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Diabetes And Aggressive Behavior

Effect Of Hypos On Relationships

Effect Of Hypos On Relationships

Tweet Hypos can be trying on relationships. The way people with diabetes react to hypos can vary from person to person and the reaction can also vary from time to time. Letting people know how you tend to react is often a good idea so people will know what to watch for and will be able to better understand what is happening should you go hypo. Depending on the severity of the hypo, it can be difficult to maintain full composure, but if you can, try to recognise the concerns of those around you. Friction over whether you are hypoglycemic It can be frustrating if each time you feel stressed or upset your partner or a family member assumes it’s because you are low on blood sugar. Sometimes they may be right whereas other times your blood sugar may be fine. If you’re asked to do a blood test when you feel you’re fine you may think “Not again! It’s my diabetes, I’ll say how I control it.” It may be your diabetes but diabetes can be a great strain on your friends, family and your partner. The closer they are to you, the more they’ll share your difficulties. If they ask you to do a blood test, see it as an opportunity to repay their support and agree to do a test. If it is low, you’ll be glad you tested, if it’s normal then you know you’re ok and your partner or family member will usually feel more settled knowing you’re not low. Fear of hypoglycemia There are a lot of situations where fear of hypoglycemia exists. It can be fear within yourself of the consequences of a hypo or it may be the fear felt by your family, friends, your partner or colleagues. One key to help is to prevent the hypos taking place. This may not be an easy task, but with commitment and conviction it is possible. Read more about fear of hypoglycemia Bizarre or violent reactions to Continue reading >>

Sugar On The Brain

Sugar On The Brain

I know that I shouldn’t feed my two daughters, who are eight and twelve, dinner at 7:30. It’s too late. But my wife and I are overscheduled and sometimes it just happens. And so, a few weeks ago, faced with yet another late meal, my younger daughter fell into one of those anger vortices. Annoyed at a perceived inequity in chore distribution, she slammed my glass of soda onto the counter, somewhat inadvertently splattering the liquid onto the floor and me. She told me, “You’re not being nice! You’re being a stupid old parent who knows nothing!” Maybe so: when these evening outbursts occur, I feel responsible. After all, as a parent I’m supposed to provide them with timely calories. Shortly after this particular blowup, I came across a study in which men and women stuck pins—sometimes many pins—into voodoo dolls as a measure of their resentment and annoyance with their spouses. The researchers found that the subjects were more likely to stick in lots of pins when their glucose level was low. I was intrigued—the findings seemed to illuminate my experience with my kids (and people in general), and offered a clear solution: eat regularly, enhance self-control. My response was common, I think, because the study got a lot of attention—stories on the “Today” show, ABC News, NPR, and lots of newspapers around the world. Part of the study’s appeal is its obviousness: anyone with kids, or a partner or friends or any level of self-awareness, probably knows on some level that hunger begets irritability. It’s somehow comforting when science confirms what we already know, as if the researchers are just now catching up to our common sense. “Self-control is a limited resource,” says the Ohio State psychologist Brad Bushman, who led the study. “With le Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Signs Treatment Asymptomatic Hypo Be Prepared (how to carry a sugar supply) Exercise and hypo. Nigel Goes Hypo Hypo Humor References The most serious side effect of too much insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening, even fatal condition. Classic signs of hypoglycemia lethargy (lack of energy) weakness head tilting "drunkedness" - wobbling when walking, unbalanced hunger restlessness shivering ataxia - usually lack of muscular coordination, but maybe changes in head and neck movements disorientation stupor convulsions or seizures coma The occurrence of signs depends on how far the bg drops and on how fast the blood glucose drops. Owners of diabetic cats have also reported observing these signs sleepiness unable to wake the cat easily when it is sleeping. vomiting glassy eyes - it may look like it is staring into space laying, sleeping, or curled up in an unusual location of the house meowing, crying, yowling, or vocalizing in a way that is unusual for your cat some cats get aggressive drooling coughing Owners of diabetic dogs have also reported observing these signs sweating - check the nose and the paw pads. lip smacking or licking getting physically "stuck" in a place where the pet normally could get itself out (for example, behind a partially closed door that a pet would usually nudge open.) Some animals are asymptomatic at very low bg values. This means they do not show any of the usual signs of hypoglycemia even though their bg is very low. Read experiences of three pets who have had episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Be Prepared Always have corn syrup or sugar available. Corn syrup works well because it is a very pure sugar, and it is liquid. In the U.S. "Karo" is a brand name of corn syrup and you'll often see this Continue reading >>

The ‘other’ Possible Consequence Of Unrecognized Severe Hypoglycemia

The ‘other’ Possible Consequence Of Unrecognized Severe Hypoglycemia

As diabetes educators, educating people with diabetes — especially those with type 1 diabetes — about how to recognize and treat hypoglycemia is a key educational consideration. Because everyone does not exhibit or experience hypoglycemia in the same way, we often spend time discussing how to recognize one’s own body’s response to impending hypoglycemia and provide guidance in how to treat the symptoms promptly. The goal of the educational session is to prevent the hypoglycemia from becoming a serious event and, above all, to keep the person safe. Diabetes educators are aware that aggressive refusal of help with severe hypoglycemia is common. Families and support teams are taught that some of the symptoms of severe hypoglycemia may include unpredictable and combative behavior. Anyone who has experience with a loved one with severe hypoglycemia is well aware that there is no way to rationalize, or “talk sense,” with him or her. Because treatment of severe hypoglycemia may require the assistance of another person, glucagon administration is also taught to a family member or support person. Additionally, diabetes educators recommend that some sort of medical alert identification be worn or carried by the person with diabetes in the event of an emergency. But, is this enough education and information about severe hypoglycemic symptoms and treatment to keep the person with diabetes safe? As diabetes educators, do we need to do more? Lack of hypoglycemia awareness A recent court case illustrates how diabetes educators must consider additional educational strategies regarding awareness and treatment of severe hypoglycemia. In March 2009, a 17-year-old with type 1 diabetes from the south side of Chicago was charged with two counts of aggravated assault as a result o Continue reading >>

Psycho-behavioral Changes In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Psycho-behavioral Changes In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common type of diabetes in children. This study aimed to investigate psycho-behavioral changes in Chinese children with T1DM and to provide some advices for nurses, parents and other persons. Methods Forty-five patients with T1DM (26 boys and 19 girls with a mean age of 10.40±3.01 years) were enrolled. According to the glycosylated hemoglobin levels recommended by the American Diabetes Association, the patients were subdivided into a well-controlled group and a poorly-controlled group. Fifty-three healthy children served as a control group. Psycho-behavioral changes were investigated by using Achenbach’s Child Behavior Check List. Compared with the control group, the patients with T1DM had significantly higher mean scores for withdrawal, anxiety/depression, attention problems, delinquent behavior, aggressive behavior, externalizing problems, and internalizing problems (P<0.017). Moreover, the mean scores for somatic complaints in the poorly-controlled subgroup were significantly higher than those in the well-controlled subgroup (t=3.582, P=0.001). Compared with the control group, the well-controlled subgroup had higher scores for withdrawal, anxiety/depression, and internalizing problems (P<0.017). But the poorly-controlled subgroup had higher scores for withdrawal, somatic complaint, anxiety/depression, delinquent behavior, aggressive behavior, externalizing and internalizing problems (P<0.017). Children with T1DM may have some psycho-behavioral problems. Timely nursing interventions must be conducted to solve these problems. Preview Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Continue reading >>

Researchers Find Link Between Sugar, Diabetes And Aggression

Researchers Find Link Between Sugar, Diabetes And Aggression

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A spoonful of sugar may be enough to cool a hot temper, at least for a short time, according to new research. A study found that people who drank a glass of lemonade sweetened with sugar acted less aggressively toward a stranger a few minutes later than did people who consumed lemonade with a sugar substitute. Researchers believe it all has to do with the glucose, a simple sugar found in the bloodstream that provides energy for the brain. Brad Bushman “Avoiding aggressive impulses takes self control, and self control takes a lot of energy. Glucose provides that energy in the brain,” said Brad Bushman, co-author of the study and professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University. “Drinking sweetened lemonade helped provide the short-term energy needed to avoid lashing out at others.” The finding is more than just a medical curiosity, Bushman said. In two published papers, he and his colleagues did several studies showing that people who have trouble metabolizing, or using, glucose in their bodies show more evidence of aggression and less willingness to forgive others. The problem is that the number of people who have trouble metabolizing glucose -- mainly those with diabetes -- is rising rapidly. From 1980 through 2008, the number of Americans with diabetes has more than tripled (from 5.6 million to 18.1 million). “Diabetes may not only harm yourself -- it is bad for society,” Bushman said. “The healthy metabolism of glucose may contribute to a more peaceful society by providing people with a higher level of energy for self-control.” Bushman conducted the lemonade study with C. Nathan DeWall and Timothy Deckman of the University of Kentucky and Matthew Gailllot of SUNY-Albany. It appears online in the journal Aggressive B Continue reading >>

Sweetened Blood Cools Hot Tempers: Physiological Self-control And Aggression

Sweetened Blood Cools Hot Tempers: Physiological Self-control And Aggression

“Educate your children to self-control, to the habit of holding passion and prejudice and evil tendencies subject to an upright and reasoning will, and you have done much to abolish misery from their future and crimes from society.” There are many causes of aggression and violence, including provocation, frustration, alcohol intoxication, violence in the media, weapons, hot temperatures, loud noises, pollution, crowding, and many other unpleasant events [for a review see Bushman and Huesmann, 2010]. This raises an important question: Why is there not more aggression and violence than there is? After all, who has not experienced provocation, frustration, anger, insult, alcohol, media violence, or hot weather in the past year? Yet most people do not hurt or kill anyone. These factors may give rise to violent impulses, but people mostly restrain themselves. Self-control refers to the ability to override urges, thoughts, and habitual tendencies in order to behave in accordance with personal or societal standards for appropriate behavior. Previous research has shown that poor self-control is perhaps the best predictor of criminal behavior [Gottfredson and Hirschi, 1990]. Unfortunately, self-control is a limited resource. When self-control energy is used it becomes depleted, an effect that has been dubbed ego depletion because the self’s energy resources have been reduced [Baumeister et al., 1998]. Numerous studies have shown that when people engage in one act of self-control, they have less self-control for subsequent tasks [Finkel et al., 2006; Richeson and Trawalter, 2005; Schmeichel, 2007]. Of particular relevance to the current investigation is research showing that when people engage in an initial act of self-control they are less able to subsequently control thei Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Adolescents And Diabetes Mellitus

Adolescents And Diabetes Mellitus

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder, a problem with how the body uses food. It is characterized by a failure to secrete enough insulin, or, the inability to use insulin. Because insulin is needed by the body to convert glucose into energy, these failures result excessively high levels of glucose in the blood and not enough energy. Diabetes may be a result of other conditions, such as genetic syndromes, chemicals, drugs, malnutrition, infections, viruses, or other illnesses. The 3 main types of diabetes -- type 1, type 2, and gestational (during pregnancy only) -- are all defined as metabolic disorders that affect the way the body metabolizes, or uses, digested food to make glucose. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. What is prediabetes? In prediabetes, blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be defined as diabetes. However, many people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. Prediabetes also increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. With modest weight loss and moderate physical activity, people with prediabetes can delay or prevent development of type 2 diabetes. Teens and diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association and the National Diabetes Education Program, about 215,000 people younger than 20 have diabetes. Most of them have type 1 diabetes. However, type 2 diabetes, a disease that used to be seen primarily in adults ages 45 and older, has become more common in younger people. This is mainly due to increasing rates of obesity in children and teens. Although the teenage years can be a challenge for any child as he or she goes through sexual and emotional changes, it can be especially trying for adolescents with diabetes. Adolescents inherently want Continue reading >>

44 The Relationship Of Digit Ratios (2d:4d) To Aggressive Behavior In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Low Back Pain.

44 The Relationship Of Digit Ratios (2d:4d) To Aggressive Behavior In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Low Back Pain.

The ratio of the second digit to the fourth digit (2D:4D ratio) has been noted in previous studies to be a sexually dimorphic trait. Women tend to have 2D:4D ratios closer to a value of one, whereas men tend to have 2D:4D ratios of less than one. We postulated that females with lower 2D:4D ratios would have higher levels of aggression. To test this hypothesis we examined patients, staff, or visitors at four hospitals and clinics in Southern California. Aggression was measured by a questionnaire based on the Leifer-Roberts Response Hierarchy, which included 18 questions based on three potential scenarios involving the subject. Second and fourth digits on each hand were measured in triplicate with calipers and the ratio of the second to the fourth digit on each hand was analyzed separately. Our study included 187 females and 95 males all between the ages of 18 and 60 in three treatment groups: diabetes, low back pain, or no health problems. Males scored significantly higher on the test instrument than females, thus validating this instrument for distinguishing sex differences in aggression. On the left-hand ratio, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that aggression was directly related to the 2D:4D ratio when all subjects were combined (r = .18; p = .004) and when females were examined separately (r = .20; p = .008), but the relationship was not statistically significant in males or in any treatment group alone. Moreover, on the right hand, a positive relationship between 2D:4D ratio and aggression was found in male and female diabetics (r = .37; p = .0095) but not in low back pain or control subjects or all groups combined. Our finding suggests that common factors appear to control digit growth and aggression predisposition and that these factors are expressed more stro Continue reading >>

Do Carbs Make You Crazy?

Do Carbs Make You Crazy?

Perhaps I should be more circumspect with my title. After all, there are several popular ideas out there: one that carbohydrates cause blood sugar spikes and crashes, leading to mood swings and general crankiness. The second is that sugar (that special fructose-filled form of carbohydrate) causes everything from ADHD to delinquency to psychosis to bipolar disorder. I think pretty much everyone has heard of these ideas. Most recently I saw them in an article, "How I Overcame Bipolar II (and Saved My Own Life)" by Michael Ellsberg. Here is a quote from the article, when he saw an orthomolecular physician specializing in diet and health: Dr. Hoffman told me there is mounting clinical evidence linking mood swings to blood sugar issues, and that in his experience bipolar patients respond well to cutting out refined sugar, and coffee and alcohol (which affect blood sugar) from their diets. "You should stop eating refined sugar altogether, and stop drinking alcohol and coffee," he told me. Apparently, Mr. Ellsberg went to a psychiatrist also: I asked the psychiatrist I was seeing at the time whether he thought there was any link between nutrition and mental health. He looked at me as though I had just asked whether there was any link between mental health and UFO rectal probes. "There is absolutely no evidence of any link whatsoever between dietary choices and mental health," he said curtly, and changed the subject. Given a couple of years of intense research into the subject, I would (perhaps not so) respectfully disagree. Dietary choices can make a large impact on mental health. But what about the more specific question of whether we eat a lot of starches and sugars or not? A well-known author and mental health clinician who believes in an ancestral health approach to genera Continue reading >>

Diabetes (blood Glucose)

Diabetes (blood Glucose)

What is diabetes? Diabetes Mellitus as it is known in full, is a common health condition where there is too much glucose in the blood. Glucose is a type of sugar that comes from carbohydrates in the food we eat and is also produced by the liver and is our body’s main source of energy. Most of the food we eat is broken down into glucose. The level of glucose in the blood is regulated by a hormone called insulin. Insulin stimulates cells to absorb enough glucose from the blood for the energy they need. Insulin also stimulates the liver to absorb and store any glucose that’s left over. People who have diabetes either do not produce insulin, produce insufficient insulin or the insulin they do produce does not work properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Insulin is made by a gland called the pancreas, which lies just behind the stomach. Insulin allows glucose to move from the blood into the body’s millions of cells and be converted into energy needed for daily life. There are 2 main types of diabetes Type 1, also known as insulin dependent diabetes, develops when the insulin producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed and the person stops producing their own insulin. This may be due to a combination of hereditary and environmental factors, but it could also be as a result of damage to the pancreas from a virus. It generally affects children and young adults of both sexes and will usually become apparent before the age of 40. Type 2, also known as non insulin dependent diabetes, is the most common type of diabetes. Type 2 usually appears in older people (over 40) though as levels of obesity in the UK are rising, more and more younger people are being diagnosed. Type 2 happens when the pancreas fails to produce enough in Continue reading >>

Why Is Your Dog Aggressive?

Why Is Your Dog Aggressive?

If your dog becomes aggressive, don’t assume it’s a behavioral problem or that he’s just being “bad”. It could mean he’s ill or in pain. Jake was a cheerful, loving dog. The Shih tzu cross was friendly with everyone and enjoyed romps at the local dog park. Then one day, without warning, he became aggressive and bit his person, Meg, when she tried to pet him. Hurt and shocked, she took Jake to the vet where she learned he had a painful ear infection that made him sensitive to touch. With the proper treatment, Jake was soon back to his sociable and affectionate self. Not all dogs are as fortunate as Jake. Every year, thousands of aggressive dogs find themselves in shelters because their families assume they’ve developed behavioral problems that can’t be fixed. Many of these dogs are euthanized because they are deemed untrainable. Whether a dog’s aggression occurs suddenly or develops gradually over time, it’s important to consider the possibility that the cause might be physical rather than behavioral. In fact, more than 50 medical conditions can turn Fido into Cujo. They include injury, arthritis, congential defects, oral problems, ear infections, diminishing eyesight and more. Behaviors arising from such physical problems can include “growling, baring of teeth, and tail tucked between the legs if the dog is fearful,” according to veterinarian Dr. Mark Newkirk. “The tail may also be up or straight out in a dominant position.” Snapping and biting may also occur, depending on the problem. Because we usually associate these postures with anger or fear, it’s natural to assume they spring from behavorial rather than physical causes, especially if there are no other visible symptoms. But before seeking the help of a trainer or behavior specialist, Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Symptoms Of Diabetic Shock

Diabetic shock occurs when blood sugar levels plummet, causing a disruption in the proper functioning of the body and brain. A significant drop in blood sugar due to excessive insulin is called hypoglycemia; diabetic shock is an extreme result of this condition. Diabetic shock, also called insulin shock, is a serious health risk for diabetics. It is important for people to recognize early symptoms so that the diabetic can receive the medical attention he or she needs. Symptoms Mental State The brain is one of the first parts of the body to be affected by this severe blood sugar drop. Some mental changes that could indicate diabetic shock are: Confusion Memory loss Irritability Aggressive behavior Difficulty engaging in conversation Physical Symptoms Physical symptoms to be on alert for are: Dizziness Weakness Lethargy Hunger Sweating Rapid heart rate Headaches Unconsciousness If the hypoglycemia goes untreated, the body will no longer be able to function and the diabetic will faint and become unconscious. This person will not be able to be roused from this state. His or her skin might feel cool and sweaty, and his or her pulse will be either extremely weak or rapid. If untreated, the diabetic may go into a coma. Seizure With the brain not functioning properly, a hypoglycemic person may start to have seizures. When in a seizure, the person will fall to the ground and thrash his or her arms or legs. Muscles may start to twitch erratically. Treatment If the diabetic has not become unconscious or had seizures, the best way to raise his or her blood sugar level is to eat or drink something with sugar in it. Glucose tablets are also a good remedy for hypoglycemia. After eating a snack, the diabetic should test his or her blood sugar every 15 minutes and eat more snacks if the Continue reading >>

Sugar Vs. Sugar Substitutes: Managing Extreme Behaviors On The Autism Spectrum

Sugar Vs. Sugar Substitutes: Managing Extreme Behaviors On The Autism Spectrum

Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are often at a loss when it comes to extreme behaviors and the social, emotional, and physical challenges they present. Aggression and self-injury are more often observed in children and youth than adults, which may offer hope that self-calming and self-regulating behaviors can be instilled to some degree. Short-term solutions are devastatingly limited; however, there are a few alterations to lifestyle that have been shown to inhibit extreme reactions and promote empathetic behavior. Seratonin is produced naturally within the body, can be affected by environmental factors or stress, and have a direct impact on mood. Low seratonin can make an individual more agitated and “down,” while higher seratonin inspires feelings of happiness and positivity. To release more seratonin in your autistic child, make sure they are getting exercise and sunlight (even from indoors.) Serving foods high in tryptophan can also boost seratonin production: seafood, poultry, game, spinach, and egg whites, to name a few. Most parents regularly control the sugar intake of their children as a means of controlling or preventing periods of hyperactivity, moodiness associated with declining blood sugar levels, anxiety, irritability, and aggression. However, parents of children with ASD should understand that artificial sweeteners aren’t a viable substitute sugar when it comes to violent reactions. A study from Ohio State University found that individuals prone to react violently will show increased aggression when given a sugar substitute as opposed to sugar. “To be sure, consuming sugar should not be considered a panacea for curbing aggression,” says Brad Bushman, co-author of the study. “But the results do suggest that people wh Continue reading >>

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