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Diabetes And Aging

Healthy Aging With Diabetes

Healthy Aging With Diabetes

“I can tell you one thing — growing old ain’t for wimps!” —gray-haired gentleman at Sterling Center YMCA in Beverly, Massachusetts It used to be said that having diabetes aged people an additional 20 years. Today, thanks to better tools for managing diabetes and preventing and treating its complications, people with diabetes have the opportunity to live longer than ever before. However, managing diabetes in the golden years presents a variety of challenges, ranging from increased insulin resistance to being on multiple drugs. Here is what you should know about the effects of diabetes on aging and vice versa, and what you can do to stay healthy and full of vitality well into old age. What happens during aging As you age, you may be most aware of your new gray hairs and wrinkles, but aging causes changes throughout the entire body. A person’s basal metabolic rate — the amount of energy the body expends at rest — declines with age. By some estimates, a person’s basal metabolism drops by 2% per decade starting at age 20. Some researchers believe that this decline is due almost solely to the loss of muscle mass that comes with age. The body’s ability to process oxygen — its aerobic capacity — also declines with age. By some estimates, a person’s aerobic capacity by age 65 is typically only 60% to 70% of what it was when he was younger (although the decline appears to be less in older people who exercise regularly). This decline may be due to several factors, including poor lung function, heart function, and blood circulation. With advancing years, the body gradually becomes less adept at taking up and using glucose from the bloodstream — a condition known as glucose intolerance, which sets the stage for Type 2 diabetes. One contributing factor to Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

Research published this month in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows a significant spike in the rates of diabetes in the U.S. over the past two decades. In particular, the prevalence of prediabetes has risen from 5.8 percent between 1988 and 1994 to 12.4 percent between 2005 and 2010. Dr. Kathleen Figaro, an endocrinologist with Genesis Health System in Bettendorf, Iowa, told Healthline that a shrinking “cost per calorie” ratio in our food is partly to blame for the increase. “There is an excess amount of corn being produced, and it has to go somewhere. It is being used to make high-fructose corn syrup that is added to foods and decreases the price per calorie,” she said. As a result, we get dense, highly processed foods that are readily available, said Figaro. They can be bought cheaply in inner cities or other so-called “food deserts,” where access to quality, fresh foods is limited. Learn About the Type 2 Diabetes Diet » Get Tested by Age 45, Says ADA Tami Ross, a certified diabetes instructor in Lexington, Ky., who served as the president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators, told Healthline that age 40 is the “magic number,” when diabetes begins to sneak up on people. She said that everyone 40 and older should take the interactive type 2 diabetes screening test provided by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Find Out How to Face Diabetes Head On » Diabetes occurs when the body does not process sugar properly. Nonwhites, people who are overweight, and those with a family history of diabetes are at a higher risk. Almost 26 million people in the U.S., or 8.3 percent of the population, have diabetes, according to the ADA. Type 2 diabetes tends to affect people as they get older. About seven million people in the U.S. have type 2 di Continue reading >>

6 Challenges Of Aging With Diabetes

6 Challenges Of Aging With Diabetes

How to overcome your bodys natural changes About one in four Americans over the age of 60 have diabetes. Managing the disease can become more difficult as people enter their 60s, 70s, and 80s. Here's what experts have to say about the challenges of aging and what you can do to overcome them: Two of the most important things aging people can do is admit that they need help and ask for it, says Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, professor of gerontology and Sonya Ziporkin Gershowitz chair of gerontology at the University of Maryland School of Nursing. "A lot of people don't want to admit they are not checking their glucose levels," she says. "If you cannot adhere to your self-care regimen, be honest. Talk to your provider about it so you can work out a system that's realistic for you." It's also important to let health care providers know about any changes your body is going through, no matter how small, says Andrew Goldberg, MD, who heads the Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Healthfunded Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. "For example, tell your doctor if you are feeling weak or fatigued or light-headed." Even the smallest change may be important to note for the health of a person with diabetes. "Pay attention to your body. When it doesn't seem right, ask about it," he says. Read on for six common challenges of aging to discuss with your health care provider: More than 28 percent of adults over the age of 40 living with diabetes experience diabetic retinopathy , or damage to the small blood vessels in the retina that can result in loss of vision. As people age, vision can deteriorate even further, especially if blood glucose levels are uncontrolled. Cataracts, commo Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older People - A Disease You Can Manage

Diabetes In Older People - A Disease You Can Manage

Diabetes is a serious disease. It happens when your blood levels of glucose, a form of sugar, are too high. Diabetes can lead to dangerous health problems. The good news is that high glucose levels can be managed to help control the disease and prevent or delay future problems. What is Diabetes? Our bodies change the foods we eat into glucose. Glucose travels through the bloodstream to "fuel" or feed our cells. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use glucose for energy. People with diabetes either do not make insulin, do not use insulin properly, or both. This means they have too much glucose (sugar) in their blood. As a result, they often feel tired, hungry, or thirsty; they may lose weight, urinate often, or have trouble with their eyes. In time, the high levels of this form of sugar in the blood (glucose) can hurt their eyes, kidneys, and nerves. It can also cause heart disease, strokes and even the need to remove all or part of a limb (amputation). Diabetes tends to run in families, but other factors add to the risk of getting diabetes. For example, being overweight and underactive can sometimes trigger diabetes in people who are at risk. There is a lot of research underway looking at what causes diabetes and how best to manage it. But there is a lot we do know. For example, we know that careful control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol can help prevent or delay diabetes and its complications. For more, please read the Diabetes article. Types of Diabetes There are two types of diabetes. In one kind, people must take insulin every day. This is called type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile-onset diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is often first seen in children, teenagers, or adults under age 30. The second kind of diabetes happens when the body pro Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Diabetes: What You Need To Know As You Age

Overview Diabetes is a problem that has many consequences: If you have the disease, your body can no longer keep its blood sugar at a healthy level. But over time, the effects of diabetes can become much more complicated. The disease can lead to serious, even life-threatening problems from your head to your toes. Too much blood sugar (also called glucose) can damage the blood vessels and nerves that run throughout your body. This can set the stage for many other medical conditions: stroke heart disease kidney disease vision problems and blindness damage to the feet or legs However, there is good news for the 26 million Americans with diabetes—and those at risk. Experts are learning more all the time about lifestyle steps for diabetes control and prevention. New medications and devices can also help you keep control over your blood sugar and prevent complications, says Johns Hopkins expert Rita Kalyani, M.D. Definitions A1C Test: A blood test used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. By measuring how much glucose (also called blood sugar) is attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in your red blood cells, this test gives you and your health-care provider a picture of your average blood glucose levels over three months. A normal result is below 5.7 percent. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should have this test done twice a year to check if your blood glucose is under control. Blood glucose: Also referred to as blood sugar, the primary energy source for the cells in your body. Blood glucose levels rise after meals and fall the longer you’ve gone without eating. Your blood glucose level is a measure of how much glucose you have in your bloodstream. A normal fasting blood glucose level is between 70 and 100 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter of blood). Insulin (in-suh-lin): A Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Aging: How To Avoid Health Problems

Diabetes And Aging: How To Avoid Health Problems

Cant see objects to the sides as well as you used to This happens when you have an infection in your gums and other tissues nearby. Without proper dental care, your risk for gum disease may rise as you age. Diabetes makes you more likely to get gum disease. It affects your ability to fight off infections, including those in your mouth. Untreated gum disease can lead to tooth loss. Fortunately, theres plenty you can do to prevent problems. Brush twice a day. Floss once a day. And rinse with an antiseptic mouthwash daily. Keeping good sugar control plus visiting your dentist every 6 months helps reduce your risk of dental problems. Contact him if you notice any signs of disease, like gums that become red, swollen, or bleed easily. Theyre a serious concern among older adults. Low vision, certain medicines, balance problems, and more can cause you to take a tumble. Diabetes also puts you at risk for falls. It can damage nerves in your feet, a condition called peripheral neuropathy. It can cause pain, tingling, sensitivity, pins and needles, or numbness in your feet. This can make it hard to sense where your feet are, which can cause you to easily trip or fall. Regular doctor visits can keep you standing tall. Hell check your feet every time. If you notice any signs of peripheral neuropathy or any issues with your feet, be sure to let him know right away. Be on the lookout for problems in the bedroom. When you have diabetes, they may start earlier or become more severe than with other folks. The disease can damage nerves or blood vessels that affect your sexual organs. Erectile dysfunction -- trouble getting or keeping an erection Retrograde ejaculation -- semen goes into the bladder instead of out your penis Deceased vaginal lubrication, or vaginal dryness If you have chan Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging?

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. How Does Diabetes Affect The Speed Of Aging? UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Question:How does diabetes affect the speed of aging? Answer:When I first began doing research in the diabetes-related arena, diabetes was considered to be a premature aging process. In other words, for someone 35 years of age with diabetes versus someone with 35 without diabetes, it may have been felt that patient with diabetes may actually have been 45 in terms of their actual physical age. But we now know with more aggressive management of diabetes and risk factors that relate to the complications of diabetes, we no longer consider diabetes as premature aging. Of course, note the condition; the condition is more aggressive management of diabetes and related conditions to prevent the premature aging process. I think the good news now is that patients with diabetes, whether type 1 from an early age on or type 2 developed during adulthood, can live as nearly as long, if not as long, as patients without diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Aging-related Complications

Diabetes And Aging-related Complications

Details why and how the aging process is accelerated under diabetes Provides valuable insights for the management of various types of diabetes-related and aging-related disorders Each chapter focuses on a specific diabetes-related complication ebooks can be used on all reading devices Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days. This book addresses why and how the aging process is accelerated under diabetes, providing valuable and comprehensive information for the management of various types of diabetes- and aging-related disorders. Since several papers have shown that average life span and healthy life expectancy are reduced in diabetic patients, especially in those with a long history of disease, the early detection and treatment of diabetes-related complications are urgently needed in order to slow the aging process and help people successfully live with diabetes. Each chapter of this book addresses a specific diabetes and aging-related complication. The topics covered include not only diabetic vascular complications, the leading causes of morbidities and high mortality rates in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, but also other aging-related complications such as Alzheimers disease, osteoporosis, periodontitis and cancer growth and metastasis. Experts on each topic discuss the background of the aging process and methods for coping with diabetes-related complications. The book as a whole, as well as the individual chapters, offer a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners in the fields of diabetic studies, gerontology, and aging science. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older People

Diabetes In Older People

On this page: Diabetes is a serious disease. People get diabetes when their blood glucose level, sometimes called blood sugar, is too high. The good news is that there are things you can do to take control of diabetes and prevent its problems. And, if you are worried about getting diabetes, there are things you can do to lower your risk. What Is Diabetes? Our bodies turn the food we eat into glucose. Insulin helps glucose get into our cells, where it can be used to make energy. If you have diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin, may not use insulin in the right way, or both. That can cause too much glucose in the blood. Your family doctor may refer you to a doctor who specializes in taking care of people with diabetes, called an endocrinologist. Types of Diabetes There are two main kinds of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. Although adults can develop this type of diabetes, it occurs most often in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin but doesn’t use it the right way. It is the most common kind of diabetes. It occurs most often in middle-aged and older adults, but it can also affect children. Your chance of getting type 2 diabetes is higher if you are overweight, inactive, or have a family history of diabetes. Diabetes can affect many parts of your body. It’s important to keep diabetes under control. Over time, it can cause serious health problems like heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and circulation problems that may lead to amputation. People with type 2 diabetes also have a greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease. What Is Prediabetes? Many people have “prediabetes.” This means their glucose levels are higher than normal but Continue reading >>

Aging & Health A To Z

Aging & Health A To Z

Diabetes Basic Facts & Information What is Diabetes? Diabetes develops when the amount of sugar in your blood becomes too high, either because your body doesn’t make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes), or because your body doesn’t respond to insulin (type 2 diabetes). When your body digests food, it converts much of it into glucose, a sugar that your body’s cells need for energy. The hormone insulin helps your body use glucose, and also helps maintain healthy blood levels of glucose. When your body produces too little insulin, or can’t respond to it, glucose tends to remain in your bloodstream, instead of going into your cells. The Most Common Types of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, your body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. That’s why people with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections or use an insulin pump to control their blood sugar. Though Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults, it can occur at any age. Only 5 to 10 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. You can’t prevent this form of diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes In type 2 diabetes, your pancreas can’t produce enough insulin for your needs, or your cells can’t use insulin properly (insulin resistance). Older adults are especially prone to type 2 diabetes, because aging makes the body less accepting of sugars. What’s more, being overweight makes your chances of developing type 2 diabetes extremely high. Most people can prevent or control type 2 diabetes by eating a healthy diet and by being physically active. What are Pre-diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome? In pre-diabetes, your glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be called diabetes. Pre-diabetes increases your risk for developing type 2 diabetes and other prob Continue reading >>

Glu : The New Complication: Aging With Type 1 Diabetes

Glu : The New Complication: Aging With Type 1 Diabetes

Update: You can now listen to our Diabetespeaks podcast episode of this event by clicking here: With incredible breakthroughs in diabetes technology, therapy and clinical care, people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are living longer than ever. But as people age, they take on a whole separate host of challenges that are compounded by T1D. Many fear they will not have the self-reliance, care, support, or financial resources necessary to manage their blood sugar and continue to live well with diabetes in their golden years. Last month, this concerning issue was presented at T1D Exchanges Annual Meeting. Four individuals currently or soon facing this dilemma spoke on a patient panel, bringing to light a new complication of type 1 diabetes rarely discussed in a public forum. This is a new problem, based on our recent success in treating T1D, said Dr. Nick Argento , an endocrinologist and person with diabetes (PWD). The Joslin 50-year survivors used to be sort of an elite group. Thats not true anymore. Now, its expected, not the exception. Joining Argento on stage was Paul Madden, Bunny Kasper, and Sandy Brooks, each with a different diabetes experience, but all in their later stages of life. Bunny Kasper , who is in her mid-seventies and has lived with diabetes most of her adult life, volunteers as a support group leader for families with children who have T1D. She shared that this group of parents recently commented that she should find diabetes management easier because shes been doing it for so long. But what they didnt understand was how much more tired she is at this age, and that its actually harder, not easier, after all these years. Theres just very little understanding about the elder generation and what we deal with, said Kasper. In addition to physical wear and tear, Continue reading >>

Aging And Cognitive Decline In Diabetes

Aging And Cognitive Decline In Diabetes

Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > July 2014 Published on: July 21, 2014 The association between diabetes and cognition has been known for a while. However, until recently, the primary focus of diabetes-related complications has been on hypertension, renal failure, vision loss, autonomic and peripheral neuropathy, myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular disease, including stroke. Neuropathy, in particular, is responsible for additional comorbidities, resulting in a significantly increased cost of treatment.1 Of late, the effect of hyperglycemia on the cognitive ability of patients has been regaining interest, after research efforts were abandoned in the United States by 1970.2 According to the World Health Organization, dementiaa cognitive degeneration syndromeaffects 35.6 million people globally, with about 7.7 million added every year. Almost 60% to 70% of dementia cases are a result of pathological degeneration caused by Alzheimers,3 and recent data suggest that diabetes could be one of the causative factors for the remaining 30% of cases. In the United States, 16 million people were estimated to be living with cognitive impairment in 2010. With the baby boomers fast approaching and crossing 65 years of age, that number is expected to increase significantly.4 The cost of patient care can be an enormous strain on the healthcare system, both in direct healthcare costs and indirect costs, such as the loss of income for a caregiver within the family. Treating patients with Alzheimers and other related dementias were estimated to cost Medicaid nursing facilities an average of $647 million in 2010, which did not include prescription drug costs or home- and community-based care.4 The direct costs of Alzheimers alone are estimated at $214 billion in 2014, $150 billion o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Aging: 6 Common Challenges And How To Overcome Them

Diabetes And Aging: 6 Common Challenges And How To Overcome Them

Change is a natural part of life. And if you have type 2 diabetes , the way you manage the condition should evolve as you age. The risk for diabetes complications , such as heart disease, rises as you get older, while conditions that can affect everyone as they age, such as vision or hearing problems , may have a bigger impact due to diabetes. If you think about the life spectrum, the goals of care are very different, says Medha Munshi, MD , an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Joslin Geriatric Diabetes Program in Boston, where she works with patients in their seventies, eighties, and beyond. This is especially true with managing diabetes , but being aware of the challenges of diabetes and aging will help you to better deal with them. Here are six common age-related challenges that diabetes presents, along with tips to overcome them: Challenge: Hypoglycemia risk. Very low blood sugar levels, or hypoglycemia , can be more dangerous and cause worse outcomes for older people than high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, Dr. Munshi says. Additionally, the hospitalization rate among Medicare patients is higher for hypoglycemia than hyperglycemia, according to a study published in 2014 in JAMA Internal Medicine . Solution: Simplify treatment. According to a study Munshi published in July 2016 in JAMA Internal Medicine , simplifying treatment can help. When study participants who were older than 70 and taking multiple insulin injections moved to a regimen of once-a-day insulin along with non-insulin agents, the risk of hypoglycemia decreased. Challenge: Increased risk of diabetes complications. The risk of health complications related to type 2 diabetes increases as you get older. For instance, heart disease and stroke were the most comm Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Function, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolism In Aging

Pancreatic Function, Type 2 Diabetes, And Metabolism In Aging

Copyright © 2012 Zhenwei Gong and Radhika H. Muzumdar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Aging is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Of the reported 25.8 million Americans estimated to have diabetes, 26.9% are over the age of 65. In certain ethnic groups, the proportion is even higher; almost 1 in 3 older Hispanics and African Americans and 3 out of 4 Pima Indian elders have diabetes. As per the NHANES III (Third National Health and Nutrition Examination) survey, the percentage of physician-diagnosed diabetes increased from 3.9% in middle-aged adults (40–49 years) to 13.2% in elderly adults (≥75 years). The higher incidence of diabetes is especially alarming considering that diabetes in itself increases the risk for multiple other age-related diseases such as cancer, stroke, cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this review, we summarize the current evidence on how aging affects pancreatic β cell function, β cell mass, insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. We also review the effects of aging on the relationship between insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to impaired glucose homeostasis and T2D in the elderly will lead to development of novel treatments that will prevent or delay diabetes, substantially improve quality of life and ultimately increase overall life span. 1. Introduction Aging is an important risk factor for metabolic disorders, including obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Diabetes and its complications remain major c Continue reading >>

Experimental Diabetes And Aging Program - The Mount Sinai Hospital | Mount Sinai - New York

Experimental Diabetes And Aging Program - The Mount Sinai Hospital | Mount Sinai - New York

Helen Vlassara, M.D., formerly Professor and head of the Laboratory of Diabetes and Aging at the Picower Institute for Medical Research, joined Mount Sinai in 1998 as Professor in Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development and Director of the Experimental Diabetes and Aging Program. She is also a Professor of Medicine, Molecular Medicine, and Gene Therapy. Dr. Vlassara has conducted extensive, innovative research in areas as diverse as atherosclerosis, kidney disease, and disorders of the central nervous system such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Her work has helped define one of the major mechanisms that induce aging and diabetes-related illnesses: the process of spontaneous modification of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids by glucoses, known as glycation. She has also conducted seminal studies demonstrating the protective effects of agents that inhibit this process. Dr. Vlassara will be expanding her investigations in basic and clinical research. Goals of the basic research program will be to broaden the working model on pathogenic processes and obtain tools for prevention/intervention treatments of the complications of aging and diabetes. These complex entities reflect multiple interactions of environmental and genetic parameters. Her studies have defined: a) the chemical and cellular-toxicity of advanced glycation; b) a new receptor system that recognizes AGE-modified molecules (AGE-receptor); c) genetic factor(s) influencing the AGE-receptor function. Cellular activation via this receptor contributes to vascular, renal, and neuronal dysfunction under conditions of AGE-overaccumulation, as in aging, diabetes, or renal impairment. These factors, combined with environmental AGEs, eg., diet and tobacco smoke, can contribute to tissue injury, leading Continue reading >>

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