diabetestalk.net

Dexcom Glucometer

How Is Dexcom Cgm Different From A Blood Glucose Meter?

How Is Dexcom Cgm Different From A Blood Glucose Meter?

The traditional method of measuring glucose levels requires a fingerstick using a blood glucose meter (BGM). BGMs provide a glucose reading at a single point in time. The key difference between Dexcom CGM and BGM is that Dexcom CGM provides glucose readings throughout the day and night, including glucose speed and direction arrows that empower wearers with more information for more informed decision making*. Finally, Dexcom CGM is designed with alerts to warn the wearer of glucose highs and lows during critical times like playing, sleeping or exercising to help wearers catch high and lows before they become critical. Here is an example of how Dexcom CGM information could impact glucose management decisions: BLOOD GLUCOSE METER (BGM) READING: 105 CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITOR (CGM) READING: 102 (The double arrows signal a rapid decline in glucose) Based on the blood glucose meter (BGM) reading of 105, this person is likely to decide that no action is required. But, with a similar glucose level reading on the Dexcom CGM and two arrows facing down, the patient might decide to eat some carbohydrates to avoid having a hypoglycemic event. *Fingerstick required prior to making treatment decisions Continue reading >>

Dexcom Ceo Talks ‘game Changer’ Diabetes Management Coming To Apple Watch

Dexcom Ceo Talks ‘game Changer’ Diabetes Management Coming To Apple Watch

With the upcoming watchOS 4 update for Apple Watch slated to bring new features for diabetes management devices, we took some time to speak with Dexcom’s CEO Kevin Sayer this week about what it means for users. When Apple revealed watchOS 4 at its Worldwide Developers Conference this month, it featured Dexcom, makers of the G5 Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) popular among iPhone users, on stage as an example of an Apple Watch app that will benefit from new features in the release. Sayer shared details on how exactly Dexcom devices will improve from these new features in watchOS 4, and more specifically why CoreBluetooth support will be a “game changer” for Apple Watch users with diabetes. We also learned from Sayer about the next-generation of the company’s popular G5 CGM coming soon. And we had to ask about the chatter prior to WWDC that Apple is reportedly developing its own glucose monitoring technology, to find out his thoughts on the possibility of such features being built directly into future Apple Watch models. Dexcom’s G5 CGM already works with both the iPhone and Apple Watch, but currently the G5’s signal has to go to the iPhone first before syncing data to Apple Watch. That means the data on Apple Watch is a bit delayed, and it also means you must have your iPhone around if you’re on the go and want to continue syncing data. With new support for CoreBluetooth in watchOS 4, the G5 CGM will make a direct connection: The way we architected our transmitter to transmit this glucose data many years ago is there is two Bluetooth channels…so it could communicate with two devices at the same time… because our sensor talks to Android phones as well, it also speaks with certain models of insulin pumps … an Apple patient now with this Watch direct co Continue reading >>

Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucometer Doesnt Require Finger Pricks

Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucometer Doesnt Require Finger Pricks

Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucometer Doesnt Require Finger Pricks Dexcom landed FDA clearance under the de novo classification process for its Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor, which can be used as a standalone monitor or as a part of an automated insulin delivery system. The neatest feature of the Dexcom G6 is that the sensor doesnt require calibration and so pricking the finger can be a thing of the past nearly completely, save for visits to the doctors office. Once applied to the skin, the small sensor patch can stay on for up to ten days through sleep, showers, and most other normal activities, transmitting its readings to a smartphone, smartwatch, or its own unique receiver. The placement of the sensor is done using a new applicator that has only one button to press and that should be easy for just about anyone to work with. Of note, the system is intended for adults and children as young as two years of age. An interesting capability of the Dexcom G6 is how it can avoid being confused by the presence of acetaminophen in the blood, which can wildly throw off the readings. It is also able to predict hypoglycemic events, warning the wearer in advance to put something sweet in the mouth. The FDA authorization comes with a few caveats, according to Dexcom, which involve establishing criteria, called special controls, which outline requirements for assuring CGM accuracy, reliability and clinical relevance as well as describe the type of studies and data required to demonstrate acceptable CGM performance. Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Timely knowing glucose level helps diabetic patients to manage the disease, including decisions about food, physical activity and medication. This study compared two continuous glucose monitoring systems in conscious and moving-free nonhuman primates (NHPs, Macaca fascicularis). Each normoglycemic or diabetic monkey was implanted with one Dexcom G4 Platinum subcutaneously or one HD-XG glucose sensor arterially for glucose monitoring. The glucose levels measured by both telemetry devices significantly correlated with the glucometer readings. The data of oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) showed that the glucose levels measured by either Dexcom G4 Platinum or HD-XG transmitter were very similar to glucometer readings. However, compared to HD-XG transmitter or glucometer, Dexcom G4 Platinum detected a decreased glucose peak of ivGTT with approximately 10 min delay due to interstitial glucose far behind blood glucose change. Our data showed the advantages of the telemetry systems are: (1) consecutive data collection (day and night); (2) no bleeding; (3) no anesthesia (moving freely); (4) recording natural response without physical restriction and stress; (5) less labor intensity during ivGTT and other tests; (6) quick outcomes without lab tests. This article summarized and compared the differences of the general characteristics of two continuous glucose monitoring systems in diabetic research. Dysfunctional carbohydrate metabolism without treatment eventually leads to diabetes which significantly impacts on the quality of patient life. Potential new therapies and technologies may help to improve the quality of life beyond current standard of care and perhaps even to cure the disease in future1, 2. Various animal models have been used in research for understanding the diseas Continue reading >>

Dexcom G6 Review: A Cgm That Doesn't Require Finger Pricks

Dexcom G6 Review: A Cgm That Doesn't Require Finger Pricks

This diabetes monitor can read your blood sugar without any blood I have Type 1 diabetes, which means my body doesn't produce any insulin. So I have to inject insulin to regulate my blood sugar and check my levels by using a glucometer. This means I have to stick my finger with a needle anywhere from 5 to 10 times a day. Dexcom provided me with a review unit of its new G6 continuous glucose monitor that's approved by the FDA to require no blood at all. CGMs allow diabetics to see their blood sugar throughout the day and night with a sensor that is inserted under the skin. Previously, CGMs needed a blood glucose reading in order to calibrate the device. The new Dexcom G6 comes factory-calibrated and requires no finger stick. I've been wearing the device for nine days and I am really impressed with it. CNBC's Erin Black inserts the Dexcom G6 sensor The G6 comes with a new auto-applicator that allows one-button insertion. And wow, was it smooth. I didn't feel a thing. Side-by-side comparison of Dexcom G5 and G6 applicators This is a huge improvement from Dexcom G5 inserter that required you to push the needle under the skin yourself. It's definitely the most painless thing I've had to put in my body in the 20 years of using syringes, insulin pens and pumps. The insertion device itself is big. And I did feel bad about throwing it away after its one-time use. But because the device is so accurate, I don't need to check my blood sugar as much, which means I've been using fewer glucose strips in my meter. So I feel it will even out in the end. The sensor took a few days to become accurate After the sensor warmed up, it was off by 25 mg. After the sensor finished its two-hour warm up, I double-checked the reading it gave me with my glucometer. It was 25 points off. Now I did j Continue reading >>

Fitbit Is Teaming Up With Dexcom For Glucose Monitoring On The Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Is Teaming Up With Dexcom For Glucose Monitoring On The Ionic Smartwatch

Wearable fitness makers are increasingly interested in tracking our vitals. Now Fitbit has announced a collaboration with glucose monitor company Dexcom to develop and market products to help those with diabetes better manage the disease, starting with Fitbit’s Ionic Smartwatch. Starting in 2018, the Fitbit Ionic will show users data from the Dexcom G5 Mobile sensor, which is worn just under the skin and can show vitals every 5 minutes. This means you will have to insert the $900 sensor first. The Dexcom sensor is also supported by the Apple Watch, via a reroute through the iPhone but will soon be on the Watch itself through core Bluetooth, which is coming in watchOS4. Tracking using Fitbit and Apple Watch is still rather difficult if you can’t afford Dexcom’s monitoring device. However, for those with the device already implanted it could prove useful. More than 422 million people around the world have diabetes, a fraction of whom are presumed to be using a wearable for tracking their blood glucose levels. “The collaboration between Dexcom and Fitbit is an important step in providing useful information to people with diabetes that is both convenient and discreet,” said Dexcom CEO Kevin Saye in a statement. “We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that experience available to users of both Android and iOS devices, will have a positive impact on the way people manage their diabetes.” Featured Image: lya S. Savenok / Stringer/Getty Images Continue reading >>

Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring Worth It?

Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring Worth It?

Continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS) may not make life with diabetes any easier. But they can definitely improve health, if you can deal with the hassle and expense. So how do you know if such a system is right for you? As many readers already know, CGMS give a nearly continuous readout of glucose levels in tissue fluid, the wet stuff that oozes out when you have a scrape or a burn. To read these levels, you insert a long-lasting sensor under your skin, a process that feels similar to a needle stick. The sensor is made of material like the filters used in dialysis. It measures glucose levels and radios the results, via a connected transmitting device, to a small receiving device about the size of a pager. This sounds nice — much more information without all the needle sticks. Unfortunately, you still have to do fingertip blood checks 2–4 times a day to keep the monitor calibrated. And the information you get from the meter is only valuable if you know how to use it. Originally, CGMS was for your doctor. You got a continuous 72-hour readout of blood sugar levels, with a nice graph to go with it. If you conscientiously wrote down what you ate, your exercise, and medicines, your doctor would learn a lot about your body’s use of food and insulin. The doc could adjust insulin dosages and other aspects of your care. Then you gave the monitor back. Studies showed this treatment reduced A1C levels by 0.4% to 1.0% or so. Many people with diabetes wanted this capability for themselves, so they could regularly adjust their own treatment and self-management. Now thousands of people use CGMS continuously. But how well do they work? Advantages According to manufacturers’ data, “You can easily and discreetlyview your current glucose values continuously throughout the Continue reading >>

Dexcom

Dexcom

Dexcom, Inc. is a company that develops, manufactures and distributes continuous glucose monitoring systems for diabetes management. It operates internationally with headquarters in San Diego, California, United States. History[edit] DexCom's roots stem from 1967 research on implanted glucose sensors at the University of Wisconsin, and started with a focus on creating an implantable sensor that the body would not reject and that would perform for a long period of time.[1] With over 40 patents,[2] Dexcom’s Sensor technology is based on this research. Dexcom's history includes multiple generations of sensor technology coupled with partner development agreements. In 2006, Dexcom received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and launched the Dexcom STS Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. This was a three-day sensor that provided up to 288 glucose measurements every 24 hours. Dexcom received approval of the second generation product, the Seven Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in May 2007. This device improved on accuracy as well as extending usage from three to seven days of continuous wear. In 2008, Dexcom announced two consumer development agreements with Insulet Corporation[3] and Animas Corporation[4] as well as a development agreement with Edwards Lifesciences for a continuous glucose monitor in the intensive care unit hospital environment.[5] During February 2009, Dexcom received approval for the SEVEN PLUS Continuous Glucose Monitor, the third generation Dexcom continuous glucose monitoring system from the FDA. This product received a CE mark in November 2009. In 2013, development to integrate with Insulet broke up. Dexcom entered a non-exclusive agreement with Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc. in 2015 to allow the integration of next generation G5 and G6 Continue reading >>

Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm) System | Zero Fingersticks

Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitoring (cgm) System | Zero Fingersticks

Simple auto-applicator - a one-touch applicator|| easily inserts a small sensor just beneath the skin. Sensor and transmitter - a slim sensor continuously measures glucose levels just beneath the skin and sends data wirelessly to a display device through a transmitter. Display device - a small touch screen receiver or compatible smart device displays real-time glucose data. Dexcom is committed to helping patients have a positive CGM experience and better diabetes management. From help getting started, to tutorials and FAQ, Dexcom can provide support and guidance for a better experience with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Are you new to the Dexcom G6 CGM System? Or CGM in general? Our Dexcom CARE team can help you get started. The Dexcom G6 is covered by most insurance plans. Getting started is simple, just provide a few details and we'll contact you to begin your order. *If your glucose alerts and readings from the G6 do not match symptoms or expectations or youre taking over the recommended maximum dosage amount of 1000mg of acetaminophen every 6 hours, use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. For a list of compatible devices, visit www.dexcom.com/compatibility. The Dexcom G6 Sensor and Transmitter are water-resistant and may be submerged under eight feet of water for up to 24 hours without failure when properly installed. ** G6 readings can be used to make diabetes treatment decisions when taking up to a maximum acetaminophen dose of 1,000mg every 6 hours. Taking a higher dose may affect the G6 readings. Failure to use the Dexcom G6 Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (G6) and its components according to the instructions for use provided with your device and available at and to properly consider all indications, contraindications, warnin Continue reading >>

Dexcom Warriors | Meet Dexcom Heroes And Read Their Stories! | Dexcom Reviews

Dexcom Warriors | Meet Dexcom Heroes And Read Their Stories! | Dexcom Reviews

* Click here for a list of compatible devices The Dexcom G6 has been FDA permitted to use between the altitues of -1,300 & 13,800 feet The Dexcom G6 sensor and transmitter are water resistant and may be submerged under eight feet of water for up to 24 hours without failure when properly installed Unlike fingersticks that show your childs glucose at one point in time, CGM shows where their glucose is heading and how fast its getting there with readings every five minutes.* The Dexcom G6 is factory calibrated and does not require fingersticks for diabetes treatment decisions. The Dexcom CGM System has allowed my daughter to have a lot more freedom. With the Share feature, she can play outside or at a friends house, and we can monitor her glucose levels from our home. At night, we used to be up every hour testing our kids blood glucose levels. Now, we use the Dexcom CGM System to monitor our children and alert us when there are highs or lows. Keeping Track of Your Child's Glucose has Never Been Easier As a parent you can simply monitor and track your childs glucose levels continuously and conveniently from your compatible smart device. With built- in Share, up to 5 people can follow your child's glucose levels, giving them the circle of support they need.* By downloading the Dexcom Follow App, followers can view your child's glucose data directly from their smart device, whether they live down the street or across the country. I personally dont think children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes should leave the hospital without a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. *Do not make treatment decisions based upon Share and Follow readings. Always confirm with your compatible smart device or receiver. Internet connectivity required to access Dexcom Follow. If your glucose alerts a Continue reading >>

The T:slim X2 Pump Is Up To 38% Smaller Than Other Pumps,1 But Is Packed With Big Features.

The T:slim X2 Pump Is Up To 38% Smaller Than Other Pumps,1 But Is Packed With Big Features.

*A prescription and additional training may be required to access certain future software updates. Offer only available to customers in the United States. 38% smaller than MiniMed 630G and 670G and at least 28% smaller than MiniMed 530G, Animas Vibe and Omnipod System. Data on file, Tandem Diabetes Care. Additional feature updates are not currently available for the t:slim X2 Pump with Dexcom G5 CGM integration and are subject to future FDA approvals. Charges may apply. Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM sold separately. CGM coverage may vary based on insurance. Please consult your CGM supplier for coverage information. Tested to a depth of 3 feet for 30 minutes (IPX7). CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration; may result in hypoglycemia if calibration not performed, when taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings. The Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM transmitter can only be paired with one medical device (either a Dexcom receiver or t:slim X2 Pump) and one consumer device (phone or tablet) at the same time. dQ&A USA Diabetes Connections Surveys, 2009-2017. Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM User Guide, 2017. Following your shared data requires the Dexcom Follow app. dQ&A USA Diabetes Connections Surveys, 2013-2017. Indications for Use: RX ONLY. The t:slim X2 Insulin Delivery System is intended for the subcutaneous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus in persons requiring insulin for individuals 6 years of age or greater. The t:slim X2 Insulin Pump can be used solely for continuous insulin delivery and/or as part of the t:slim X2 System to receive and display continuous glucose measurements from the Dexcom G5 Mobile Sensor and Transmitter. The t:slim X2 System also includes continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

Diabetes Technology: Dexcom G5 Cgm Review - So Much Wasted Potential

As you may know, I'm a Type 1 Diabetic and have been for well over 20 years. I wear a Medtronic Insulin Pump 24 hours a day and use a Dexcom CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) to monitor my blood sugar, also 24 hours a day. This post won't explain how diabetes works to you, so check these posts out (or this video) first if you're not familiar. Moving from a Dexcom G4 to a Dexcom G5 A CGM (Continuous Glucose Meter) doesn't keep you from pricking your fingers. You'll still do finger sticks in order to calibrate a CGM, at least twice a day. The Dexcom G4 "with Share" worked like this. There was a small transmitter that is attached to me, and it talks a proprietary RF wireless format to a Receiver and then the Receiver talks Bluetooth LE to your iPhone, like this picture below. Once the sugar number got to my iPhone it's then optionally uploaded to the Dexcom Share Cloud. My wife can install the Dexcom Follow application on her iPhone and see my sugar on her phone. She also gets the same notifications and warnings I get. When you "upgrade" to the G5 from the G4, you'll likely do what I did. I called Dexcom support to see if I was eligible. They had a US$199 upgrade fee which I paid, and the G5 transmitter showed up a week later. I then called them back to get an "upgrade code" which was a 12 digit unique number (GUID) that I had to enter into their Dexcom Studio application on my Windows machine. I plugged in my Dexcom G4 with Share Receiver to my Windows machine using Microsoft USB and ran the upgrader. I needed that upgrade key. Then about 20 minutes later the G4 receiver (remember it talked RF to the G4 transmitter) is now a G5 and only speaks Bluetooth directly to the Bluetooth-enabled G5 transmitter. That means it works like this now: The G5 software that runs on the iPhon Continue reading >>

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Review

Dexcom has been the leader in the continuous glucose monitoring market for many years. They always seem to be ahead of the game in terms of technology, and the newest addition to the Dexcom family is just that and more. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. Their recent release of their G5 system provides users with a variety of features to help make managing your diabetes care much more simple. G5 is the same system as their previous G4 GGM system but it no longer requires a receiver. The transmitter works over a Bluetooth signal which can be picked up by a smartphone with an installed Dexcom application. The phone now acts as the receiver to display all information and alarms. Controlling Type 2 Diabetes Through Diet Experts Panel Not a lot has changed in terms of the G4 and G5, the sensors are the same, calibrations are still required a minimum of two times a day. The accuracy is still the same as the G4, as well as the trend display settings. So what is the benefit of the G5 over the G4 system? Lets discuss: To understand what the G5 system really is you first need to understand that it features four different components to it. CGM Sensor: The CGM sensor for the G5 system is the same as the G4 Platinum sensor. It is inserted into the skin for up to 7 days. The sensor still requires that you check your blood sugar two times a day to calibrate the system. I can attest that weve checked a little more with my youngest who is currently wearing the G5 system. This has helped to improve the overall accuracy of the sensor even more. G5 Transmitter: The G5 transmitte Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 For Use Without A Fingerstick Glucometer

Fda Approves Dexcom G5 For Use Without A Fingerstick Glucometer

The FDA has officially cleared the Dexcom G5 continuous glucose monitor to inform treatment decisions -- without the use of a fingerstick glucometer, other than for calibration. The G5 has been cleared for a while to complement a traditional glucometer, but this non-adjunctive clearance is the first of its kind according to Dexcom and the FDA, which both released statements. "The FDA works hard to help ensure that novel technologies, which can reduce the burden of daily disease management, are safe and accurate," Alberto Gutierrez, director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement. "Although this system still requires calibration with two daily fingersticks, it eliminates the need for any additional fingerstick blood glucose testing in order to make treatment decisions. This may allow some patients to manage their disease more comfortably and may encourage them to have routine dialogue with their health care providers about the use of real-time continuous glucose monitoring in diabetes management." The approval wasn't a total surprise. In July, an FDA advisory panel gave the non-adjunctive labeling the green light. The FDA says the decision is based on two clinical studies which included 130 adults and children with diabetes, as young as age 2. “The expanded indication for the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM system is an astounding milestone for people with diabetes and it is a critical step to advancing diabetes technology that will drastically change diabetes management,” Kevin Sayer, Dexcom President and CEO, said in a statement. “Now, people with diabetes who use the Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM system can make daily treatment decisions without having to perform confirmatory finger Continue reading >>

What Is (cgm) Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

What Is (cgm) Continuous Glucose Monitoring?

A CGM is an FDA-approved device that provides continuous insight into glucose levels throughout the day and night. The device displays information about glucose direction and speed providing users additional information to help with their diabetes management. Studies have shown that CGM systems may help reduce your A1C and reduce your risk for hypoglycemia, whether you are on insulin injections or pump therapy.2 The Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System is FDA-approved to help minimize the guesswork that comes from making decisions based solely on a number from a blood glucose meter reading, for better diabetes management.* Continue reading >>

More in diabetes