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Diabetes Alcoholic Beverages

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

Can Frequent, Moderate Drinking Ward Off Diabetes?

(CNN)It's not every day that medical studies say alcohol could be good for you. People who drink moderately often have a lower risk of developing diabetes than those who never drink, according to a new study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Men and women who hoist a few glasses three to four days a week have the lowest risks of developing diabetes, Danish researchers found. Compared to people drinking less than one day each week, men who drink frequently had a 27% lower risk while women had a 32% lower risk, the researchers said. Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose -- sugar -- levels are high. When we eat, most of our food is turned into glucose to be burned as energy, with a hormone called insulin helping our cells absorb glucose. People who have diabetes either don't make enough insulin or don't use it effectively. As a result, sugar builds up in their blood, leading to health problems. Past studies consistently showed that light to moderate drinking carried a lower risk of diabetes compared to sobriety, while heavy drinking had an equal or greater risk. Though the World Health Organization reports "harmful use of alcohol" contributes to more than 200 diseases and injuries, it also acknowledges that light to moderate drinking may be beneficial with respect to diabetes. Since an important relationship exists between drinking and diabetes, Professor Janne Tolstrup and her colleagues from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark studied the specifics. They began by gathering data from Danish citizens 18 years old or older who completed the Danish Health Examination Survey. The data set included 28,704 men and 41,847 women -- more than 70,000 participants total -- wh Continue reading >>

4 Tips On Drinking When You Have Diabetes

4 Tips On Drinking When You Have Diabetes

If your doctor's given you permission to drink, follow these guidelines to do it responsibly Drink with care Is there room for alcohol in your diet if you have diabetes? Perhaps, if you are particularly vigilant about its use. The first problem with alcohol is that it lowers blood sugar levels due to its effect on the liver. The second is that it is high in calories-almost as high as fat-but with few nutrients. If you get the green light from your health-care team that it is okay to drink on occasion, here are some useful tips. Pair alcohol with food Food acts like a sponge, helping to absorb some of the alcohol and in turn minimizing its effect on blood sugar. Likewise, sip your drink slowly to further slow absorption. A person with diabetes should always eat carbohydrate foods when drinking alcohol, and never drink on an empty stomach. Don’t drink when your blood sugar is low By taking consistent daily blood sugar readings, you will be in a much better position to make an intelligent decision about whether to drink. If your blood sugar is already low, there is no need to cause more problems by drinking. Moderation is best There are fewer risks to your diabetes, and possible benefits, by keeping to current guidelines: No more than one drink per day for women, two per day for men. But be sure your diabetes is well controlled. If weight loss is a goal, drinking may hinder progress, so discuss this with your health-care team. Keep the mixers calorie-free If you choose hard liquor, watch out for added calories due to the mixers. Stick with club soda, mineral water, diet soft drinks, Bloody Mary mix, or coffee for hot drinks. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Alcohol. Yep, some people with diabetes drink it. I do, on occasion. Some argue that drinking alcohol with diabetes isn’t the healthiest choice, but I could say the same thing about diet soda. Whatever your stance on it is, it is something that should be handled with care, especially when you are dealing with diabetes. As anyone with diabetes (or someone who loves a PWD) knows, it is a balancing act. Between food, exercise, hormones and the like, we are constantly chasing that elusive 100 mg/dl on the meter. Alcohol can really throw your blood sugars into a tailspin. Let’s not even start on carbohydrates in your drink. Your liver and its functions are a very big player in how you manage diabetes while drinking. Instead of helping to regulate your blood sugar, your liver is busy metabolizing the alcohol, which can result in some scary lows. Be prepared with glucose tabs and make sure to check regularly if you are having a drink. What to Drink? I like to stick to drinks that don’t have carbohydrates in them: a good red wine, vodka and club soda or Fresca, or an occasional martini are predictable for me. Plus, I don’t have to take any insulin with them which makes it easier. If I am having a beer or something fruity like rum punch, I make sure to limit how much I am having. I once had an endocrinologist tell me that after every 3 drinks make your fourth one with carbs. I don’t know how good that advice was, I don’t follow it… But I do stick to what I know, I test very often, and I make sure to eat something while I am drinking. Bedtime Cautions Yes, you should be cautious before bed even when not drinking but you need to be even more on track of what your blood sugar is when you are. I cannot stress enough to test right before bed (and before you brush your t Continue reading >>

Wine Protects Against Diabetes?

Wine Protects Against Diabetes?

Study suggests wine consumption offers greater protection against type 2 risk, compared with beer or other alcoholic beverages. In a study published in Journal of Diabetes Investigation, researchers concluded that any amount of wine — with certain precautions — can have a positive effect for type 2 diabetes. The pooled RRs for different alcoholic beverages indicated that all wine, beer or spirits consumption was associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the researchers. “In spite of the similarity, there were still diversities among different types of alcoholic beverages.” Wine consumption yielded a 15% reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, beer consumption yielded a slight decrease in the risk and spirit consumption yielded a slight reduction, although not significant. In an additional analysis for amount of consumption (low, 0-10 g/day; moderate, 10-20 g/day; high, > 20 g/day), any amount of wine was linked to a significant decreased risk for type 2 diabetes. Moderate beer consumption had a greater effect for reducing the risk for type 2 diabetes compared with the low consumption, but there was no decreased risk with beer consumption in the high category. There was a mild decreased risk for type 2 diabetes with low and moderate spirits consumption, whereas high consumption was linked to an increased risk. “The present meta-analysis demonstrates strong evidence that specific alcoholic beverages had different effects on reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes,” the researchers wrote. “Wine consumption was associated with a significant reduction [in] risk of type 2 diabetes, while beer or spirits consumption showed a slight decrease in the risk of type 2 diabetes. The study provides a new perspective to explore the association between alcohol Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Alcoholic Beverages

Eating With Diabetes: Alcoholic Beverages

Since you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you have hopefully started learning how various foods and beverages affect your blood sugar. But what about alcohol? How does it affect your blood sugar and how do you account for it when planning meals and celebrations? First, remember this: Alcoholic beverages do affect your blood sugar. And beyond that, there are other considerations that a person with diabetes has to keep in mind when choosing whether or not—and how much—to drink. We recommend that you discuss your use of alcohol with your diabetes care team. After that, here are a few general recommendations. Practice Moderation It's true that diabetes puts you at a greater risk for heart disease, and that you should be taking proactive steps to protect your heart health. Though some published research has suggested that consuming alcohol may be good for your heart, the potential benefits are very small, and are certainly no reason to start drinking alcohol if it is not something you would normally do. Only drink alcohol when your diabetes is controlled (typically defined as an A1C level less than 7%). Do NOT drink alcohol when you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. Moderation is defined as no more than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men. One drink equals 1.5 oz of distilled spirits, 4 oz. dry wine, or 12 oz. beer. Alcohol Guidelines for People with Diabetes All foods and beverages affect your blood sugar differently, and alcohol is no exception—even though this particular beverage is classified as a drug. Alcohol is neither calorie-free nor carbohydrate-free, and it impacts your blood sugar and can also interact with the medications you take. Several medications, including the diabet Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Alcohol?

Should I Drink Alcohol?

In Australia, drinking alcohol is generally acceptable and for many people is a normal part of social events. However, for as long as alcohol has been used and enjoyed, some people have experienced problems associated with it. Most people with diabetes can enjoy a small amount of alcohol. However, it’s best to discuss it first with your diabetes health care team. For people who are on insulin or certain diabetes tablets, alcohol may increase the risk of hypoglycaemia (‘hypos’). Guidelines Limit your alcohol intake if you choose to drink. Current guidelines recommend no more than two standard drinks a day for both men and women. For those who need to control weight or lose weight, it's a good idea to cut down your intake. It is also best to drink alcohol with a meal or some carbohydrate-containing food. One standard drink is equal to: 100 mL wine 285 mL regular beer 30 mL spirits 60 mL fortified wine 375 mL low-alcohol beer (less than 3% alcohol). It is important to remember: All alcoholic drinks are high in kilojoules and can contribute to weight gain Too much alcohol can increase the risk of developing complications by putting on weight and increasing blood pressure Drinking a lot of alcohol can cause hypoglycaemia if you are taking insulin or certain diabetes tablets Low alcohol or ‘lite’ beers are a better choice than regular or diet beers because they are lower in alcohol When mixing drinks use low joule/diet mixers such as diet cola, diet ginger ale, diet tonic water. Continue reading >>

Let's Start At The Beginning

Let's Start At The Beginning

You have diabetes. Now what? You are not alone. According to the International Diabetes Federation, it was estimated in 2015 that one in 11 adults had diabetes, and one in two was not even diagnosed. A diabetes diagnosis is an important first step in getting your disease under control. Learning that you have diabetes can come as a shock and be overwhelming. At OneTouch.com, we are here to help you. This site is designed to help you learn more about the disease: you'll find information on the importance of blood glucose monitoring and taking your medicine when it's prescribed – be it pills or injectables, including insulin. We'll explain the basics of eating healthy and being physically active. We'll show you some things to watch out for, and help you learn how to take care of yourself to help reduce the risk of complications. In short, we'll be here for you through your journey with diabetes, step by step. Yes, your life is about to change, but when you successfully manage your diabetes you improve your health in the short term and lower your chances of long-term health risks: you can live a longer and healthier life. Don't expect perfection. It’s not a race or competition. Just commit yourself to doing your personal best. Tell yourself that you're worth it. We'll be with you every step of the way. * IDF Diabetes Atlas (7th Ed.) (2015). Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation. Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Effect Of Alcoholic Beverages On Postprandial Glycemia And Insulinemia In Lean, Young, Healthy Adults1,2,3

Effect Of Alcoholic Beverages On Postprandial Glycemia And Insulinemia In Lean, Young, Healthy Adults1,2,3

Abstract Background: Ethanol's ability to inhibit gluconeogenesis might reduce postprandial glycemia in realistic meal settings. Objective: The objective was to explore the effect of 3 types of alcoholic beverages consumed alone, with a meal, or 1 h before a meal on postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. Design: In study 1, isoenergetic (1000 kJ) servings of beer, white wine, and gin were compared with a 1000-kJ portion of white bread. In study 2, the same servings were compared with water as an accompaniment to a bread meal. In study 3, 20-g alcohol portions were served as a premeal drink. Fingertip capillary blood samples were taken at regular intervals over 2–3 h. Results: In study 1, the mean (±SE) glucose scores for beer (58 ± 11), wine (7 ± 3), and gin (10 ± 5) were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those for bread (= 100). In study 2, meals consumed with beer (84 ± 11; P = 0.03), wine (63 ± 6; P < 0.001), and gin (80 ± 12; P = 0.007) produced less glycemia than did the meal consumed with water (= 100). In study 3, all 3 beverages reduced the postprandial glycemic response to the subsequent meal (67 ± 5, 75 ± 6, and 78 ± 4 with the beer, wine, and gin trials, respectively; P < 0.003). Conclusion:In realistic settings, alcoholic beverage consumption lowers postprandial glycemia by 16–37%, which represents an unrecognized mechanism by which alcohol may reduce the risk of chronic disease. INTRODUCTION Large prospective studies and meta-analyses have directly linked light-to-moderate alcohol intake with a lower risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes (1-4). Several mechanisms have been suggested to underlie the apparent protective effect, including ethanol's ability to raise the HDL concentration and reduce coagulatory activity. Moderat Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Alcohol And Diabetes?

Is There A Link Between Alcohol And Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you know how much micromanagement is involved in your day-to-day eating and drinking decisions. Keeping your blood sugar at the correct levels is a constant balancing act, and every substance that enters your body could tip that balance. Alcohol is one of those elements that must be very tightly managed. When consumed in moderation, it usually isn't a problem for diabetics. But drinking any more than the bare minimum can cause major trouble. For diabetics, there's a big difference between the effects of chronic and occasional drinking. Moderate alcohol consumption is generally fine, provided that the diabetes is well-managed. With very sensible drinking, the liver can easily do its job flushing out the alcohol -- blood sugar levels will rise, but they'll stay under control. Doctors recommend no more than two drinks a day for men and one for women, and they also advise sticking to low-alcohol, low-sugar beverages. Chronic alcohol use and continued binge drinking -- as well as drinking when your diabetes isn't controlled or your blood sugar is low -- can wreak complete havoc on blood sugar levels and can also worsen diabetes side effects. With the liver working overtime to clear out alcohol instead of doing its normal job of changing stored carbohydrates into glucose, blood sugar levels drop drastically. Heavy alcohol use can also aggravate diabetic eye disease and nerve damage. It's very important for diabetics to make sure they've eaten before drinking alcohol or best that they drink during a meal. The presence of food in the stomach slows the absorption of alcohol into the blood, which allows for more controlled changes in blood sugar. Even among non-diabetics, the double whammy of chronic drinking on an empty stomach lowers blood sugar and also w Continue reading >>

A Hypothesis: Moderate Consumption Of Alcohol Contributes To Lower Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes Due To The Scavenging Of Alpha-dicarbonyls By Dietary Polyphenols.

A Hypothesis: Moderate Consumption Of Alcohol Contributes To Lower Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes Due To The Scavenging Of Alpha-dicarbonyls By Dietary Polyphenols.

Abstract The world is experiencing an epidemic of type-2-diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This has led to increased morbidity and mortality, explosive growth in healthcare budgets, and an even greater adverse, if indirect, impact on societies and economies of affected countries. While genetic susceptibility to T2DM is a major determinant of its prevalence, changes in lifestyles also play a role. One such change has been a transition from traditional diets characterized by low caloric and high nutrient density to calorie-rich but nutrient-poor Western diets. Given this, one solution to the epidemic of T2DM would be to abandon Western diets and revert to traditional eating patterns. However, traditional diets cannot provide enough calories for the increasing global population, so transition from traditional to Western foodstuffs appears to be irreversible. Consequently, the only practical solution to problems caused by these changes is to modify Western diets, possibly by supplementing them with functional foods containing nutrients that would compensate for these dietary deficits. I present in this study a hypothesis to explain why shifts from traditional to Western diets have been so problematic and to suggest nutrients that may counteract these adverse effects. I postulate that the components of traditional diets that may compensate for deficiencies of Westerns diets are scavengers of reactive α-dicarbonyls produced as unavoidable by-products of glucose and lipid metabolism. Most important among these scavengers are some plant secondary metabolites: polyphenols, phlorotannins, and carotenoids. They are found in alcoholic beverages and are abundant in seasonings, cocoa, coffee, tea, whole grains, pigmented vegetables, fruits, and berries. Continue reading >>

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