diabetestalk.net

Dextromethorphan Diabetes

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release An ingredient found in cough medicine may assist in treating diabetes, according to a new study out of the Heinrich Heine University in Dsseldorf, Germany. According to the study , published in the journal Nature Medicine, dextromethorphan, often listed simply as DM on the labels of cold medications, boosted the release of insulin in mice, human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small group of diabetes patients. DM has far fewer side effects than most current type 2 diabetes drugs, which is what prompted the doctors to believe it may be a new potential treatment option. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by very high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which the cells require to live. But people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin (which comes from the pancreas and moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells where its needed). As a result, blood sugar remains high, unable to move to the cells. The authors of the study interestingly did not plan on studying dextromethorphan as a potential treatment for diabetes initially; instead, they fell into it by chance. Inspired by previous research, the authors were originally focusing on a disorder called hyperinsulism, which is essentially the opposite of diabetes in that it involves a person having too much insulin. They hypothesized that dextromethorphan would actually lower and suppress insulin release in patients with hyperinsulinism. But while studying it, they discovered that a certain compound thats released as a byproduct of DM, dextrorphan, actually increased insulin release from a patients pancreas thus making it potentially useful in treating type 2 diabetes. The researchers arent entirely sure how it works Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

The “common cold” may cause some patients with diabetes to worry about elevations in their blood sugar. When you get sick, your body is under a lot of stress. Your body tries to make up for this stress by releasing hormones to fight the sickness. These hormones may cause your blood sugar levels to rise. There is no cure for the common cold; we have to help with symptoms that we are suffering. One of the annoying symptoms is a cough. There are 2 main ingredients over the counter helpful for a cough, yet so many products on the shelf. You will find that they contain one if not both of these medications and may be mixed with pain medication or medicine for congestion. This can be confusing, especially if when worried about raising blood sugar levels. Keep in mind is that suffering from cold symptoms usually is short term barring any complications. It is temporary and soon you will be feeling better. There are two main types of cough- a wet, mucus cough and a dry, hacking cough. They are treated differently. When you want to get rid of the mucus in your lungs (wet cough) this is treated with an expectorant – guaifenesin. A dry cough is treated with a cough suppressant –dextromethorphan. Guaifenesin is an expectorant that helps break up and clear mucus in your lungs. It is available in tablet and liquid form. The tablets, available 600 mg or higher, are more potent, and work better than the smaller doses available in a syrup as 100 mg. For a dry cough, the most effective medication is dextromethorphan. This is available in a syrup, tablet or capsule form. This medication will work in your brain’s cough center to make you less likely to cough. Although the medication is available as a syrup you only need to take 2-4 teaspoons full per day. The likelihood of this sma Continue reading >>

Active Ingredient Dextromethorphan May Help People With Type 2 Diabetes

Active Ingredient Dextromethorphan May Help People With Type 2 Diabetes

Active ingredient dextromethorphan may help people with Type 2 diabetes The active ingredient dextromethorphan, which is contained in many over-the-counter cough remedies, has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus). That was the finding of a recent international study, in which the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology of MedUni Vienna played a significant part and which has now been published in the leading medical journal "Nature Medicine". Using electrophysiological methods to measure electrical currents through cell membranes, the research group at the Institute for Physiology and Pharmacology, led by Marjan Slak Rupnik, showed that dextromethorphan extends the periods of electrical activity in beta cells. It is precisely during these periods, so-called bursts, that the cells secrete insulin. Reconciliation of diabetes medications associated with fewer subsequent hospitalizations The scientists demonstrated that, via so-called NMDA receptors, the active ingredient stimulated the pancreatic beta cells to secrete more insulin at raised blood sugar levels. This brought about an improvement in blood sugar, whilst at the same time reducing so-called sugar spikes, that is phases with particularly high blood glucose concentrations. Slak Rupnik: "Our studies also indicate that the tested cough suppressant protects the beta cells from cell death, which would also be very beneficial for type 1 diabetics." Their diabetes worsens appreciably over the course of the illness so that - despite an improvement in blood sugar levels directly after the start of insulin therapy - they have a constantly high insulin requirement. This is thought to be due to the beta cells dying off or at least gradually producing less insulin, amongst other thin Continue reading >>

Cough Suppressant Improves Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetes Mellitus

Cough Suppressant Improves Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetes Mellitus

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Cough suppressant improves blood sugar levels in diabetes mellitus The active ingredient dextromethorphan, which is contained in many over-the-counter cough remedies, has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus), a study concludes. The active ingredient dextromethorphan, which is contained in many over-the-counter cough remedies, has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus). That was the finding of a recent international study, in which the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology of MedUni Vienna played a significant part and which has now been published in the leading medical journal "Nature Medicine." Using electrophysiological methods to measure electrical currents through cell membranes, the research group at the Institute for Physiology and Pharmacology, led by Marjan Slak Rupnik, showed that dextromethorphan extends the periods of electrical activity in beta cells. It is precisely during these periods, so-called bursts, that the cells secrete insulin. The scientists demonstrated that, via so-called NMDA receptors, the active ingredient stimulated the pancreatic beta cells to secrete more insulin at raised blood sugar levels. This brought about an improvement in blood sugar, whilst at the same time reducing so-called sugar spikes, that is phases with particularly high blood glucose concentrations. Slak Rupnik: "Our studies also indicate that the tested cough suppressant protects the beta cells from cell death, which would also be very beneficial for type 1 diabetics." Their diabetes worsens appreciably over the course of the illness so that -- despite an improvement in blood sugar levels directly after the start Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine Ingredient Investigated As Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Cough Medicine Ingredient Investigated As Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Cough medicine ingredient investigated as type 2 diabetes treatment An ingredient found in over-the-counter cough medicine - dextromethorphan - could lead to a new treatment for type 2 diabetes . The effects of dextromethorphan were noted by German researchers at Heinrich Heine University, who observed it increased insulin release in mice. Dextromethorphan suppresses a cough by stifling N-Methl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors - a protein found in nerve cells and located in the medulla oblongata, which controls autonomic functions such as breathing. NDMA receptors are also located in the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas . Researchers therefore conducted a human study involving 20 participants to assess the effects of dextromethorphan. While serum insulin concentrations were found to increase, and glucose levels were lowered, researchers have urged caution over their findings. "To date, we only have results from a single-dose clinical trial, which make us optimistic; but [this is] not sufficient to evaluate the clinical benefit of this drug for the long-term treatment of people with diabetes," senior author Eckhard Lammert told Live Science. Patients with type 2 diabetes are warned by researchers not to start self-medicating with cough medicine containing dextromethorphan. Moreover, when exceeding maximum dosages, dextromethorphan acts as a dissociative hallucinogen. The researchers hope this research will lead to further clinical trials to investigate whether dextromethorphan could be used to treat type 2 diabetes , which is characterised by the pancreas not making enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels . The results of this study appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Trial Shows Cough Medicine Ingredient Could Help Treat Diabetes

Trial Shows Cough Medicine Ingredient Could Help Treat Diabetes

Trial Shows Cough Medicine Ingredient Could Help Treat Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is an incurable condition affecting around 350 million individuals worldwide, and its on the rise. It can result in all sorts of serious long-term health issues, such as blindness, kidney failure and an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease or stroke. Although treatments exist, many have undesirable side effects , such as weight gain and liver damage. But encouragingly, scientists may have just accidentally stumbled upon a new effective agent against the disease, and we wont have to wait years to find out whether it is safe or causes lots of side effects since it is already widely used in many over-the-counter medicines. The candidate drug is called dextromethorphan, which is a common active ingredient in various cough remedies. Researchers found that this compound boosted the release of insulin by pancreatic cells in tissue culture studies, animal tests and even diabetic humans enrolled into a small trial. Although these results are promising, the researchers urge diabetics to not start self-medicating with cough syrup since larger trials are required to determine whether it is indeed an effective treatment. The study has been published in Nature Medicine . Type 2 diabetes is a progressive metabolic disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar, or glucose, levels. This is a result of the body not producing enough insulin or cells failing to react properly to it, which is known as insulin resistance. Glucose is a major energy source for our cells and it is the job of insulin to shuttle it from the blood into muscle and fat cells for storage. Although the exact cause of diabetes is unknown, scientists suspected that a particular type of receptor, called an NMDA recepto Continue reading >>

Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, And Diphenhydramine (diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula)

Acetaminophen, Dextromethorphan, And Diphenhydramine (diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula)

acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and diphenhydramine (Diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula) Brand Names: Diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula Generic Name: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and diphenhydramine (Pronunciation: a SEET a MIN oh fen, DEX troe me THOR fan, DYE fen HYE dra meen) What is acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and diphenhydramine (Diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula)? Acetaminophen is a pain reliever and fever reducer. Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant. It affects the cough reflex in the brain that triggers coughing. Acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and dextromethorphan is a combination medicine used to treat headache , fever, body aches, cough, runny nose, sneezing, and sore throat caused by allergies, the common cold, or the flu. This medicine will not treat a cough that is caused by smoking , asthma , or emphysema . Acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and dextromethorphan may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of this medicine (Diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using the medicine and call your doctor at once if you have: This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about this medicine (Diabetic Tussin Night Time Formula)? Ask a doctor before taking medicine t Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Diabetic Tussin Dm Max Str Oral And Dextromethorphan-fluoxetine-paroxetine

Interactions Between Diabetic Tussin Dm Max Str Oral And Dextromethorphan-fluoxetine-paroxetine

Drugs & Medications Diabetic Tussin DM Max Str Capsule Dextromethorphan/Fluoxetine; Paroxetine Interactions This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment. Moderate. These medicines may cause some risk when taken together. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information. Your antidepressant may cause your body to process dextromethorphan more slowly. In addition, both medicines can increase the level of serotonin in your body. You could have worsening of usual side effects such as dizziness, headache, or nausea.High serotonin levels may cause changes in body temperature, blood pressure, muscle movements and mood, leading to a medical condition called Serotonin Syndrome. Serotonin Syndrome may be very serious or rarely life threatening. What you should do about this interaction: Make sure your healthcare professional (e.g.doctor or pharmacist) know that you are taking these medicines together. Do not take more than the recommended amount of dextromethorphan.If you experience muscle twitching, tremors, shivering or stiffness, fever, heavy sweating, heart palpitations, restlessness, confusion, agitation, trouble with coordination, or severe diarrhea contact your doctor right away.Your healthcare professionals may already be aware of this interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. 1.Schoedel KA, Pope LE, Sellers EM. Randomized open-label drug-drug interaction trial of dextromethorphan/quinidine and paroxetine in healthy volunteers. Clin Drug Investig 2012 Mar 1;32(3):157-69. 2.Paxil (paroxetine hydroch Continue reading >>

Effects Of Dextromethorphan As Addon To Sitagliptin On Blood Glucose And Serum Insulin Concentrations In Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebocontrolled, Doubleblinded, Multiple Crossover, Singledose Clinical Trial

Effects Of Dextromethorphan As Addon To Sitagliptin On Blood Glucose And Serum Insulin Concentrations In Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebocontrolled, Doubleblinded, Multiple Crossover, Singledose Clinical Trial

Effects of dextromethorphan as addon to sitagliptin on blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, placebocontrolled, doubleblinded, multiple crossover, singledose clinical trial 1Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Department of Biology, Heinrich Heine University, Dsseldorf, Germany 2Department of General Pediatrics, Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology, University Children's Hospital Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 1Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Department of Biology, Heinrich Heine University, Dsseldorf, Germany 2Department of General Pediatrics, Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology, University Children's Hospital Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 4Institute for Beta Cell Biology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Dsseldorf, Germany 5German Centre for Diabetes Research, Partner Institution Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 1Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Department of Biology, Heinrich Heine University, Dsseldorf, Germany 4Institute for Beta Cell Biology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Dsseldorf, Germany 5German Centre for Diabetes Research, Partner Institution Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 1Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Department of Biology, Heinrich Heine University, Dsseldorf, Germany 4Institute for Beta Cell Biology, German Diabetes Centre, Leibniz Centre for Diabetes Research, Dsseldorf, Germany 5German Centre for Diabetes Research, Partner Institution Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 1Institute of Metabolic Physiology, Department of Biology, Heinrich Heine University, Dsseldorf, Germany 2Department of General Pediatrics, Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology, University Children's Hospital Dsseldorf, Dsseldorf, Germany 4Institute for Beta C Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine Ingredient May Aid Diabetes Fight

Cough Medicine Ingredient May Aid Diabetes Fight

MORE An ingredient in many over-the-counter cough suppressants seems to improve the release of insulin in humans, a discovery that may lead to new treatments for Type 2 diabetes. Doctors at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany, found that the drug dextromethorphan increased the release of insulin from the pancreas in a series of studies conducted first in mice, then in human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small sample of people with diabetes. Dextromethorphan, often indicated by the letters DM on the labels of cold medications, has few serious side effects, particularly in comparison to the current arsenal of drugs used to treat people with Type 2 diabetes, the researchers noted. The results appear today (March 16) in the journal Nature Medicine. Type 2 diabetes affects about 350 million people globally, according to the World Health Organization. The disease is characterized by elevated levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which cells use for fuel. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, ferries glucose out of the blood and into the cells. But in people with Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin, or cells no longer respond properly to the hormone. The authors of the new study said they stumbled upon the effects of dextromethorphan on diabetes by mistake. Based on the work that other researchers did a decade ago, they thought that dextromethorphan would suppress insulin secretion in patients with a condition called hyperinsulinism, which involves having too much insulin in the blood stream, somewhat opposite of diabetes. [7 Bizarre Drug Side Effects] Instead, they found that dextromethorphan — or, more specifically, a compound called dextrorphan, which is a byproduct that forms in the body when someone takes dex Continue reading >>

Dextromethorphan And Sitagliptin For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Dextromethorphan And Sitagliptin For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

This study aimed to determine the effect ofsitagliptinanddextromethorphanon blood glucose levels. Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) initially produce insulin (hormone which lowers blood glucose levels). However, insulin fails to work in the body. Drugs such asmetformin (Glucophage)aim to help insulin work in the body. Over time thepancreas reduces insulin production. Treatments such as sitagliptin(Januvia) increase the release of insulin from the pancreas. Dextromethorphanis the main ingredient in cough-suppressing medications (such as Robitussin). This medication has been shown to increase insulin production and decreased the variability of blood glucose levels in patients with T2D. Dextromethorphanandsitagliptinmay improve blood glucose levels compared tositagliptintreatment alone. This study aimed to compare the effects of dextromethorphan and sitagliptin combnination treatment to sitagliptin single treatment. This study involved 20 men with T2D. Participants were divided into various groups. Participants in three groups received 30, 60 or 90 mg of sitagliptin. Another group received 100 mg dextromethorphan. Other participants received 30, 60 or 90 mg sitagliptin in combination with 100 mg dextromethorphan. An additional group of participants received a placebo (substance with no therapeutic effect). Blood glucose levels were measured 30 minutes after glucose was ingested by each participant. Blood glucose levels were lowest in participants treated with 60 mg sitagliptin and 100 mg dextromethorphan (240 mg/dl).Glucose levels in participants treated with sitagliptinwere an average of 254 mg/dl. Participants treated with the placebo had an average blood glucose level of 272 mg/dl. Insulin production was higher following combination treatment. Patients did not experi Continue reading >>

Scot-tussin Diabetic

Scot-tussin Diabetic

Scot-Tussin Diabetic is a cough suppressant. It affects the signals in the brain that trigger cough reflex. Scot-Tussin Diabetic is used to treat a cough. Scot-Tussin Diabetic will not treat a cough that is caused by smoking , asthma , or emphysema . Scot-Tussin Diabetic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Over the Counter Cold Remedies - Which One is Right For You? Always ask a doctor before giving a cough or cold medicine to a child. Death can occur from the misuse of cough and cold medicines in very young children. Do not use Scot-Tussin Diabetic if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid , linezolid , methylene blue injection, phenelzine , rasagiline , selegiline , or tranylcypromine . Do not use Scot-Tussin Diabetic if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others. Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using this medicine if you have emphysema or chronic bronchitis . It is not known whether Scot-Tussin Diabetic will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant. This medication may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are breast-feeding a baby. Artificially sweetened liquid medicine may contain phenylalanine. Check the medication label if you have phenylketonuria (PKU). There are many brands and forms of Scot-Tussin Diabetic available. Not all brands are listed on this leaflet. Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

More in diabetes