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Diabetes And Abnormal Ecg

Electrocardiogram - Diabetes Self-management

Electrocardiogram - Diabetes Self-management

A test that measures the natural electrical activity of the heart. It is used to diagnose and evaluate heart problems. The electrical signals that regulate heartbeats start at the right atrium, one of the chambers located at the top of the heart, and travel to the bottom of the heart. As they travel through the heart, they signal the heart to contract in a synchronized fashion to pump blood throughout the blood vessels of the body. An electrocardiogram (also called an EKG or ECG) is used to determine how fast the heart is beating and whether the heart rhythm is steady or irregular. In so doing, it can uncover a number of potential heart problems, including a heart attack, lack of blood flow to the heart muscle, cardiac arrhythmias (irregular, fast, or slow heartbeats), and a heart that doesnt pump blood forcefully enough to meet the bodys needs. A commonly used type of electrocardiography, called a resting 12-lead EKG, is quick, simple, and painless. During this procedure, a technician attaches 12 electrodes to the skin on the chest, arms, and legs. Sometimes the technician shaves a persons body hair where the electrodes will be attached so that they will better adhere to the skin. As the person lies still for a few minutes, the electrodes pick up electrical signals from the heart and relay them to a machine that records these signals, either on graph paper or on a screen. The entire test takes only about 10 minutes, after which the electrodes are removed. This column is written by Robert Dinsmoor, a Contributing Editor of Diabetes Self-Management. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed Continue reading >>

Ecg (electrocardiogram): When You Need It And When You Don’t

Ecg (electrocardiogram): When You Need It And When You Don’t

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Download (pdf) ECG (Electrocardiogram): When you need it and when you don’t An ECG (electrocardiogram) records the electrical activity of your heart at rest. It provides information about your heart rate and rhythm, and shows if there is enlargement of the heart due to high blood pressure (hypertension) or evidence of a previous heart attack (myocardial infarction). However, it does not show whether you have asymptomatic blockages in your heart arteries or predict your risk of a future heart attack. The resting ECG is different from a stress or exercise ECG or cardiac imaging test. You may need an ECG test if you have risk factors for heart disease such as high blood pressure, or symptoms such as palpitations or chest pain. Or you may need it if you already have heart disease. But in other cases, you may think twice about having this test. Here’s why: Usually, you do not need an ECG if you don’t have risk factors for heart disease or symptoms that suggest possible heart disease. The test is not useful in routine checkups for people who do not have risk factors for heart disease such as high blood pressure or symptoms of heart disease, like chest pain. Yet, many people with no risk factors or symptoms have an ECG as part of their routine checkups. There are better ways to prevent heart disease than routine ECGs. The ECG will not harm you. However, it can sometimes show mild nonspecific abnormalities that are not due to underlying heart disease, but cause worry and lead to follow-up tests and treatments that you do not need. When are ECGs needed? In some cases, it can be important to get this test. You should probably have an ECG if you have risk factors for an enlarged heart such as high blood pressure or symptoms of heart disease Continue reading >>

Ecg Changes In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Ecg Changes In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. ECG Changes in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03260998 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Groups and Cohorts Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Diabetes Mellitus type 1 is characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency caused by T-cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic -cells . It is the predominant form of diabetes mellitus during childhood and adolescence. Hyperglycemia is a major cause of vascular and neuropathic complications that are seen in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Cardiovascular risk factors remain the most controversial chronic complication in diabetes mellitus type 1 Neuropathy in diabetes mellitus type 1 can lead to abnormalities in the response of the coronary vasculature to sympathetic stimulation, which may manifest clinically as resting tachycardia or bradycardia, exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, loss of the nocturnal decline in blood pressure, or silent myocardial ischemia on cardiac testing. These abnormalities can lead to delayed presentation of cardiovascular disease. An early indicator of cardiac autonomic neuropathy is reduced heart rate variability, which can be assessed qualitatively i Continue reading >>

Heart Tests You May Need If You Have Diabetes

Heart Tests You May Need If You Have Diabetes

Carotidultrasound.It uses high-frequency sound waves to give your doctor a view of your major neck arteries,called the carotids. He'll be able to see if you have any narrowing of your arteries that's caused by a buildup of fatty deposits called plaque. Computerized tomography (CT) of theheartand calciumscores.This imaging test can spot calciumdeposits in vessels on your heart. More calcium means more coronary atherosclerosis -- a hardening and narrowing of your arteries. Your doctor uses the test results to figure out your odds of having heart trouble. Electrocardiogram (EKG).It's a test that measures the electrical activity of your heart. Your doctor will be able to check for things like: Ambulatory electrocardiogram (Holter monitor).This test measures the electrical activity of your heart while you go about your regular daily activities. Echocardiograph(echo).It uses ultrasound to give your doctor a graphic outline of your heart chambers and their movement. He'll be able to check your heart's structure and motion, and see how thick the heart muscle is and how well the heart pumps. Exercise stress test. It's a treadmill test that helps your doctor find out how much blood flow gets to your heart muscle when it works hard, like while you exercise. You'll learn if you have less blood flow in the arteries that send blood to your heart muscle. Your doctor can use this info to figure out what a safe level of exercise is for you. Coronary angiography.This procedure, also known as cardiac catheterization, can help your doctor check how many artery blockages you have and how severe they are. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 2, 2018 Continue reading >>

Increased Cvd Risk With Ecg Abnormalities In Type 1 Diabetes

Increased Cvd Risk With Ecg Abnormalities In Type 1 Diabetes

Increased CVD Risk With ECG Abnormalities in Type 1 Diabetes Increased CVD Risk With ECG Abnormalities in Type 1 Diabetes Minor ECG abnormalities did not significantly correlate with increased CVD risk. Electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities may predict cardiovascular (CVD) risk in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.1 Patients with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for CVD, the leading cause of death in this population.2,3- In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes developed new ECG abnormalities, and 1 in 6 participants acquired at least 1 new major ECG abnormality over a period of 16 years.4 Limited data suggest that ECG abnormalities may be associated with a greater risk for CVD in patients with type 1 diabetes.1 In the EDIC observational study, Elsayed Z. Soliman, MD, from Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and colleagues evaluated the relationship between ECG abnormalities and CVD events in patients with type 1 diabetes.1 Based on the Minnesota Code ECG classification, ECG abnormalities were categorized as major (eg, complete left or right bundle branch block), minor (eg, isolated minor T wave or ST-segment abnormalities), or no abnormality. CVD events included stroke, congestive heart failure, first myocardial infarction, confirmed angina, coronary artery revascularization, or CVD-related death.1 Of 1306 patients, 155 (11.9%) experienced 1 or more CVD events during a median follow-up time of 19 years. Major ECG abnormalities predicted a more than 2-fold greater risk of CVD events compared with no abnormality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10; 95% CI, 1.26-3.48) and no Continue reading >>

The Ecg Vertigo In Diabetes And Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

The Ecg Vertigo In Diabetes And Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

Copyright © 2011 Christina Voulgari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy. 1. Introduction T he importance of diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, the prevalence of which is steadily increasing [1]. The decrease in cardiovascular mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind compared to that of the general population [2]. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. Diabetic cardiomyopathy, although a part of the diabetic atherosclerosis process, is a distinct clinical entity and may be independent of the coexistence of ischemic heart disease, arterial hypertension, or other macrovascular Continue reading >>

Electrocardiographic Changes In Diabetes Mellitus.

Electrocardiographic Changes In Diabetes Mellitus.

1. Physiol Res. 2015;64 Suppl 5:S559-66. Epub 2015 Dec 15. Electrocardiographic changes in diabetes mellitus. (1)Institute of Physiology, First Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. [email protected] Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been known for many years to be associated with poorcardiovascular prognosis. Due to the sensitive neuropathy, the coronary arterydisease in diabetic patients is frequently asymptomatic. Also twelve leadsresting ECG can be within normal limits even in an advanced stage of coronaryartery disease. Therefore in addition to the standard ECG otherelectrocardiographic procedures started to be studied in order to find sometypical signs of myocardial damages caused by DM. Repeatedly reported resultsshowed in DM patients without cardiovascular complications the tachycardia,shortening of the QRS and QT intervals, increase of the dispersion of QTinterval, decreased amplitudes of depolarization waves, shortened activation timeof ventricular myocardium and a flattening of T waves confirmed by the lowervalue of maximum and minimum in repolarization body surface isopotential maps.Most of these changes are even more pronounced in patients with cardiac autonomicneuropathy. Comparison with similar ECG changes in other diseases suggests thatthe electrocardiographic changes in DM patients are not specific and that theyare particularly caused by an increased tone of the sympathetic nervous systemwhat was indirectly confirmed by the heart rate variability findings in thesepatients. Continue reading >>

Electrocardiogram (ecg Or Ekg)

Electrocardiogram (ecg Or Ekg)

The underlying rate and rhythm mechanism of the heart. The orientation of the heart (how it is placed) in the chest cavity. Evidence of increased thickness (hypertrophy) of the heart muscle . Evidence of damage to the various parts of the heart muscle. Evidence of acutely impaired blood flow to the heart muscle. Patterns of abnormal electric activity that may predispose the patient toabnormal cardiac rhythm disturbances. Quick GuideHeart Disease: Causes of a Heart Attack A recording of the electrical activity of the heart. Abbreviated ECG and EKG. An ECG is a simple, noninvasive procedure. Electrodes are placed on the skin of the chest and connected in a specific order to a machine that, when turned on, measures electrical activity all over the heart. Abnormally fast or irregular heart rhythms. Abnormal conduction of cardiac impulses, which may suggest underlyingcardiac or metabolic disorders. Evidence of the occurrence of a prior heart attack (myocardial infarction ). Evidence of an evolving, acute heart attack. Evidence of an acute impairment to blood flow to the heart during anepisode of a threatened heart attack (unstable angina ). Adverse effects on the heart from various heart diseases or systemicdiseases (such as high blood pressure , thyroid conditions, etc.). Adverse effects on the heart from certain lung conditions (such as emphysema , pulmonary embolus [ blood clots to lung]). Evidence of abnormal blood electrolytes (potassium, calcium, magnesium). Evidence of inflammation of the heart or its lining ( myocarditis , pericarditis ). What are the limitations of the ECG (EKG)? The EKG is a static picture and may not reflect severe underlying heartproblems at a time when the patient is not having any symptoms. The most commonexample of this is in a patient with a Continue reading >>

Prognostic Value Of Ecg In Diabetes Mellitus: The Danger Of Knowing Too Much

Prognostic Value Of Ecg In Diabetes Mellitus: The Danger Of Knowing Too Much

Rev Esp Cardiol. 2007;60:1015-7 - Vol. 60 Num.10 Prognostic Value of ECG in Diabetes Mellitus: The Danger of Knowing Too Much a Servicio de Cardiologa, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo, Spain Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a disease with an increasingly high prevalence leading to a rise in cardiovascular risk. Around 75% of patients with DM2 die with some sort of cardiovascular disorder, such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Indeed, the future increase in DM2, as a consequence of the rise in obesity with which DM2 is pathophysiologically associated, will be one of the main causes of the increase in cardiovascular death and disease in both developed and developing countries over the coming decades.1 Furthermore, the presence of diabetes largely determines the treatment pattern of major cardiovascular diseases,2 thus enhancing its role in cardiovascular disorders. Since Haffner et al3 noted that the cardiovascular risk in a patient with DM2 was similar to that of a patient without diabetes but who had suffered a myocardial infarction, it has been established that DM2 is associated with an equivalent risk to that of coronary heart disease (>=2% annually). In fact, the AHA4 and the ESC5 both consider DM2 as an equivalent of coronary heart disease and have recommended similar strategies and aims to those of secondary prevention. In spite of this consensus, however, certain controversy still exists about the cardiovascular risk of DM2. This controversy stems from the studies by Evans et al,6 who showed that the risk in patients with recently diagnosed DM2 is lower than that of persons who have already had a myocardial infarction. Since the publication of this report, frequent studies have appeared in support of one or other of the conclusions in an attempt to shed l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy And E.c.g. Changes Pahda S P, Manhas A S - Indian J Ophthalmol

Diabetic Retinopathy And E.c.g. Changes Pahda S P, Manhas A S - Indian J Ophthalmol

Diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of which is on the increase in all mechanised societies, is still a challenge to the medical science. It is well known that inspite of an adequate clinical control of the disease, an insidious progress of the degenerative vascular changes continues. With better therapeutics, the life span of a diabetic has appreciably increased and so have the accompanying complications. There is an increasing interest in the complications affecting the eye (retinopathy) not because they are responsible for the blindness but because they help us to assess the morbid state of various organs particularly the kidneys and the heart. One hundred and fifty diabetics with different grades of retinopathy and unselected regarding the age, sex, age of onset, type of therapy and level of control of the disease have been studied for abnormal E.C.G. changes. All the cases had complete ocular examination including slit lamp examination and detailed fundus examination after full mydriasis, with direct ophthalmoscope. The retinopathy was classified according to Burditt et al.1 into `Simple' and `Malignant' retinopathy. The patients were classified according to the changes present in more severely affected eye. Electrocardiogram for all leads was recorded in every case and abnormalities noted. A matching group of fifty diabetics without any ophthalmoscope changes in the retina also had their E.C.G. recorded and abnormalities noted. Distribution of the retinopathy sample according to age, sex and duration of the diabetes [Table - 1] reveals 86 males and 64 females ranging from 26 years to 73 years in age and from 3 years to 24 years in duration of diabetes. Maximum number of patients (97 cases) were in the age group 41-60 years and 74 percent of the sample (111 cases) h Continue reading >>

Abnormal Ecg & Diabetes Mellitus: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

Abnormal Ecg & Diabetes Mellitus: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

1 Excludes: E74 , Q77 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code E74 Other disorders of carbohydrate metabolism 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Type 1 Excludes diabetes mellitus [icd10data.com] Some of the symptoms include: Abnormal bones in the spine Claw hand Cloudy corneas Deafness Halted growth Heart valve problems Joint disease, including stiffness Intellectual [medlineplus.gov] Symptoms of syncope or presyncope and evidence of any potential rhythm disturbance on ECG should be evaluated. [link.springer.com] ECG and echocardiogram were also normal. [ijpd.in] The coexistance with type 1 diabetes is very rare, but the association with a latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adults (LADA) has never been reported before. [endocrine-abstracts.org] The study assessed the percent of generalized lipodystrophy (GL) patients with diabetes mellitus who achieved diabetes remission after investigational treatment with leptin [globenewswire.com] Sixty-nine patients without a severe ECG abnormality at study entry received a diagnosis of a severe abnormality on ECGs that were recorded during follow-up. [nejm.org] 38.7 3 17.3 4 24 5 5.3 Hypogammaglobulinemia 45.3 Cataracts 49.4 Gastrointestinal impairment 27.2 Diabetes mellitus 16 Need for pneumological evaluation 78.8 Patient report [revespcardiol.org] An ECG, and often an echocardiogram, will be performed to assess the heart's rhythm and function. [kennedykrieger.org] For example, heart valves may become faulty, abnormalities on the heart tracing (electrocardiogram, or ECG), or abnormalities of the main blood vessels such as the main artery [patient.info] Individuals with Turner syndrome have an increased risk of thyroid disorders, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, abnormal liver function, hearing loss and osteoporosis [clinic Continue reading >>

Ecg Test - Better Health Channel

Ecg Test - Better Health Channel

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a medical test that detects heart problems by measuring the electrical activity generated by the heart as it contracts. ECGs from healthy hearts have a characteristic shape. If the ECG shows a different shape it could suggest a heart problem. A doctor may recommend an ECG for people who may be at risk of heart disease because there is a family history of heart disease, or because they smoke, are overweight, have diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure. A doctor may also recommend an ECG for people who are displaying symptoms such as chest pain, breathlessness, dizziness, fainting or fast or irregular heartbeats. The ECG is a safe and non-invasive procedure with no known risks. An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a medical test that detects cardiac (heart) abnormalities by measuring the electrical activity generated by the heart as it contracts. The machine that records the patients ECG is called an electrocardiograph. The electrocardiograph records the electrical activity of the heart muscle and displays this data as a trace on a screen or on paper. This data is then interpreted by a medical practitioner. ECGs from normal, healthy hearts have a characteristic shape. Any irregularity in the heart rhythm or damage to the heart muscle can change the electrical activity of the heart so that the shape of the ECG is changed. A doctor may recommend an ECG for people who may be at risk of heart disease because there is a family history of heart disease, or because they smoke, are overweight, or have diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure. They may also recommend an ECG if a person is experiencing symptoms such as: fast or irregular heartbeats (palpitations). ECGs are often performed to monitor the health of people who have been diag Continue reading >>

Increased Cvd Risk With Ecg Abnormalities In Type 1 Diabetes

Increased Cvd Risk With Ecg Abnormalities In Type 1 Diabetes

Increased CVD Risk With ECG Abnormalities in Type 1 Diabetes Electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities may predict cardiovascular (CVD) risk in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetes Care.1 Patients with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for CVD, the leading cause of death in this population.2,3- In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes developed new ECG abnormalities, and 1 in 6 participants acquired at least 1 new major ECG abnormality over a period of 16 years.4 Limited data suggest that ECG abnormalities may be associated with a greater risk for CVD in patients with type 1 diabetes.1 In the EDIC observational study, Elsayed Z. Soliman, MD, from Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and colleagues evaluated the relationship between ECG abnormalities and CVD events in patients with type 1 diabetes.1 Based on the Minnesota Code ECG classification, ECG abnormalities were categorized as major (eg, complete left or right bundle branch block), minor (eg, isolated minor T wave or ST-segment abnormalities), or no abnormality. CVD events included stroke, congestive heart failure, first myocardial infarction, confirmed angina, coronary artery revascularization, or CVD-related death.1 Of 1306 patients, 155 (11.9%) experienced 1 or more CVD events during a median follow-up time of 19 years. Major ECG abnormalities predicted a more than 2-fold greater risk of CVD events compared with no abnormality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10; 95% CI, 1.26-3.48) and no major abnormality (HR: 2.19; 95% CI, 1.46-3.29). Gender and HbA1c did not influence this risk.1 CVD risk associated with major ECG abnormalit Continue reading >>

Major Abnormalities On Ecg Tied To Cvd Risk In Type 1 Diabetes

Major Abnormalities On Ecg Tied To Cvd Risk In Type 1 Diabetes

Major abnormalities on ECG tied to CVD risk in type 1 diabetes Soliman EZ, et al. Diabetes Care. 2017;doi:10.2337/dc16-2050. Major abnormalities on an electrocardiogram may be useful for predicting the development of cardiovascular disease in adults with type 1 diabetes, according to findings published in Diabetes Care. Elsayed Z. Soliman, MD, of the Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center, department of epidemiology and prevention and department of medicine, section on cardiology, at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and colleagues evaluated data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) study on 1,306 adults (mean age, 35.5 years) with type 1 diabetes to determine the prevalence and incidence of ECG abnormalities with the development of CVD . Follow-up was a median of 19 years. The Minnesota Code ECG classification was used to define ECG abnormalities as major, minor or none. First occurrence of myocardial infarction, stroke, confirmed angina, coronary artery revascularization, congestive heart failure or death from any CVD were used to define CVD events. Through follow-up, 11.9% of participants developed CVD events for an incidence of 46.8 per 10,000 person-years. Most events were nonfatal (n = 148) and included 34 participants with clinical MI, 38 with silent MI, 16 with confirmed angina pectoris, 39 with coronary revascularization, three with congestive heart failure and 18 with stroke. Seven events were fatal and included two participants with sudden death. The risk for a CVD event was increased more than 2.5 times with the presence of any major ECG abnormality compared with no abnormality/normal ECG (HR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.62-4.4) or no major abnormality Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Electrocardiogram With Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome In Japanese-brazilians

Relationship Between Electrocardiogram With Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome In Japanese-brazilians

BACKGROUND: When the Japanese immigrated to the Americas, they were subjected to Westernization, with a great change in lifestyle, specially in dietary habits, and this may explain the increase in the incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease among them. OBJECTIVE: To study the presence of myocardial necrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in a population of Japanese-Brazilians, using the ECG and its relationship with DM and MS. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study which evaluated 1,042 Japanese-Brazilians aged 30 or over, 202 of them born in Japan (Issei) and 840 of them born in Brazil (Nissei), from the second phase of the Japanese-Brazilian Diabetes Study Group initiated in 2000. MS was defined according to the NCEP-ATP III criteria modified for the Japanese. DM and MS were associated with the presence of myocardial necrosis (according to the Minnesota criteria) and LVH (according the Perugia score on the ECG). The statistic chi square method was used to reject the null hypothesis. RESULTS: Of the 1,042 participants, 35.3% had DM (38.6% of the Issei and 34.5% of the Nissei); 51.8% had MS (59.4% of the Issei and 50.0% of the Nissei). The presence of an inactive zone in the diabetic Issei group was not statistically significant when compared to the non-diabetic group, but among the diabetic Nissei group an inactive zone was present in 7.5% of them. There was a statistically significant correlation between MS and LVH in the Issei and Nissei groups. CONCLUSION: Metabolic disorders presented a high prevalence in Japanese-Brazilians with significant correlations with necrosis and hypertrophy on the ECG. Key words: Asia Brazilians; metabolic syndrome; diabetes mellitus; myocardial hypertrophy, left ventricular. The Continue reading >>

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