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Diabetes Alcoholic Beverages

Eating With Diabetes: Alcoholic Beverages

Eating With Diabetes: Alcoholic Beverages

Since you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you have hopefully started learning how various foods and beverages affect your blood sugar. But what about alcohol? How does it affect your blood sugar and how do you account for it when planning meals and celebrations? First, remember this: Alcoholic beverages do affect your blood sugar. And beyond that, there are other considerations that a person with diabetes has to keep in mind when choosing whether or not—and how much—to drink. We recommend that you discuss your use of alcohol with your diabetes care team. After that, here are a few general recommendations. Practice Moderation It's true that diabetes puts you at a greater risk for heart disease, and that you should be taking proactive steps to protect your heart health. Though some published research has suggested that consuming alcohol may be good for your heart, the potential benefits are very small, and are certainly no reason to start drinking alcohol if it is not something you would normally do. Only drink alcohol when your diabetes is controlled (typically defined as an A1C level less than 7%). Do NOT drink alcohol when you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. Moderation is defined as no more than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men. One drink equals 1.5 oz of distilled spirits, 4 oz. dry wine, or 12 oz. beer. Alcohol Guidelines for People with Diabetes All foods and beverages affect your blood sugar differently, and alcohol is no exception—even though this particular beverage is classified as a drug. Alcohol is neither calorie-free nor carbohydrate-free, and it impacts your blood sugar and can also interact with the medications you take. Several medications, including the diabet Continue reading >>

Specific Types Of Alcoholic Beverage Consumption And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Specific Types Of Alcoholic Beverage Consumption And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Abstract Previous meta-analyses identified an inverse association of total alcohol consumption with the risk of type 2 diabetes. The current study further explored the relationship between specific types of alcoholic beverage and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. A search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases from January 1966 to February 2016 was carried out for prospective cohort studies that assessed the effects of specific types of alcoholic beverage on the risk of type 2 diabetes. The pooled relative risks with 95% confidence interval were calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Results A total of 13 prospective studies were included in this meta-analysis, with 397,296 study participants and 20,641 cases of type 2 diabetes. Relative to no or rare alcohol consumption, wine consumption was associated with a significant reduction of the risk of type 2 diabetes, with the pooled relative risks of 0.85, whereas beer or spirits consumption led to a slight trend of decreasing risk of type 2 diabetes (relative risk 0.96, 0.95, respectively). Further dose–response analysis showed a U-shaped relationship between all three alcohol types and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, the peak risk reduction emerged at 20–30 g/day for wine and beer, and at 7–15 g/day for spirits, with a decrease of 20, 9 and 5%, respectively. Compared with beer or spirits, wine was associated with a more significant decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. The present study showed that wine might be more helpful for protection against type 2 diabetes than beer or spirits. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Alcohol can worsen diabetes-related nerve damage.(RON CHAPPLE STOCK/CORBIS)Hoping for a beer at the ball game, or a glass of wine with dinner? If you have type 2 diabetes, that's probably OK as long as your blood sugar is under control, you don't have any complications that are affected by alcohol (such as high blood pressure), and you know how the drink will affect your blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association. An alcohol-containing drink a day might even help your heart (though if you don't already drink, most experts say that's not a reason to start). In moderation, alcohol may cut heart disease risk According to a study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, women with type 2 diabetes who drank relatively small amounts of alcohol had a lower heart-disease risk than those who abstained. A second study found that men with diabetes had the same reduction in heart risk with a moderate alcohol intake as non-diabetic men. In general, the recommendations for alcohol consumption for someone with type 2 diabetes are the same as anyone else: no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women. (Make sure to measure: A drink serving is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor such as scotch, gin, tequila, or vodka.) People with diabetes who choose to drink need to take extra care keeping food, medications, alcohol, and blood sugars in balance. Janis Roszler, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Miami, Fla., recommends: Mixing alcoholic drinks with water or calorie-free diet sodas instead of sugary (and calorie- and carbohydrate-laden) sodas and other mixers. Once you have had your drink, switch to a non-alcoholic drink, such as sparkling water, for the rest of the evening. Make sure yo Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Three To Four Days A Week 'could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes'

Drinking Alcohol Three To Four Days A Week 'could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes'

Drinking alcohol three or four days each week can significantly protect against developing diabetes, a study has found. Going for a drink or consuming alcohol at home most days was associated with a reduced risk of 27 per cent in men and 32 per cent in women, compared with abstaining. Wine had the biggest effect, probably because it contains chemical compounds that improve blood sugar balance, said researchers. But there was a warning to women to stay clear of the gin bottle. A daily tipple of “mothers' ruin” or other spirits increased the diabetes risk to women by 83 per cent. Previous studies had already suggested that light to moderate alcohol consumption can cut the risk of diabetes, but the new research is the first to focus on drinking frequency. Scientists studied data on 70,551 men and women taking part in a large Danish health survey who were quizzed about their drinking habits and monitored for five years. The authors, led by Professor Janne Tolstrup from the University of Southern Denmark, wrote in the journal Diabetologia: “Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetes and that consumption of alcohol over 3 to 4 weekdays is associated with the lowest risks of diabetes, even after taking average weekly alcohol consumption into account.” During the follow-up period, a total of 859 men and 887 women from the study group developed diabetes. The investigation did not distinguish between the two forms of diabetes, Type 1 and the much more common Type 2. In terms of the amount of alcohol consumed, men who downed 14 drinks per week were 43 per cent less likely to develop diabetes than those who drank nothing. The diabetes risk to women who consumed nine drinks per week was 58 per cent lower than it was for non-d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcoholic Beverages

Diabetes And Alcoholic Beverages

People with diabetes need to be very careful if they plan on drinking anything that contains alcohol. The reason for this is consuming alcohol can have a severe impact on blood sugar levels, raising or lowering it dramatically, which can be very dangerous. Here are some of the ways that consuming alcohol can affect diabetes: • It affects liver function which is important for regulating blood sugar levels • There may be an interaction with diabetes controlling medications that can lower blood sugar too much • Some alcoholic beverages contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels • It acts as an appetite stimulant causing a person to overeat • It can numb the senses which may already be impaired by diabetes Alcoholic beverages should be consumed in small quantities, no more than two drinks for men and one for women in a 24 hour time span. Drinks should be taken with food which will help with its absorption. It is important to consume alcohol slowly to give the body a chance to process it. It is also important to stay away from alcoholic beverages that are mixed with anything sugary. If a person has diabetes and they feel like they must have an alcoholic beverage from time to time, consult a physician to understand how alcohol will interact with medications. All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. We a Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Alcohol?

Should I Drink Alcohol?

In Australia, drinking alcohol is generally acceptable and for many people is a normal part of social events. However, for as long as alcohol has been used and enjoyed, some people have experienced problems associated with it. Most people with diabetes can enjoy a small amount of alcohol. However, it’s best to discuss it first with your diabetes health care team. For people who are on insulin or certain diabetes tablets, alcohol may increase the risk of hypoglycaemia (‘hypos’). Guidelines Limit your alcohol intake if you choose to drink. Current guidelines recommend no more than two standard drinks a day for both men and women. For those who need to control weight or lose weight, it's a good idea to cut down your intake. It is also best to drink alcohol with a meal or some carbohydrate-containing food. One standard drink is equal to: 100 mL wine 285 mL regular beer 30 mL spirits 60 mL fortified wine 375 mL low-alcohol beer (less than 3% alcohol). It is important to remember: All alcoholic drinks are high in kilojoules and can contribute to weight gain Too much alcohol can increase the risk of developing complications by putting on weight and increasing blood pressure Drinking a lot of alcohol can cause hypoglycaemia if you are taking insulin or certain diabetes tablets Low alcohol or ‘lite’ beers are a better choice than regular or diet beers because they are lower in alcohol When mixing drinks use low joule/diet mixers such as diet cola, diet ginger ale, diet tonic water. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Drinking Alcohol Regularly Could Reduce Risk Of Disease

Type 2 Diabetes: Drinking Alcohol Regularly Could Reduce Risk Of Disease

Alcohol in moderation could avoid the need for painful daily injections for type 2 diabetes sufferers. It's associated with a reduced risk of diabetes in both men and women, according to a new study published in Diabetologia. Experts have found with alcohol consumption over 3 to 4 week days giving the lowest risks of diabetes. They study analysed 70,000 participants who gave detail of alcohol consumption. Participants were told two record the amount of alcohol they consumed in questionnaires. Participants were also asked whether their alcohol consumption had increased, decreased or remained stable over the previous five years. The data was adjusted to take the following factors into consideration: age, sex, level of education, body mass index, smoking status, diet, leisure time activity, current or previous hypertension and family history of diabetes. During follow up, 859 men and 887 women developed diabetes. In terms of weekly alcohol amount, the lowest risk of developing diabetes being found in individuals consuming moderate amounts of alcohol. Men consuming 14 drinks per week were found to have a 43 per cent lower risk of diabetes relative to no alcohol intake, and women consuming nine drinks per week had a 58 per cent lower risk compared with women who did not drink at all. In terms of frequency, the data revealed that consumption of alcohol three to four days a week gave the lowest risk of diabetes – a 27 per cent lower risk in men and a 32 per cent lower risk in women – when compared to individuals drinking less than one day per week. However women who drink spirits frequently had an increased risk of diabetes, the study found. The authors conclude: “Our findings suggest that alcohol drinking frequency is associated with the risk of diabetes and that consum Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Alcohol. Yep, some people with diabetes drink it. I do, on occasion. Some argue that drinking alcohol with diabetes isn’t the healthiest choice, but I could say the same thing about diet soda. Whatever your stance on it is, it is something that should be handled with care, especially when you are dealing with diabetes. As anyone with diabetes (or someone who loves a PWD) knows, it is a balancing act. Between food, exercise, hormones and the like, we are constantly chasing that elusive 100 mg/dl on the meter. Alcohol can really throw your blood sugars into a tailspin. Let’s not even start on carbohydrates in your drink. Your liver and its functions are a very big player in how you manage diabetes while drinking. Instead of helping to regulate your blood sugar, your liver is busy metabolizing the alcohol, which can result in some scary lows. Be prepared with glucose tabs and make sure to check regularly if you are having a drink. What to Drink? I like to stick to drinks that don’t have carbohydrates in them: a good red wine, vodka and club soda or Fresca, or an occasional martini are predictable for me. Plus, I don’t have to take any insulin with them which makes it easier. If I am having a beer or something fruity like rum punch, I make sure to limit how much I am having. I once had an endocrinologist tell me that after every 3 drinks make your fourth one with carbs. I don’t know how good that advice was, I don’t follow it… But I do stick to what I know, I test very often, and I make sure to eat something while I am drinking. Bedtime Cautions Yes, you should be cautious before bed even when not drinking but you need to be even more on track of what your blood sugar is when you are. I cannot stress enough to test right before bed (and before you brush your t Continue reading >>

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

Alcoholism And Diabetes: Exploring The Connection

According to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014, 29 million people in the U.S. (9.3 percent of the population) have diabetes. About 86 million adults have pre-diabetes, a condition that significantly increases their risks of developing diabetes. The onset of diabetes or concerns over the risk of developing the disease prompts many people to examine their food and lifestyle choices. Among the questions that top their minds is “Can I drink if I have diabetes?” According to the American Diabetes Association, most people with diabetes can drink a moderate amount of alcohol if their blood sugar level is well under control. The key here is moderation. Moderate amount of alcohol is known to be beneficial for the heart and can reduce the risk of developing heart disease. However, you should always consult your doctor to find out if alcohol is safe for you. Before delving into the correlation between alcoholism and diabetes, learn more about diabetes. This knowledge will help you understand why doctors and scientists warn against excessive drinking. Diabetes is a life-long condition where either the body (the pancreas) does not produce adequate insulin or the insulin does not work as expected. Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the conversion of glucose in the bloodstream to cellular energy that fuels us. Diabetics have an excess of glucose in the bloodstream. Over time, excessive blood glucose levels damage all the major organs of the body, like the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Unmanaged diabetes can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, strokes, nerve damage, blindness, and kidney failure. Diabetes: Type I and Type II The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases classifies the types of diabetes. Type I diabetes is the least common Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Diabetes

Alcohol & Diabetes

As a general rule, there is no need to avoid alcohol because you have diabetes. You should not drink alcohol if you: Are pregnant or trying to get pregnant Are breastfeeding Have a personal or family history of drinking problems Are planning to drive or engage in other activities that require attention or skill Are taking certain medications. Ask your pharmacist about your medications. Consider the following questions when deciding what is best for you: Is my diabetes under control? Am I free from health problems that alcohol can make worse such as disease of the pancreas, eye disease, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, liver problems, nerve damage or stroke? Do I know how to prevent and treat low blood glucose (sugar)? If you answered “no” to any of these questions, you should speak to your diabetes educator or health-care professional before drinking alcohol. If you answered “yes” to all of these questions, it is OK to drink alcohol in moderation. Moderate alcohol intake is limited to two standard drinks/day or less than 10 drinks/week for women; and less than three standard drinks/day or less than 15 drinks/week for men. This recommendation is the same for people without diabetes. Health risks of alcohol use You may have heard that alcohol has certain health benefits. However, any pattern of drinking can be harmful. Proven ways of improving your health include: healthy eating, being active, and being a non-smoker. Diabetes Canada’s Clinical Practice Guidelines recommend that: People using insulin or insulin secretagogues should be aware of delayed hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) that can occur up to 24 hours after drinking alcohol. People with type 1 diabetes should be aware of the risk of morning hypoglycemia if alcohol is consumed two to three hour Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Low Sugar Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics & The Effect Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Low Sugar Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics & The Effect Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol and diabetes can be two things that don’t go well together. Alcohol is basically a simple sugar that is processed like table sugar and will, of course, raise the diabetic’s blood sugar. This doesn’t mean that diabetics don’t have the opportunity to drink at all. There are many low sugar alcoholic drinks that diabetics can make use of that will be similar to the high-sugar drinks non-diabetics can drink but will have a lesser effect on the blood sugar. Most experts say that it’s perfectly okay for a type 1 or type 2 diabetic to have a beer or two, or a glass of wine with their meal and won’t face any major complication as long as they are otherwise vigilant about taking care of their blood sugar and don’t have other health problems, such as hypertension, which may be adversely affected by drinking too much. According to the American Diabetes Association, one alcoholic beverage a day—even for diabetics—may have benefits for their heart although it isn’t necessarily recommended that a diabetic patient start drinking alcohol if they don’t already drink some form of alcohol. Research has borne out the fact that small amounts of alcohol in diabetics can actually help reduce diabetic complications. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health studied women who had type 2 diabetes who drank less than two alcoholic beverages per day. What they found was that this small amount of alcohol actually lowered the women’s risks for heart disease over women who completely abstained from drinking alcohol. Another study done on men showed the same effect when men drank small amounts of alcohol each day. The recommendations for drinking alcohol in diabetics is no different than the recommendations for people without diabetes. The basic recommendation i Continue reading >>

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

back to Overview Tips & Tricks We recently held our annual mySugr holiday celebration. What a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right? Reviewed for accuracy and updated December 18, 2017 — SKJ Party time! You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages. In a situation like that, It’s all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. That’s totally natural – who wants to think about diabetes when you’re having a good time? I certainly don’t. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about? Pay Respect! Here’s the deal. If you don’t pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-off or perhaps more commonly, hours later when you’re sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, that’s when you’re least expecting it and when you’re at your most vulnerable. Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if it’s something you’d like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I’m not personally a big drinker, but I’ve done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe. We’re all different, but basics are basic… One of the most important things I can share is that we’re all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many people also differ in how they respond to alcohol. So like everything – your mileage may vary. In any case, there’s no harm in talking about some of the basic ways alcohol affects metabolism, and wh Continue reading >>

Beer And Diabetes

Beer And Diabetes

As beer contains alcohol, it can have an effect on diabetes. There is considerable scientific evidence that alcohol consumption of up to 24 g per day can lower the relative risk of type 2 diabetes by up to 30%. In people with diabetes, moderate alcohol consumption may improve glycaemic control and convey cardiovascular risk reduction and mortality benefits. These effects apply to all alcoholic beverages. Key messages Moderate beer consumption may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, because of the alcohol in beer. Alcohol consumption of up to 24 g per day can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes by 30%, and appears to be more pronounced in women than in men. Increased adiponectin levels, increased insulin sensitivity, reduction of fasting insulin, glycaemic status control, and anti-inflammatory effects, are biological mechanisms that explain this association. In addition to a healthy lifestyle, moderate alcohol consumption can also protect against type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes can also benefit from moderate alcohol consumption, with a lower risk of dying from coronary heart disease and a lower risk of microvascular complications. Diabetes in Europe There are about 60 million people with diabetes in Europe (type 1 and type 2, see box on Background of diabetes), and the prevalence of diabetes is increasing, already reaching 10–12% in some countries. 145 In addition, there is a large suspected number of undiagnosed diabetics. In Europe, about one in three people with diabetes do not know they have it. 146Of those with diabetes, 50% die of cardiovascular disease (primarily coronary heart disease and stroke), and 10–20% die of kidney failure.145,147,148 Alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes risk Population studies show a J-shaped relationship between alco Continue reading >>

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