diabetestalk.net

Diabetes Activities For Students

How To Help Students Implement Effective Diabetes Management

How To Help Students Implement Effective Diabetes Management

Check Blood Glucose Levels Plan for Disposal of Sharp Objects and Materials That Come in Contact with Blood Recognize and Treat Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose) Recognize and Treat Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose) Administer Insulin and/or Other Diabetes Medication Plan for Disasters and Emergencies Follow an Individualized Meal Plan Promote Regular Physical Activity Help to Maintain a Healthy Weight Plan for Special Events, Field Trips, and Extracurricular Activities Deal with Emotional and Social Issues Understand Why Diabetes Self-Management Is Important Diabetes management involves checking blood glucose levels throughout the day, following an individualized meal plan, getting regular physical activity, and administering insulin and/or blood glucose-lowering medications. These actions are taken to help maintain blood glucose levels in the target range and to prevent hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Students with diabetes must have access to supplies and equipment for immediate treatment of high and low blood glucose levels at all times. Additional elements of effective diabetes management in school include: planning for appropriate disposal of sharp objects and materials that come in contact with blood; planning for disasters, emergencies, and lockdowns; planning for school-sponsored events outside the usual school day; and dealing with the emotional and social aspects of living with diabetes. Check Blood Glucose Levels One of the most important diabetes management tasks is to check (or monitor) blood glucose levels throughout the day using a blood glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Students who use a CGM also use a blood glucose meter to verify CGM readings. Blood Glucose Meter A blood glucose meter is a small portable machine used to check blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lesson Plans And Lesson Ideas | Brainpop Educators

Diabetes Lesson Plans And Lesson Ideas | Brainpop Educators

Make-a-Movie Lesson Plan: Produce a Public Service Announcement (PSA) This lesson plan, adaptable for grades 4-12, invites students to explore BrainPOP resources to learn about a health or safety topic. The lesson may be used with a range of topics in units including Diseases, Injuries, & Conditions ; Nutrition ; Personal Health ; Psychology & Behavior , and more. After exploring the topic, students produce a BrainPOP-style public service announcement (PSA) using Make-a-Movie and plan their PSA using Make-a-Map. See more Managing Diabetes Lesson Plan: The Diabetic Dog Game In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-12, students use BrainPOP resources to identify the elements a diabetic needs to balance for healthy living. Students will identify the causes and effects of living with diabetes, and create an artistic expression of the "juggling act" a person with type 2 diabetes has to perform for healthy living. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards. See more Diseases, Injuries, and Conditions Lesson Plan: Raising Health Awareness In this lesson plan which is adaptable for grades 3-12, students take part in a hands-on activity to explore the difference between diseases, injuries, and conditions. Students then select a disease, injury, or condition that they or someone they know has been affected by and research prevention and treatment methods. They will use BrainPOP resources as well as other internet sites to develop research skills as they find, compile, and summarize information about health and raising health awareness. Finally, students will design a way to raise community awareness about their selected disease, injury, or condition, and/or a related foundation or charity. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards. Se Continue reading >>

Explore Diabetes With Student Stem

Explore Diabetes With Student Stem

By Amy Cowen on November 1, 2016 12:00 PM November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Students interested in science related to diabetes can learn more with hands-on science projects and activities. Exploring Science Questions Related to Diabetes When faced with a science project or science fair project assignment, students who have Type 1 Diabetes, or have a family member of friend with diabetes, often immediately think about exploring a science question related to diabetes. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) refers to a group of diseases related to the body's ability to produce or use insulin. Science Buddies has a number of projects that are specifically related to diabetes, and there are many other STEM projects in the Science Buddies library of more than 1,100 scientist-authored project ideas that can be adapted by students to focus on something related to diabetes. Students with Type 1 Diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, live with constantly changing blood glucose levels, insulin needs, and carbohydrate ratios. People with T1D observe and manipulate a range of variables every day in an effort to keep blood glucose levels within safe ranges. Because T1D requires constant monitoring and attention, a person with T1D may at times feel like he or she is living an ongoing science project! In fact, many of the variables that affect a person with T1D can be turned into an interesting student science project. How does exercise affect blood glucose? How does it affect blood glucose during exercise? An hour after? Three hours after? How might changes in basal rates affect glucose levels during and after exercise? What is the best timing for those kinds of insulin changes? What kinds of foods bef Continue reading >>

Teaching Activities For: Using Art To Tackle Obesity And Diabetes In Youth

Teaching Activities For: Using Art To Tackle Obesity And Diabetes In Youth

The Learning Network |Teaching Activities for: Using Art to Tackle Obesity and Diabetes in Youth Tassiana Willis took part in a program that uses art to confront obesity and diabetes. Credit University of California, San Francisco Watch The Longest Mile , by Tassiana Willis, a young poet from Oakland, Calif. The Bigger Picture: The Longest Mile Video by Youth Speaks What message is Ms. Willis trying to send through this video? What techniques does she use to get her ideas across? In your opinion, is the way she communicates her message effective? Why or why not? Now, read the article, Using Art to Tackle Obesity and Diabetes in Youth , and answer the following questions: 1. What are the goals of The Bigger Picture campaign? 2. How does the program address obesity and diabetes in youth? 3. What do you learn about the causes and impact of obesity and diabetes from Tassiana Williss and Gabriel Cortezs stories? 4. How did Dean Schillinger come to see diabetes, especially Type 2 diabetes in children, as a crisis? Continue reading >>

Physical Activity And Type 1 Diabetes: What School Staff Should Know

Physical Activity And Type 1 Diabetes: What School Staff Should Know

Physical activity and type 1 diabetes: What school staff should know Physical activity and type 1 diabetes: What school staff should know Regular physical activity is important for all children and youth, including those with type 1 diabetes. Students with type 1 diabetes should participate fully in gym classes, and in any team or individual sports that they choose. Another health condition that prevents their full participation. Because physical activity lowers blood sugar, its important to take steps to ensure that students with type 1 diabetes are safe, especially if activity is unplanned or more intense than expected. Just as additional physical activity can lead to low blood sugars without proper planning, the lack of physical activity can lead to high blood sugars. When rainy days keep children indoors, for example, parents often find that blood sugars will be higher than usual. Be familiar with specific instructions related to physical activity in the students Individual Care Plan . Steps to take could include: blood checks (before, during or after activity), or an additional snack. Be alert to signs of low blood sugar , and know what to do to treat it. Ensure that students always have access to their emergency kit , especially their meter and a source of fast-acting sugar (such as juice, glucose tabs, or candy). The students daily diabetes plan (including how much insulin they take and how much food they eat) typically accounts for routine physical activity. Significant changes to the schedule may require adjustments, such as an extra blood check and/or an extra snack. Keep parents informed of upcoming changes to the physical education schedule, or special events involving activity. Not all physical activities have the same effect on blood sugar. When a student Continue reading >>

How To Teach ... Diabetes

How To Teach ... Diabetes

Do you know the difference between the two types of diabetes? Here’s a quick refresher: type 1 is where your body destroys the cells that make insulin, which means that your glucose levels increase, potentially damaging your organs. It can develop at any time, but is often discovered in childhood and requires daily doses of insulin. Type 2, on the other hand, means that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or doesn’t react to it. Symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and monitoring blood glucose levels. It is linked to obesity and usually develops in later life; it also accounts for 90% of all UK cases. The disease is at once complex, common (it affects 4 million people in the UK) and scary – prevalence rates are rising and about half of cases are thought to be undiagnosed. So how can you discuss it with your students? Primary This video, from Diabetes UK, uses simple, child-friendly language to explain what type 1 diabetes is and how it affects the body. An extreme zoom takes viewers inside a person with diabetes: there we meet talking cells and flying insulin and glucose, detailing how treatment works and how to handle a diagnosis. The charity has a huge number of resources aimed at children who have diabetes, including guidance sheets about exploring the outdoors safely and taking care in cold weather. Advice includes wearing a diabetes wristband in case of an emergency and keeping a testing kit and snacks to hand. The idea of testing blood and injecting insulin can be intimidating. Give your students a look at a day in the life of a diabetic with this pack from the International Diabetes Federation. It uses a cartoon strip to demystify the process of checking blood sugar levels, as well as offering advice on how to keep active and eat healthily Continue reading >>

Educational Games For Your Classroom Visit

Educational Games For Your Classroom Visit

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Educational Games for Your Classroom Visit When Stacys 7-year-old daughter Jennifer was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two years ago, she was often asked by classmates what diabetes was and whether they could catch it. The kids were confused, and even scared, recalls Stacy. It broke my heart when Jennifer was left out by other children simply because they didnt understand what type 1 was. Jennifers teacher asked Stacy to come into the classroom to educate the other students, but Stacy didnt want to bore them with a long, technical speech. My daughters doctor suggested I play games with the kids to capture their attention and hold their interest, she said. Now I visit her class at the beginning of each new school year to educate the children and answer any questions they might have. It really helps! Like the idea but dont know any games? Shelley Yeager, M.A., L.C.S.W., director of outreach and development at the Diabetes Education & Camping Association, shares a few of her favorites. Materials Needed: Bingo cards (7 x 9 blank poster board with a 5 x 6 grid drawn), pictures of various food items (two per food), index cards and a bag or basket to hold them, Bingo chips Set-Up: Create individual Bingo cards. In place of the letters B-I-N-G-O in the top row, write the food groups Grains, Fruits, Fats, Protein, and Dairy. Randomly glue the pictures of individual food items in the appropriate columns on each card. (Be sure to have more foods than will fit on a single card or everyone will get Bingo at the same time.) Each food item used on the cards is also put on a single index card with the name of the food group it belongs to. Introduction: Explain to the students that different foods belong to different food groups. Discuss why it Continue reading >>

Extracurricular Activities, School Field Trips, And Diabetes Care

Extracurricular Activities, School Field Trips, And Diabetes Care

Extracurricular Activities, School Field Trips, and Diabetes Care All parents plan for transportation, lunches, and supplies during their childs school year, but planning takes on added dimensions when a child has diabetes. Extracurricular activates, and field trips that take students off school grounds especially require careful, creative forethought so that a child with diabetes can fully participate, and be safe. Fortunately, federal laws guarantee that students with a disability, such as diabetes, can participate in all school activities, and get the care they need. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 requires programs receiving federal funding to treat kids with disabilities fairly, and the Americans with Disabilities Act* (ADA) prohibits schools (excluding religious ones) from discriminating against students with a disabling condition. Students with diabetes are considered to have a disability because their endocrine system does not function properlya physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. More specifically, federal disability law ensures that: Students with diabetes can expect the school to provide care at drama, sports, music, art, and other activities both before or after school. This is the schools responsibility, and includes help with monitoring, insulin administration, access to diabetes supplies, and having someone on site trained to use emergency glucagon. Students with diabetes must be included in all activities including class or field trips, sports, drama, band, student council, school dances, recreational events, or carnivals. If an event or class trip requires an overnight stay, the school is responsible for providing necessary care. The students parents cannot be required to chaperone day events, Continue reading >>

Kids With Diabetes & Their Rights In School

Kids With Diabetes & Their Rights In School

Diabetes & You > Know Your Rights > Kids with Diabetes & Their Rights in School Kids with Diabetes & Their Rights in School What is Diabetes Canadas position on kids with diabetes in school? Students living with diabetes have the right to be full and equal participants in school and all school-related activities without the fear of being excluded, stigmatized, or discriminated against. School boards should develop and communicate a comprehensive diabetes management policy that includes the roles and responsibilities of the students living with diabetes, their parents/caregivers and school personnel according to Diabetes Canadas Standards of Care for Students with Diabetes in School. School principals should work with each student living with diabetes, their parents/caregivers and healthcare professionals to develop and communicate to school personnel and Individual Care Plan (ICP) that complies with the students prescribed diabetes management regimen. Each ICP should be comprised of a daily management plan and a diabetes emergency plan. Schools should permit students living with diabetes to monitor their blood glucose (sugar), administer insulin and treat low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) and high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) conveniently and safely wherever and whenever required. School personnel should be trained to recognize emergency situations and to respond appropriately according to the students individual care plan (ICP). School personnel should be trained to administer glucagon in the event of a severe hypoglycemic reaction. What resources does Diabetes Canada have related to the health and safety of kids with diabetes in school? Guidelines for the Care for Students Living with Diabetes at School These are Diabetes Canada guidelines addressing the roles and re Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Mellitus (type 1 And Type 2)

​​​Purpose of this policy To ensure that schools support students with diabetes, and to provide advice for schools as they develop and implement support and management plans for students living with diabetes mellitus (‘diabetes’). Note: This material is of a general nature and may not be directly applicable to every student’s individual health needs. Prerequisite policy See: Health Care Needs Policy Upon enrolment or when a health care need is identified, schools in conjunction with parents/carers and treating medical team are required to develop a clear and tailored health management plan to support the student’s individual health care needs. Schools have a legal obligation to consult with the student and parents/carers about the needs of the student and what reasonable adjustments must be made. Schools should consult initially with parents/carers and on an ongoing basis through regular Student Support Groups. All schools are required to ensure that students with Type 1 diabetes have: a current individual Diabetes Management Plan prepared by the student’s treating medical team (provided by parents/carers) a current Diabetes Action Plan prepared by the student’s treating medical team (provided by parents/carers); and a Student Health Support Plan, developed by the school in consultation with the parents/carers and where appropriate the student’s treating medical team, see: Health Support Planning Forms. These documents must be completed in line with requirements as listed under Diabetes Management Plan below. Principals must also ensure that the Department’s policy requirements and advice is met. The following lists a range of advice provided below: Legislative and Medical Context Children and young people with diabetes are no more likely to be sic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lesson Plan

Diabetes Lesson Plan

Watch short & fun videos Start Your Free Trial Today Josh has taught Earth Science and Physical Science at the High School level and holds a Master of Education degree from UNC-Chapel Hill. Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course. Custom Courses are courses that you create from Study.com lessons. Use them just like other courses to track progress, access quizzes and exams, and share content. Organize and share selected lessons with your class. Make planning easier by creating your own custom course. Create a new course from any lesson page or your dashboard. Click "Add to" located below the video player and follow the prompts to name your course and save your lesson. Click on the "Custom Courses" tab, then click "Create course". Next, go to any lesson page and begin adding lessons. Edit your Custom Course directly from your dashboard. Name your Custom Course and add an optional description or learning objective. Create chapters to group lesson within your course. Remove and reorder chapters and lessons at any time. Share your Custom Course or assign lessons and chapters. Share or assign lessons and chapters by clicking the "Teacher" tab on the lesson or chapter page you want to assign. Students' quiz scores and video views will be trackable in your "Teacher" tab. You can share your Custom Course by copying and pasting the course URL. Only Study.com members will be able to access the entire course. Use this lesson plan to introduce students to diabetes. Students will read a text lesson, create a graphic organizer related to different types of diabetes, and discuss healthy habits for the treatment and prevention of the condition. After this lesson, students will be able to: define diabetes, including Type I, Type II, and Gestational diabetes list and expl Continue reading >>

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is a part of our library of resources for Elementary/Primary School. Read more on test taking, diabetic alert dogs, class presentations and creating a school treatment plan. Being a teacher comes with the responsibility of taking care of 20-30 children on a daily basis. In your career, you may have a student with Type 1 diabetes in your class. Although you may feel overwhelmed about what to expect, there is no need! This guide will make you aware of the conditions of a child with T1D, which will give you a better understanding of how to keep him or her healthy and safe at school. What is Type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. People with Type 1 are insulin-dependent for life, and must manually give themselves insulin through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They must carefully balance insulin, food, exercise, and other factors in order to prevent or minimize serious short and long-term complications due to out of range blood sugar levels. If you have not heard much about Type 1, here are some other fast facts – T1D is not caused by a lack of exercise or eating too much sugar T1D is not contagious There is no cure for T1D at the present moment Although T1D has also been called “juvenile diabetes,” T1D affects both children and adults How can I help? It is important to remember that children with T1D can participate in all of the same activities as other kids, such as play sports and join activities. They can also eat sweets and any other type of food/drink, as long as they are giving themselves the appropriate amount of insulin to cover the meal. Some foods affect blood sugar levels differently than others. Read Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program

Diabetes Prevention Program

A CDC-recognized, structured lifestyle change programdeveloped specifically to prevent type 2 diabetes. It is designed for people who have prediabetes or are at risk for type 2 diabetes, but who do not already have diabetes. A trained lifestyle coach leads the program to help participants change certain aspects of their lifestyle, like eating healthier, reducing stress, and getting more physical activity. The program also includes group support from others who share the participants goals and struggles. This lifestyle change program is not a fad diet or an exercise class. And its not a quick fix. Its a year-long program focused on long-term changes and lasting results. There are sixteen, once weekly meetings followed by bi-monthly to monthly maintenance meetings for the remainder of the year. expose medical students to the challenges faced by patients dealing with the diagnosis of pre-diabetes foster empathy in medical students as they interact with patients who have pre-diabetes learn and utilize skills in Motivational Interviewing and facilitating groups in order for medical students to learn more effective ways to educate patients on chronic illness (pre-diabetes) and how to encourage patient ownership in their own health and healthcare Students attend a 2-3 hour shortened training in order to learn how to co-facilitate DPP Classes. They attend 3 consecutive classes of the 16-once weekly DPP classes; students watch the first one, assist with the second, and facilitate the third class on their own with YVMH facilitator assistance. Continue reading >>

Active-learning Laboratory Session To Teach The Four M's Of Diabetes Care

Active-learning Laboratory Session To Teach The Four M's Of Diabetes Care

Active-Learning Laboratory Session to Teach the Four M's of Diabetes Care School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Purdue University Corresponding Author: Patricia L. Darbishire, PharmD, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Purdue University, 575 Stadium Mall Drive, Heine Pharmacy Building, Room 304A, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Tel: 765-494-1380. Fax: 765-494-0801. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2008 May 29; Accepted 2008 Jul 14. Copyright 2009-American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To implement an active-learning methodology for teaching diabetes care to pharmacy students and evaluate its effectiveness. Laboratory instruction was divided into 4 primary areas of diabetes care, referred to by the mnemonic, the 4 M's: meal planning, motion, medication, and monitoring. Students participated in skill-based learning laboratory stations and in simulated patient experiences. A pretest, retrospective pretest, and posttest were administered to measure improvements in students' knowledge about diabetes and confidence in providing care to diabetes patients. Students knowledge of and confidence in each area assessed improved. Students enjoyed the laboratory session and felt it contributed to their learning. An active-learning approach to teaching diabetes care allowed students to experience aspects of the disease from the patient's perspective. This approach will be incorporated in other content areas. Keywords: diabetes, active-learning techniques, practice laboratory Diabetes affects almost 24 million children and adults, or approximately 8% of the US population. While almost 18 million of those people have been diagnosed, nearly a third remain undiagnosed. 1 - 3 Furthermore, there are 57 million people Continue reading >>

More in diabetes