabetes Is An Age-related Condition

Permalink | Read 2 Comments | Add a Comment | Share | Posted by Reason Type 2 diabetes is the poster child for an avoidable age-related condition : barring the worst of genetic bad luck, calorie restricted , well exercised people will not suffer from type 2 diabetes. But this is, undeniably, an age-related illness. Becoming ever more obese and sedentary will hasten the onset of diabetes into ever earlier years of life, but older obese and sedentary people are still far more likely to suffer type 2 diabetes than are equally overweight and sedentary younger counterparts. So while failing to take care of your health at any age is just another form of self-harm, there are other, less avoidable processes taking place at the level of cells and organs that make older people more vulnerable. Here is an open access paper that reviews what researchers presently know of the decline of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas - which turns out to be not enough, as is still true of so much of our biochemistry. There are changes, cataloged and identified, but the chains of causation for those changes are poorly understood at best. Type 2 Diabetes and the Aging Pancreatic Beta Cell An increased incidence of diabetes is observed with age, and there are many possibly reasons for this. One of these is that the beta cell has reduced proliferative capacity and in diabetic individuals this is further confounded by higher rates of beta cell apoptosis . The currently known underlying mechanisms behind the reduction in beta cell proliferation observed with age include reduced expression of cell cycle activators, increased expression of cell cycle inhibitors, reduced pdx1 expression , and increased amylin aggregation. Studying aging in the non-diabetic rodent and human models is currently Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Function, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolism In Aging

Pancreatic Function, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolism In Aging

Copyright © 2012 Zhenwei Gong and Radhika H. Muzumdar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Aging is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Of the reported 25.8 million Americans estimated to have diabetes, 26.9% are over the age of 65. In certain ethnic groups, the proportion is even higher; almost 1 in 3 older Hispanics and African Americans and 3 out of 4 Pima Indian elders have diabetes. As per the NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination) survey, the percentage of physician-diagnosed diabetes increased from 3.9% in middle-aged adults (40–49 years) to 13.2% in elderly adults (≥75 years). The higher incidence of diabetes is especially alarming considering that diabetes in itself increases the risk for multiple other age-related diseases such as cancer, stroke, cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this review, we summarize the current evidence on how aging affects pancreatic β cell function, β cell mass, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. We also review the effects of aging on the relationship between insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to impaired glucose homeostasis and T2D in the elderly will lead to development of novel treatments that will prevent or delay diabetes, substantially improve quality of life and ultimately increase overall life span. 1. Introduction Aging is an important risk factor for metabolic disorders, including obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Diabetes and its complications remain major c Continue reading >>

Activation Of Cellular Aging Process Could Increase Insulin Secretion In Diabetes Patients

Activation Of Cellular Aging Process Could Increase Insulin Secretion In Diabetes Patients

Activation of cellular aging process could increase insulin secretion in diabetes patients Activation of cellular aging process could increase insulin secretion in diabetes patients Killifish research sheds new light on age-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes 26 February 2016 A cellular program that causes aging can also increase the production of insulin , which could have implications for understanding and treating diabetes , according to new research. Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem investigated the activity of a gene named p16, which is known to activate a program called senescence in cells. Senescence prevents cells from dividing, and plays an important role in preventing cancer. The activity of the p16 gene occurs in pancreatic beta cells during aging and limits the potential for cells to divide. This loss of function can lead to decreased insulin secretion and blood glucose levels subsequently becoming too high, increasing the risk of diabetes . Before the study, the researchers were unaware as to how the p16 gene affected beta cell function. In studies on mice and humans, the effects of the p16 gene led to some surprising results. In mouse studies, p16-induced cellular senescence was found to improve insulin secretion following glucose stimulation, and beta cells actually started to function more efficiently. In diabetic mouse models, senescence actually led to improved glucose levels . In human experiments, p16 was activated in islets, which also led to increased insulin secretion. This suggests that p16 is the main driver of enhanced insulin secretion following senescence in both humans and mice. Study author Dr. Ittai Ben-Porath explained: "Senescence of cells is generally thought to represent a state in which cells lose their functiona Continue reading >>

Is It Normal Aging Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Is It Normal Aging Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Recognize the symptoms of Type 2 diabetes in older adults. Posted on October 8, 2013 by Linda Cronk, Michigan State University Extension According to the Michigan State University Geriatric Education Center of Michigan, Type 2 diabetes continues to increase in the United States population. For adults over the age of 65, diabetes occurs in approximately 27 percent and pre-diabetes occurs in 50 percent of this population. When caregivers think about the overall goals of care for their loved one, it is important to understand how diabetes affects the quality of life for older adults. The American Geriatrics Society says that older people with diabetes experience higher rates of mental and physical disability and premature death. They are also more prone to develop other illnesses, like high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. In addition, they also have a greater risk for several conditions associated with the aging process, such as depression, reduced mental function, urinary incontinence, harmful falls, persistent pain and over-medication. Is it normal aging or is it because of Type 2 diabetes? In order to figure out how your loved one is affected by Type 2 diabetes, it is important to know how to recognize the difference between normal aging and health problems caused by diabetes. Aging and symptoms of Type 2 diabetes have some similarities they both can bring on poor eyesight, fatigue, high blood pressure, depression, as well as more frequent urination and higher rates of heart disease and stroke. Michigan State University Extension says that symptoms can also look similar, but for different reasons: With aging, there may be gait changes because of arthritis and osteoporosis, but gait changes with diabetes may result from neuropathy. Restlessness and confusion s Continue reading >>

Halle Berry Reveals Diet That Slowed Aging Process And Reversed Diabetes Diagnosis

Halle Berry Reveals Diet That Slowed Aging Process And Reversed Diabetes Diagnosis

I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2017. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasnt right and began to do a lot of research. On August 13th I found Lisas diabetes story (google HOW I FREED MYSELF FROM DIABETES ) I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70s and the 80s. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods I had no idea that I had type II diabetes. I was diagnosed at age 50, after complaining to my doctor about being very tired. There is no family history of this disease. Im a male and at the time of diagnosis, I weighed about 215. (Im 62)Within 6 months, I had gained 30 to 35 pounds, and apparently the diabetes medicines (Actos and Glimiperide) are known to cause weight gain. I wish my doctor had mentioned that, so I could have monitored my weight more closely. I was also taking metformin 1000 mg twice daily December 2017 our family doctor started me on Green House Herbal Clinic Diabetes Disease Herbal mixture, 5 weeks into treatment I improved dramatically. At the end of the full treatment course, the disease is totally under control. No case blurred vision, frequent urination, or weakness Visit Green Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Altered Glucose Metabolism With Aging

Diabetes And Altered Glucose Metabolism With Aging

Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging Rita Rastogi Kalyani, MD, MHS and Josephine M. Egan, MD Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance affect a substantial proportion of older adults. While the aging process can be associated with alterations in glucose metabolism, including both relative insulin resistance and islet cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism is not a necessary component of aging. Instead, older adults with diabetes and altered glucose status likely represent a vulnerable subset of the population at high-risk for complications and adverse geriatric syndromes such as accelerated muscle loss, functional disability, frailty, and early mortality. Goals for treatment of diabetes in the elderly include control of hyperglycemia, prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, avoidance of hypoglycemia and preservation of quality of life. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population with regards to the presence of comorbidities, life expectancy, and functional status, an individualized approach to diabetes management is often appropriate. A growing area of research seeks to explore associations of dysglycemia and insulin resistance with the development of adverse outcomes in the elderly and may ultimately inform guidelines on the use of future glucose-lowering therapies in this population. Keywords: Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drug 'slows Aging Process And Increases Lifespan,' Study Suggests

Diabetic Drug 'slows Aging Process And Increases Lifespan,' Study Suggests

Metformin is a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes. But new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds the medication may also slow the aging process and increase lifespan. Metformin belongs to a class of drugs known as biguanides. For patients with type 2 diabetes, it helps control blood sugar by reducing the amount of glucose absorbed from food and the levels of glucose produced by the liver. It also increases the body's natural response to insulin. But studies have suggested that the health benefits of metformin may reach further than type 2 diabetes. In 2010, Medical News Today reported on two studies that suggested metformin may protect against lung cancer in smokers. A 2012 study also found that the drug may show promise in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. Now, a research team led by Wouter De Haes of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven) in Belgium finds that metformin may be useful for halting the aging process. Testing metformin in roundworms To reach their findings, the team conducted a series of experiments in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans - a model they say is ideal for studying the aging process as it only has a 3-week lifespan. The team found that metformin increased the number of toxic molecules released in the worms' cells, which they were surprised to find boosted their long-term strength and longevity. "As they age, the worms get smaller, wrinkle up and become less mobile. But worms treated with metformin show very limited size loss and no wrinkling. They not only age slower, but they also stay healthier longer," says Haes. But how does metformin work? The team explains that our body's cells get their energy from mitochondria - the "powerhouses" in each cell that trigger small Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Overview Diabetes is a problem that has many consequences: If you have the disease, your body can no longer keep its blood sugar at a healthy level. But over time, the effects of diabetes can become much more complicated. The disease can lead to serious, even life-threatening problems from your head to your toes. Too much blood sugar (also called glucose) can damage the blood vessels and nerves that run throughout your body. This can set the stage for many other medical conditions: stroke heart disease kidney disease vision problems and blindness damage to the feet or legs However, there is good news for the 26 million Americans with diabetes—and those at risk. Experts are learning more all the time about lifestyle steps for diabetes control and prevention. New medications and devices can also help you keep control over your blood sugar and prevent complications, says Johns Hopkins expert Rita Kalyani, M.D. Definitions A1C Test: A blood test used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. By measuring how much glucose (also called blood sugar) is attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in your red blood cells, this test gives you and your health-care provider a picture of your average blood glucose levels over three months. A normal result is below 5.7 percent. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should have this test done twice a year to check if your blood glucose is under control. Blood glucose: Also referred to as blood sugar, the primary energy source for the cells in your body. Blood glucose levels rise after meals and fall the longer you’ve gone without eating. Your blood glucose level is a measure of how much glucose you have in your bloodstream. A normal fasting blood glucose level is between 70 and 100 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter of blood). Insulin (in-suh-lin): A Continue reading >>

Guard Proteins Against Accelerated Aging - Page 1 | Life Extension

Guard Proteins Against Accelerated Aging - Page 1 | Life Extension

Memory loss or other cognitive impairment. Skin conditions, such as rashes, infections, thin skin, and discoloration. Loss of elasticity and flexibility of skin and other tissues. Given that diabetes and aging share so many characteristics, its not surprising that they also respond to many of the same prevention and treatment strategies. Glycation and Glycotoxins: AGEs Age You Faster When patients hear that glycation is one of the major consequences of diabetes and a contributing factor in diabetic complications, their typical response is, Ive never heard of it. Is it something new? When they hear that scientists have known about glycation since at least 1912 and of its major impact on diabetes and diabetic complications since the 1980s, their typical response is, Why havent I heard about it? Why isnt my doctor talking about it? Glycation is a biochemical process that involves a series of non-enzymatic reactions (those that dont require enzymes to make them happen) between proteins and/or certain lipids (fats) and glucose. The result is the formation of toxic substances known as AGEsadvanced glycation end productsand ALEsadvanced lipoxidation end products. If youve ever made toast, then youve experienced glycation firsthand. Toasting bread involves the Maillard reactionthe browning reaction that occurs when food is heated and cooked at high temperatures. This reaction is also commonly observed when we grill lamb chops, broil salmon steaks, and make French fries. Levels of AGEs and ALEs increase as people grow older, and those levels are fueled by the foods we eat. In the past, scientists underestimated the impact of food-derived glycotoxins damage on human cells, organs, and tissues. Recent groundbreaking research, however, has uncovered startling evidence of the criti Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging?

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging? UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Question:How does diabetes affect the speed of aging? Answer:When I first began doing research in the diabetes-related arena, diabetes was considered to be a premature aging process. In other words, for someone 35 years of age with diabetes versus someone with 35 without diabetes, it may have been felt that patient with diabetes may actually have been 45 in terms of their actual physical age. But we now know with more aggressive management of diabetes and risk factors that relate to the complications of diabetes, we no longer consider diabetes as premature aging. Of course, note the condition; the condition is more aggressive management of diabetes and related conditions to prevent the premature aging process. I think the good news now is that patients with diabetes, whether type 1 from an early age on or type 2 developed during adulthood, can live as nearly as long, if not as long, as patients without diabetes. Continue reading >>

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