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Air Force Diabetes Prevention Program Shows Promising Results

Air Force Diabetes Prevention Program Shows Promising Results

FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- I wish I knew this 30 years ago, is a common feeling among Air Force veterans after receiving diabetes education. Like most of the 89 million Americans with prediabetes, many active duty Airmen do not know the ways they can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. With 1 in 3 Americans at risk for diabetes, researchers and health professionals at the Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center in San Antonio, found it critical to implement and test the Group Lifestyle Balance program. The GLB program is a diabetes prevention program that was originally developed at the University of Pittsburgh and piloted at seven Air Force bases. The program targets those at risk for developing diabetes, including anyone with elevated blood sugars, metabolic issues, or a family history of diabetes. Diabetes, specifically Type 2 diabetes, is largely attributed to a poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Targeting these factors is at the core of the GLB program. The Diabetes Center of Excellence utilizes this program to help patients prevent or delay diabetes by engaging active duty, veterans, and their families in preventative health behaviors. Diabetes is a costly and progressive disease, said Nina Watson, a retired Air Force Lt. Col. and current certified diabetes educator with the Diabetes COE at Wilford Hall. Many people do not realize they can delay or even prevent diabetes just by changing their lifestyle. Initially the GLB program consisted of an intensive 12-week program that focused on overall health and behavior change. It has expanded to a one-year program that provides ongoing group and lifestyle coach support after the initial 12 weeks. The course relies on periodic, face-to-face meetings, weekly assignments, and group support. During this time, patients lear Continue reading >>

Air Force Diabetes Prevention Program Showing Results

Air Force Diabetes Prevention Program Showing Results

Air Force Diabetes Prevention Program Showing Results A program developed at the University of Pittsburg and piloted at seven U.S. Air Force bases is now being offered to all Air Force personnel. The Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB) program targets those at risk for diabetes, especially pre-diabetics, and teaches lifestyle changes that can delay or even prevent diabetes from occurring. "I wish I knew this 30 years ago," is a common response from Air Force veterans who also receive the education. With one in three Americans at risk for diabetes, the program seems especially important to today's Air Force. The 12-week GLB program has expanded to a full year. The GLB program was originally twelve weeks long, focusing on making those being taught the importance of making changes for the long haul. Now the program is a full year along, adding in lifestyle coaching and encouragement after that initial 12 weeks. Face-to-face meetings and weekly assignments, along with group support, are critical to the program's success. "Continuing education and support after the initial intervention is integral to preventing relapse and solidify behaviors," said Nina Watson, retired Air Force Lt. Colonel and current certified diabetes educator. Many members of the military, particularly younger ones, assume that because they can pass their physical requirements tests, they are not at risk for diabetes. The common misconception that diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar or not being healthy weighs heavily in this assumption. Breaking that belief and showing that anyone, at any time, may be diabetic despite their apparent good health is an important part of convincing young airmen that the lifestyle choices they are making now may have very adverse effects later on. The Diabetes COE progra Continue reading >>

A Genomics Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In U.s. Air Force Personnel.

A Genomics Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In U.s. Air Force Personnel.

1. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2009 Jul 1;3(4):770-5. A genomics study of type 2 diabetes mellitus in U.S. Air Force personnel. (1)Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas 78236, USA. [email protected] The military community is at high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D), especially asit relates to military beneficiaries, although preventive measures can beimplemented to reduce disease onset. This study evaluates the prevalence ofrisk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients diagnosed with T2Dwithin active duty, retired military, and military-dependent populations onLackland Air Force Base compared to nondiabetic controls. Results will be used asa basis of comparison to analyze risk-conferring genotypes in the young, healthy active duty population to generate the prevalence of T2D risk-associated factors in our current and future war fighters. Identifying genetic markers of T2D prior to abnormal glucose control and insulin resistance may ultimately adjust futurerisk through early detection, healthy lifestyle modifications, and diseasemanagement programs.Copyright 2009 Diabetes Technology Society. Continue reading >>

Effect Of Military Deployment On Diabetes Mellitus In Air Force Personnel

Effect Of Military Deployment On Diabetes Mellitus In Air Force Personnel

Effect of Military Deployment on Diabetes Mellitus in Air Force Personnel Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Center of Excellence, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, 1100 Wilford Hall Loop, Bldg 4554 JBSA-Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236 Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Center of Excellence, Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, 1100 Wilford Hall Loop, Bldg 4554 JBSA-Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Defense Health Agency, 3515 S General McMullen Suite 200, San Antonio, TX 78226 Search for other works by this author on: Division of Endocrinology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, MCH-ZDM-E 3551 Roger Brooke Dr. JBSA-Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234 Search for other works by this author on: Irene Folaron, Mark W True, Jana L Wardian, Tom J Sauerwein, Alan Sim, Joshua M Tate, Alexander G Rittel, Lee Ann Zarzabal, Sky D Graybill; Effect of Military Deployment on Diabetes Mellitus in Air Force Personnel, Military Medicine, Military deployments relocate service members to austere locations with lim Continue reading >>

Type Diabetes Ruining A Military Career And How ... | Diabetic Connect

Type Diabetes Ruining A Military Career And How ... | Diabetic Connect

Type 1 Diabetes ruining a military career and how you've reacted to it. By roxygyrl1970 Latest Reply2015-02-12 21:40:37 -0600 I was wonder if anyone else out there was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes after serving an extended amount of time in the military. After serving 4 years active duty (Desert Storm Vet.) on a ship, I was finally able to accomplish my life long dream of becoming an Equipment Operator in the US Navy Seabees, just like my grandfather (my hero) had been. I normally spent at least three months out of the year on extended military orders, and if they called me the day before asking me to go, I would drop everything and head out. When I was home, I wanted to be on orders. I loved operating all of the heavy equipment. Everyone who knew me, knew I was an EO in the Seabees. It defined who and what I was. I wanted to stay in forever. I was an adult who got to play in the dirt with huge "tonka" toys. You can't get better than that. We worked hard and played harder. Even if I didn't particularly care for someone, I knew when push came to shove we had each others back. Then diabetes happened to me. I had just came off orders from a fence line project at Goose Creek and hadn't been feeling well. I just thought I either had the flu or had bitten by a tick. I started drinking so much water that I was throwing it back up and still was thirsty. No one thought to say I might have diabetes. I was very active in the military. When it got to the point that my vision was so blurry I couldn't read a stop sign, I decided to go to the walk in clinic. I figured it would be some sort of rounds of antibiotics, slap a band aid on it and life would go on as normal. Well I told them my symptoms and they tested my blood sugar and it was over 600. When I told the old doctor I had d Continue reading >>

Recently Found Out I Am Type 1 Diabetic... : Airforce

Recently Found Out I Am Type 1 Diabetic... : Airforce

Last week I found out that I have type 1 diabetes. Went into the hospital with a blood glucose of 534 and an HGB A1C of 14.3%. I know I will see an initial MEB/RILO here in the future to see how well I'm controlling this. I have orders overseas and I am pretty much kissing those goodbye (on med hold for TDYs, PCSing, and deployments). Since I can't get a direct answer from pretty much anyone I ask at the hospital, clinic or any of the people I would expect to know, I am turning to you fine folks. AFI 48-123 say's "For diabetes controlled by insulin: Required long term use is usually not compatible with continued active duty. Retention is dependent on job qualifications and Command Support." I am insulin dependent currently and my job requires me to be able to be deployable pretty much at any time. I'm currently planning for the worst and starting to look for jobs outside the air force for something similar to my current job. Has anyone ever heard of type 1 diabetics staying in and finishing out their enlistment/re-enlisting? I know of several type 2's staying in, but that is a different case. Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

High Blood Sugar And Diabetes

I received several emails about helping the reader repair their diet. Here is a " Diet Plan "I refer people to with a motivating and humorous picture as well as a free downloadable sample week of diet information.I also have a newer plan called the " Get Lean Diet " that is very effective. Also seemy " Food Plan "(Word document)for more ideas.However, you should visit a registered dietician if you are severely overweight or pre-diabetic. Pre-diabetic refers to Type II diabetes and usually occurs in older and/or obese people who do not have to have a family history of diabetes. 80% of type II diabetics are overweight.This type of diabetes can be prevented or significantly delayed by watching processed sugar intake, add fiber foods, and regular daily exercise. Here is the related question.The former Army soldier writes: "My doctor says my blood sugar is too high and I have tried exercise, a no carbohydrate diet, and am having trouble keeping my blood sugar and my weight down." As you know I am not a doctor, but there are still two areas you need to focus on. The fact that you stated your sentence in the past tense causes me to ask - Are you still fairly active and exercise regularly? Daily? And - Are you watching portions and types of foods you are eating? You can have high blood sugar because you are eating foods or soft drinks or juices with sugar in them. It could be as simple as adding more fiber to your diet by eating fiber rich fruits / vegetables.But it can be fairly complicated as well as your body can make glycogen (blood sugar) just about anything.Glycogen is your go-to fuel source and is sometimes referred to as blood sugar. It is used by the body for major body functions and high intensity workouts.It is made from glucose which is found in almost every food, Continue reading >>

Can You Do This Job?

Can You Do This Job?

Nat Strand, MD, a winner of "The Amazing Race," lives with type 1 diabetes. Many careers are wide open to people with diabetes, but others have a ways to go. NASA evaluates all applicants on a case-by-case basis. Some athletes with diabetes include Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, NASCAR driver Miguel Paludo , LPGA golfer Michelle McGann, former Olympic swimmer Gary Hall, Jr., marathoner Missy Foy, and Tampa Bay Rays outfielder Sam Fuld . Zippora Karz was a world-class ballerina with type 1 diabetes and now teaches. Art Smith, Paula Deen, Sam Talbot, and Charles Mattocks are all successful chefs with diabetes. People with diabetes are able to pilot personal aircraft but are still banned from flying with passengers. The American Diabetes Association is fighting the ban. Prospective agents undergo a medical evaluation, during which those with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. The State Department requires all applicants to undergo a medical evaluation, during which people with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. Read about two diplomats . All branches of the militaryArmy, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guardbar anyone with diabetes from joining, though people diagnosed while already in service are not always discharged. Ginger Vieira, Cliff Scherb, and Simon Bennett are among trainers with diabetes. Prospective officers undergo a medical evaluation, during which those with diabetes are assessed on their ability to successfully manage their diabetes. Nat Strand, MD, won The Amazing Race with her diabetes gear in tow; it all had to fit in one backpack. School bus driver licenses are regulated by the state, however, so some states may still have restrictions. In the past, people Continue reading >>

Personalized Medicine For Diabetes: A Genomics Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In U.s. Air Force Personnel

Personalized Medicine For Diabetes: A Genomics Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In U.s. Air Force Personnel

A Genomics Study of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in U.S. Air Force Personnel Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas Correspondence to: Lisa Lott, Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory, 2460 Pepperrell Dr., Building 4429, Lackland Air Force Base, TX 78236; email address [email protected] Funding: The work reported herein is being performed at or coordinated through the Advanced Diagnostic Laboratory under Contract Award No. FA7014-06-C-0047 issued by the Air Force District of Washington and awarded to Eagle Applied Sciences, LLC. Disclosure: The opinions expressed in this document are solely those of the author and do not represent an endorsement by or the views of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or the United States Government. Copyright 2009 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The military community is at high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D), especially as it relates to military beneficiaries, although preventive measures can be implemented to reduce disease onset. This study evaluates the prevalence of risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients diagnosed with T2D within active duty, retired military, and military-dependent populations on Lackland Air Force Base compared to nondiabetic controls. Results will be used as a basis of comparison to analyze risk-conferring genotypes in the young, healthy active duty population to generate the prevalence of T2D risk-associated factors in our current and future war fighters. Identifying genetic markers of T2D prior to abnormal glucose control and insulin resistance may ultimately adjust future risk through early detection, healthy lifestyle modifications, and disease management programs. Keywords: genetic markers, ty Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Military

Diabetes In The Military

There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, learning from failure. Serving in the US military requires a certain level of physical fitness and freedom from any disability that may require excessive time lost from duty for necessary treatment. When civilians apply to join the military, therefore, they are required to pass a medical exam and to disclose information about their medical history. While not all medical conditions disqualify a person from joining the military, many do, and any type of diabetes generally does. Developing diabetes while already serving in the military, however, is not automatic grounds for separation (retirement) from the military. Several hundred service members (out of more than 1.4 million currently serving) are diagnosed with diabetes each year. Between 1997 and 2007, fewer than 6% of diabetes diagnoses were Type 1 diabetes , 80% were Type 2 diabetes , and the remaining 14% were not consistently reported as either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Because active service members have mandatory medical examinations and free access to health care, it is thought that there are few undiagnosed cases of diabetes among military personnel. Service members who develop diabetes and cannot maintain an HbA1c level below 7% without medication are referred to a medical evaluation board, which assesses their medical fitness and makes recommendations about follow-up care. As is the case for civilians, being overweight or obese puts a service member at higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In 2011, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center reported that between January 1998 and December 2010, nearly 400,000 of its active members had at least one overweight-related medical diagnosis. Factors that are most commonly correlated Continue reading >>

Air Force...new Diabetes

Air Force...new Diabetes

I am an active duty airman.About a month ago, I had a sugar attack, with my bloodsugar being in the 960s.Well, this was a shock to me.I had never had signs or symptoms prior to this. Well...my dilemma is what is going to happen wtih my career.Anyone know what the usual course of action is for a Type 1 Diabetic?I know I'll have to go in front of an MEB, but I"m clueless from there...Any information would be great! I am not a physician or in the military.I am a volunteer and mom of type one diabetic. I do not know for sure what will happen in your case. However if you have diabetes, before entering into the, military it can disqualify you from entering the armed forces. I would suggest you contact someone on base in the JAG - Judge Advocate Generals office to help you.(My dad was in the military).They will be better able to help advise you before the board.Depending on what your Job is you might get medically discharged, but they can help advise you better and help get you the services you need and to keep yourveteran benefits. I am sorry that I could not help give you more insight to what will happen.I hope all goes well for you. Please come back and let us know how things are going.Good Luck Continue reading >>

Proper Nutrition Can Help Manage Diabetes

Proper Nutrition Can Help Manage Diabetes

FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- Good nutrition is important for any healthy lifestyle, but for diabetics balancing nutrition, activity and medication is vital. Carbohydrates, for example, are nutrients found in bread, milk, starchy vegetables and fruit that turn to sugar in the blood. Other simple carbohydrates found in sweets and sugared drinks are the first to limit when monitoring weight and blood sugar. A person diagnosed with diabetes is lacking insulin or is insulin resistant so that the body cant process these sugars normally. The Air Force Medical Service has Registered Dietitian Nutritionists who can serve as a resource to Airmen and their families when they want or need to make a change to their diet. Its paramount to change nutrition to manage diabetes, said 1st Lt. Abigail Schutz, the Chief of Clinical Dietetics at Joint-Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The body responds well to decreasing total carbohydrates intake for blood sugar management. We also talk about pairing carbs with nutrients such as fiber or protein to control the rate of sugar going into the blood. Schutz said while she handles a lot of patients dealing with an initial diagnosis of diabetes, she also handles cases where people were initially diagnosed, and did not make the appropriate changes or need a review of the most current recommendations for diabetes management. Theres still a stigma against diabetes. Its super common but people still want to hide it or feel ashamed by it, Schutz said. It can be managed very easily with some education, and I do think its important to encourage folks to seek help. Schutz said people tend not to know how the disease works and they go into denial about the need for behavior change. Her role, and the role of other dietitians, is to help clarify all of that. For e Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic (air Force)

Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic (air Force)

Newly diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic (Air Force) I'm brand new to this site, and thanks for having me! I have enjoyed reading other posts here, and gaining a little insight into everyone's experiences. I myself have been going thru quite a predicament for the past 6 months, and I wanted to share, and get everyone's advice/thoughts/opinions. I'm a 16 1/2 year Air Force enlisted member, and in January of this year I was diagnosed with T1 diabetes. Originally they thought I was T2, but after tons of labs, they came back and officially diagnosed me with type 1. I started insulin shortly after going into the hospital, and I am now on 6 units per day of Lantus (long acting insulin), and 0-4 units a day of Novalog (fast acting insulin), depending on what I eat for meals. When I first got tested, my A1C was at 10.2, and now 6 months later, it is at 6.1. I'm working to bring it down even further into "normal" range by the time I take my next test. However, I am now getting medical boarded. Everyone I have talked to has said being insulin dependent is a career ender, and I better start planning on what to do on the outside. I have read the Air Force will not grant me medical retirement if my disability rating is less than 30%. I haven't found how they calculate their ratings, but I have read the VA website, and to get at least 40% rating, you have to be taking insulin, on a restricted diet, and have your activities regulated. I have met with a dietitian who explained to me what I can and can't eat (more like shouldn't eat), and how to count carbs...But she never really said I was restricted. Also, I was put on a profile for our 1 1/2 run, due to how fast my blood sugars drop when I do "strenuous" activities. I've never been one to skip out on running (usually my PT tests were in the Continue reading >>

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. As we approach Memorial Day and recognize those serving ourcountry, we thought it would be worthwhile to look at the ease with whichpeople with diabetes are able to serve in the military, and how that's changedthrough the years. Sadly, the picture isn'tas optimistic as we would have hoped. While access to militaryservice for PWDs has gotten a little better over time, not much has changed andit remains mostly hit-or-miss when it comes to someone being able to servedespite their condition. The American DiabetesAssociation's legal advocacy director, Katie Hathaway,says it's pretty much "a mixed bag" and military service is off limits for most PWDs. It comes down toan individual being able to educate a military medical panel that he or she canstill serve despite their diagnosis, often battling the same misconceptions andperceptions that plague those of us on the civilian side. Our battle is theirbattle, and the war spills into all ranks and military branches, apparently. Of course, we have totalk types here. Really, we're only talking about those PWDs already diagnosedwith type 1 or dependent on insulin at the time they wish to enter themilitary. The possibility of service pretty much becomes a non sequitur whenyou're living with a pre-existing condition. Growing up, I was toldspecifically as long as I could remember that serving in the military wasn'tpossible thanks to my type 1 diabetes. So that killed any thought of followingin the footsteps of my maternal grandfather who served in World World II. Iwouldn't describe it as a "dream" of mine to serve, but if I'd hadthe chance I might have explored it as a possible path. Sa Continue reading >>

Can You Join The Military If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Join The Military If You Have Diabetes?

It’s patriotic and noble to join the armed forces to fight for your freedom and country. Not only that, it can offer a fully-paid trip to college, early retirement, good insurance, a 0% down VA home loan, and a whole host of other perks. If you graduate from a military school, not only do you get a free ride, but you also get to go in as an officer after you graduate, with competitive pay and excellent benefits. If you are active duty, you get insurance through Tricare, which is pretty good insurance. More people have picked themselves up out of poverty by joining the military then by any other means, so it can be a sweet deal for some. What about Pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5, or Type 2 Diabetes and the military? But what if you have Pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5, or Type 2 diabetes? Will you be allowed to join the ranks of the military, and serve your country, or will you be told that you are unfit to serve? Will you be permanently disqualified for military service (PDQ’d)? This is a question that many people living with pre-diabetes and diabetes of all types have asked, especially since both have reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It would seem discriminatory for someone with pre-diabetes or diabetes to be told that they cannot serve in the military. It would also seem wrong to discharge a person in the military because they were diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes during their time of service. Here are some other popular questions our readers have asked: In researching this topic, this does seem to be happening on a regular basis, especially when you are trying to see a recruiter and get in, or when you are diagnosed while in active duty and do not fight the system to try to stay in. Let’s look at whether or not you will be told no if you Continue reading >>

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