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Diabetes Alert Card

Community Help Sought To Get Diabetic Alert Dog

Community Help Sought To Get Diabetic Alert Dog

Community help sought to get Diabetic Alert Dog Photo providedLauren Smith, 10, a student at Williamstown Elementary School, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes on Dec. 11. Her family is attempting to raise $16,000 for a Diabetic Alert Dog for her. WILLIAMSTOWN Lauren Smith of Williamstown is a 10-year-old girl on a mission. A student at Williamstown Elementary School, Lauren was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes also called Juvenile Diabetes or Insulin-Dependent Diabetes on Dec. 11. She and her family have their sights set on raising $16,000 for a Diabetic Alert Dog to help manage her condition. In the process, they are hopeful they will spread awareness about Type 1 Diabetes and assist others in recognizing symptoms so that life-threatening circumstances can be avoided. I began noticing increased urination, intense thirst, lethargy and just a general washed-out look, Heather Smith, Laurens mother, said. The day I took her to be checked, her blood glucose was 509. We went straight to Nationwide Childrens Hospital in Columbus and spent a rigorous three days in the hospital with her most of that was spent learning how to dose insulin and to properly care for her. I am grateful that we were able to avoid Diabetic Ketoacidosis, which is a serious condition and onset can be rapid, Smith said. Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of Type 1 Diabetes. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. At times, these symptoms can be mistaken for the stomach flu, which can have devastating results, she said. Laurens family has partnered with Lily Grace Service Dogs of Sandpoint, Idaho, and 4E Kennels, which is located about an hour outside Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetic Alert Dog?

What Is A Diabetic Alert Dog?

Can dogs do the same job as advanced medical testing equipment? When it comes to blood glucose meters for diabetes, it appears they can. Thanks to our canine companions incredible sense of smell , diabetic alert dogs can function as blood sugar level detectors. Although dogs cant provide exact measurements like a blood glucose meter, and are not meant to replace them, they can alert their owners when those levels are out of range. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease affecting the bodys ability to regulate blood sugar levels. It involves the hormone insulin which has the role of controlling the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood stream. Diabetic people either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin their body produces. This results in blood sugar levels that are too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia results in severe, and sometimes life-threatening complications such as chronic kidney disease, eye diseases that can lead to blindness, nerve damage, and heart attack or stroke. In 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Also, over 30 million Americans were living with the disease. Diabetes has no cure, and requires careful management such as regular monitoring of blood sugar and sometimes treatment with insulin. Unfortunately, although insulin is essential for some diabetics, it can occasionally result in hypoglycemia, a condition where blood sugar levels go too low. Low blood sugar has complications just as dangerous as high blood sugar, making blood sugar monitoring even more critical. Interestingly, low and high sugar levels both release chemicals into the body that have distinct smells. Humans cant detect these odors, but dogs can. So just as a dog can be trained for bomb or drug Continue reading >>

How Service Dogs Can Help People With Diabetes

How Service Dogs Can Help People With Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among people in the United States. One of the things that makes diabetes so dangerous is that extremely low or high blood sugar attacks can come at any time with very little warning. By the time the diabetic individual realizes he or she is having a diabetic episode, it may be too late to get medical attention. This is where having a service dog can help. Some service dogs are trained to detect minute changes in smell that accompany a change in blood sugar, and to alert their owners that they may be in danger. Diabetic Alert Dogs Diabetic alert dogs are specially trained animals with service dog certification. They are trained to detect variations in the chemical balance of their owner’s body. Episodes of abnormally low or high blood sugar cause the release of chemicals into the bloodstream that change the way a person smells. A diabetic alert dog has a sensitive nose that can detect these variations, often before its owner even feels the effects. Once it detects dangerous blood sugar levels, the diabetic alert dog signals its owner to alert him or her to take insulin. How to Get a Diabetic Alert Dog Diabetic alert dogs can be obtained through various service dog registration services. You can check with various organizations in your area to see if they have diabetic alert dogs, but if you can’t find a local provider there are a number of organizations you can get in touch with online. A good organization will allow you to meet several dogs so you can find one that is the perfect match for you and your household. What to Expect from an Alert Dog Once your diabetic alert dog registers as a service dog, you are legally allowed to take it anywhere service animals are allowed. Service dogs are permitted in shops, resta Continue reading >>

Confessions Of A Non-compliant Medical Alert Id Wearer

Confessions Of A Non-compliant Medical Alert Id Wearer

Confessions of a Non-Compliant Medical Alert ID Wearer Confessions of a Non-Compliant Medical Alert ID Wearer Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Is there a medical alert bracelet there? If not, do you wear one when you travel? Ever wear one, fellow PWDs (people with diabetes)? Or maybe not a bracelet but a dog tag or other kind of alert? If you're anything like I've been for most of my three decades with diabetes, the answers to those questions is a resounding "No." Here's a news flash from my end of the medical alert ID-wearing spectrum: I've never been a fan, and it's been about 20 years since I have regularly worn one of these IDs. Yes, it's true. I admit to being a med ID slacker. Until recently. I recently took the leap and bought a brand spanking new alert bracelet that fits my tastes as a non jewelr Interestingly, I owe it all to one of the country's leading endocrinologists, who made an off-the-cuff comment recently about PWDs who don't wear these and set off a flood of emotions in my head. During the recent Diabetes Hope Conference on May 21, Dr. Bruce Trippe from Alabama said something that left some of us in the DOC scratching our heads. The medical alert ID issue came up during this multi-panel webinar that included several patient advocates and health care professionals, all talking about diabetes complications and what we can do to help talk more openly and hopeful about these issues. My memory's fuzzy on how it even came up, but at some point Dr. Trippe opined that he goes all Donald Trump and "fires" any of his patients who don't wear a medical alert ID. You could see Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Id Necklace

Free Diabetes Id Necklace

DRWF has been a strong force in getting the awareness and preparedness message across to the diabetes community by offering a Diabetes Identification. Currently, DRWF is the only resource that provides the identification for FREE by request. Our mission is to promote and educate the public about proper identification for those with diabetes. This identification is key when you are unable to speak for yourself in an emergency. You can request the FREE Diabetes necklace -with a self-addressed and stamped envelope sent to DRWF or you can order online. By wearing this life saving ID each day, you are in effect educating and sharing your knowledge of diabetes. Since announcing the Diabetes Necklace program in 1993, DRWF has experienced an overwhelming response. The diabetes identification necklace reads “I Have Diabetes, Please Test My Blood Before Treating Me.” Many people have found the “Diabetes ID” to be very useful and lifesaving. Many individuals have written in to tell us how useful and life-saving our Diabetes Identification Necklace is: “What a great idea, this could save me, I will wear my necklace every day.” “ I needed a necklace but I just couldn’t afford one. Thanks for offering this FREE service.” “I never used to wear any identification, but now I know how important it is. Thanks for making me realize what could happen if I didn’t have a diabetes ID.” DRWF is proud to offer a product that everyone can use in an emergency situation, and hopefully this will prevent accidents in the future. So spread the word to your diabetes community. To receive your FREE Diabetes Necklace, click here to fill out the Diabetes Necklace Coupon and mail your self-addressed, stamped ($0.69) request to the address below. FREE Diabetes Necklace 1832 Connectic Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dog Pvc Id Badge - 2 Sided - Star Of Life

Diabetic Alert Dog Pvc Id Badge - 2 Sided - Star Of Life

Although not a requirement, a Service Dog ID badge gives your service dog instant credibility by clearly stating that your dog is a service dog. The identification card are the size and thickness of a standard credit card and are very durable Our ID cards are NOT laminated pieces of paper, they are thick PVC Plastic (like your credit card) Service Dog ID cards and Service Dog handler ID cards have The United States Federal Laws on the back, including the United States Department of Justices phone number. The ID card will include your name, your dogs name and all pertinent information needed for identification After you checkout you will receive an order confirmation email, simply reply to that email with the photo(s) If you prefer you can mail us the photo, instructions will be in your order confirmation email. Ahead shotis preferable, we will crop if needed The Department of Transportation lists service dog identification cards at the top of their list and only verbal assurance is at the bottom. Service Dog ID badges can dramatically speed up your process of getting through airport security, entering stores etc. without arguments or confrontations. The Department of Transportation, also known as D.O.T., Service Animal Guidance for airlines states the following: Carriers shall accept as evidence that an animal is a service animal. Identifiers are classified as identification cards, other written documentation, and presence of harnesses, ID tags or the credible verbal assurances of a qualified individual with a disability using the animal. It is fraudulent to represent your dog as a service animal if it is not. Continue reading >>

Free Printable Medical Id Wallet Cards

Free Printable Medical Id Wallet Cards

Medical ID cards store your most important health information in one place. In a medical emergency, you may not be able to tell first responders about your specific health condition, which prevents medical personnel from properly diagnosing you. Medical cards help responders and medical alert professionals reach a faster diagnosis, provide correct treatment and eliminate errors. Many individuals with medical conditions opt to wear medical ID tags, but these items often dont provide enough information for medical personnel, particularly if you have many allergies, are taking numerous medications or have several serious conditions. Wallet medical ID cards provide the space to list all the crucial health information that could help save your life. If you do wear a medical ID tag, it is smart to engrave the phrase See wallet card, which will direct medical responders to your wallet card for additional health information. What Information Should Be Included on a Wallet Medical ID Card? There are numerous templates available for a wallet medical ID card. Some templates provide more information than others. If space permits, you should include contact information for your health care providers. However, there are a few pieces of information you should always include. Contact information of your emergency contacts Where to Find Free Printable Medical ID Cards It is important to keep your medical ID card up to date, but your health information, as well as any personal contact information, can change often. Paying for a medical ID card can become costly if you constantly need to update information. Several companies provide free medical ID cards or templates you can use to print the cards out yourself. Below are several options for free printable medical ID cards. MedIDs.com fea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Tips From Dr. Natalie Strand

Diabetes Management Tips From Dr. Natalie Strand

Those living with diabetes may find it a challenge to stay healthy—everyone can have conflicts when searching for the right balance of healthy habits, such as exercise, eating well and keeping your teeth and gums clean. From stress to self-care, life can be up and down when living with diabetes. Dr. Natalie Strand (winner of season 17 of “The Amazing Race”) knows this firsthand—she lives with type 1 diabetes. Check out her tips for staying healthy and leading a balanced life while managing diabetes: Ask for help! When I was getting married, I asked each of my bridesmaids to remind me to check my blood sugar [blood glucose] throughout the day and to remind me to eat snacks. I knew I would be distracted, and having a team helped to keep me on track. Go ahead and ask your siblings, team mates and friends to help keep you on track! Communicate with your care team. Make sure you connect with your diabetes educator, physician, dietitian and other health care professionals. Reach out to them with your questions, since they can often help to implement subtle changes to avoid completely overhauling your lifestyle and routine because of diabetes. Get involved. Get a local group together to fundraise, vent or just understand each other. Groups such as your local American Diabetes Association field office, TuDiabetes and BeyondType1 offer ways to connect with others living with diabetes in person or on social media. Connecting with the diabetes community can be a powerful way to help ease the burden of living with this disease. Keep doing what you love. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up things you enjoy. Make efforts to continue sports, travel and other hobbies, even if there is a learning curve to adapting with diabetes at first. Maintain go Continue reading >>

Lifesaver Campaign For Law Enforcement

Lifesaver Campaign For Law Enforcement

Special License Plates and Drivers Licenses Help is here for Mississippians with diabetes! Thanks to a joint effort of the Mississippi Legislature, the State Tax Commission and the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi, our license plate was launched in August of 2002 for people with diabetes. The DFM’s car tag helps alert law enforcement personnel when a driver may be experiencing a hypoglycemic episode and, consequently, driving erratically. The diabetes license plate signals to emergency personnel that the driver has diabetes, which, ultimately, could help save a life. The driver’s license has a purple star on the bottom of the license, indicating that the driver has diabetes. There is also a space on the license to list whether the individual is insulin dependent or takes oral medications. The license plate is also available to all Mississippi drivers with diabetes. The plate has the DFM’s logo on it and says “Defeat Diabetes.” There is no additional charge beyond your regular registration, taxes and fees for the license plates, if the car title is in the name of the driver who has diabetes. However, if the title is in someone else’s name, but the person with diabetes is the primary driver of the car, there is a charge of $31.00 for a diabetes license plate. Car tag prices may vary depending on the county. Forms: Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Service Dog Law - Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Service Dog Law - Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr

The Department of Justice published revised final regulations implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for title II (State and local government services) and title III (public accommodations and commercial facilities) on September 15, 2010, in the Federal Register. These requirements, or rules, clarify and refine issues that have arisen over the past 20 years and contain new, and updated, requirements, including the 2010 Standards for Accessible Design (2010 Standards). This publication provides guidance on the term service animal and the service animal provisions in the Departments new regulations. Beginning on March 15, 2011, only dogs are recognized as service animals under titles II and III of the ADA. A service animal is a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability. Generally, title II and title III entities must permit service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas where members of the public are allowed to go. Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the persons disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA. This definition does not affec Continue reading >>

Your Medical Alert: Jewelry, Wallet Cards, Tattoos?

Your Medical Alert: Jewelry, Wallet Cards, Tattoos?

____ Happens! You can’t prevent every bad thing from happening in life. Even if you follow all seven healthy behaviors for diabetes (healthy eating, monitoring, physical activity, risk reduction, healthy coping, problem solving and taking medication all the time) it doesn’t guarantee you a free ride. It is likely that at some point in life, something is going to go wrong and you will need medical assistance. And when you are in an emergency situation you may not be completely clear headed. If you are alone and unresponsive due to a hypoglycemic reaction, emergency workers may not know you have diabetes. Carrying identification indicating that you have diabetes can make a world of difference in getting the aid you need in a timely manner. It becomes much more crucial if you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 and take insulin. You should also seriously consider carrying diabetes identification if you are elderly, have a poor appetite and take sulfonuyreas. If you have hypoglycemic unawareness, the need to carry identification reaches critical mass. Hypoglycemic episodes can mimic intoxication or other medical emergencies. When your blood glucose is low, you need a source of quick-acting sugar to bring it up as soon as possible. You don’t want medical personnel wasting time trying to figure out what is wrong when they can use that time to give you needed glucose. Today you have choices; an engraved bracelet or a necklace identifying you as having diabetes is one way to go. These don’t have to be chintz looking. There are many styles available and many materials to choose from, including metals, leather, plastic and rubber. You can even combine medical alerts with time keeping; yes, there are watches that include a medical alert notification in their faces. No longer do Continue reading >>

Advance Preparation Is A Key Defense For Chronic Disease Management During Emergencies.

Advance Preparation Is A Key Defense For Chronic Disease Management During Emergencies.

Advance preparation is a key defense for chronic disease management during emergencies. When youre dealing with a chronic medical condition like diabetes, diligence and preparation are key. But when an emergency situation or natural disaster strikes at your home or workplace whether fires or floods, hurricanes, blizzards or even something like an unexpected auto breakdown the disruption of a normal routine and limited access to much-needed resources can create chaos. Being caught unprepared for these types of events can be potentially life-threatening to a person with diabetes. Thats why the American College of Endocrinology (ACE) created the My Diabetes Emergency Plan. Launched by ACE in 2006, in response to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the My Diabetes Emergency Plan is a convenient checklist that contains all of the essential items those with diabetes need to have readily available in the event of an emergency. On this site, you can download the plan in English or Spanish and view a step-by-step video demonstration of how to put your kit together. We also offer helpful resources for emergency preparedness officials, *first responders* and healthcare personnel to communicate with community members and patients for whom you care. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Continue reading >>

Perl Study

Perl Study

In people with diabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Over time, the high blood sugar can damage the kidneys. If this happens, waste and fluids build up in the blood instead of being filtered out of the body by the kidneys. Kidney damage from diabetes (known as diabetic nephropathy) begins without symptoms. Early signs are increases in serum creatinine (detected by a blood test) or increased amounts of albumin or protein in the urine (detected by urine tests). If the damage continues, the kidneys may fail and result in the need for dialysis or kidney transplant. In fact, diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. This may happen in up to 15% of people with type 1 diabetes. Controlling blood sugar and blood pressure can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse. Use of certain blood pressure medicines, such as ACE inhibitors (for example, lisinopril or ramipril), may also help protect kidney function in people with diabetes. However, despite these approaches, the risk of kidney failure in type 1 diabetes remains, and new treatments are urgently needed. Recent research has shown that people with type 1 diabetes who have blood uric acid levels higher than average are at increased risk of losing kidney function. Therefore, a promising approach is to use treatments to lower the level of uric acid in the blood. Researchers believe that reducing uric acid levels using a drug called allopurinol (used for many years as a treatment for gout) may help protect kidney function. Promising results have been seen in a few small studies, but these need to be confirmed by larger studies that include more people carefully followed over a longer period of time. The Preventing Early Renal Loss (PERL) in Diabetes Consortium is a group Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Case Of Emergency (i.c.e.) Card Pack

Diabetes In Case Of Emergency (i.c.e.) Card Pack

1 x DIABETIC ICECard with writable reverse 2 x Matching key rings with writable reverse for one emergency contact *NEW* 2 x Matching vinyl stickers in 2 different sizes *NEW* By popular demand we have created a specific card for Type 1 Diabetes. This is available in the Medical ICE section ( click here ) and as an option in all our SPECIAL OFFER multi-packs of 2,4,6 & 10 If you suffer from diabetes then you run increased risk of becoming unwell rapidly and being unable to speak for yourself when medical professionalsor anyone who comes to your aid. If you can be quickly identified as a diabetic then the cause of your symtoms can be correctly diagnosed and treated quickly.An ICE Card could provide this invaluable information in a timely manner. Plain and simple, an ICEcard is a card you carry with you everywhere you go. If you are ever in an emergency situation and are unable to speak for yourself, your ICEcard holds all the important information required by first responders to ensure your medical needs are properly and safely met. It also holds the contact details of the people youve selected to be notified just as the card says - in case of emergency. Cards are supplied in packs with matching Key Rings and stickers which help to alert first responders that you are carrying an ICEcard. The card is made of durable PVC with a fully writable reverse surface. Card dimensions are 54 x 86mm with a thickness of only 0.76mm (Same as your bank card). The ICEcard has been designed with the advice of first aid professionals, and with simplicity in mind. The words IN CASE OF EMERGENCY are displayed in bright, bold text along the top right hand corner of the card along with the International (ISO) symbol for First Aid. Do you have multiple medical conditions or a complex medical hi Continue reading >>

Americas Diabetes Challenge

Americas Diabetes Challenge

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