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Delsym For Diabetics

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Delsym Dm - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Delsym Dm - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Dextromethorphan belongs to a group of medications called antitussives (cough suppressants). This medication works by suppressing dry, hacking coughs. It is usually used for a short term to control coughing associated with the flu, a cold, or due to inhaled irritants. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or pharmacist or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor or pharmacist. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. What form(s) does this medication come in? Ask your doctor or pharmacist for details. The dose of this medication depends on many factors, including the age and weight of the person taking it, their medical conditions, and the strength of the medication. This medication is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours. Some long-acting forms of this medication are taken every 12 hours. Make sure you read the label and ask your doctor or pharmacist how much and how often you should take it. It is important that this medication be taken exactly as recommended by your doctor or pharmacist, or as indicated on the product label. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosin Continue reading >>

Faqs

Faqs

13. Where can I obtain ingredient information and MSDS information? 1. What's the difference between a productive and non-productive cough? A non-productive cough is a dry, hacking cough that is often caused by the minor throat and bronchial irritation that accompanies the common cold or from inhaling irritants in the air. A productive cough brings up phlegm/mucus and may be beneficial in clearing airways. 2. How can one dose of Delsym 12 Hour Cough Liquid provide longer cough relief than one dose of other cough suppressant liquids? Delsym 12 Hour Cough Liquid is made with a patented time-release formulation that provides cough relief for up to 12 hours per dose. 3. When will I start to feel relief once using Delsym products? Some individuals may start to feel the effects soon after dosing while for others it may take longer or it may take several doses. If you have any additional questions, please be sure to speak with your healthcare provider. Please ask your healthcare provider before use if you are pregnant. 5. Can Delsym products be used with an existing medical condition (i.e. diabetes, asthma, etc.)? Speak with your healthcare provider if you are under a doctor's care for an existing medical condition or are taking any other medication before taking Delsym products. 6. Does the Delsym product dosage need to be adjusted for different body mass index (BMI)? No, the Delsym product dosage for adults and children 12 years of age and older should be followed using the dosing directions on the product label. There is no adjustment for BMI. For further questions please contact your healthcare provider. 7. Does Delsym 12 Hour Cough Liquid contain a fever reducer or pain reliever? No. Delsym contains a single active ingredient, dextromethorphan, which controls cough. 8. C Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release An ingredient found in cough medicine may assist in treating diabetes, according to a new study out of the Heinrich Heine University in Dsseldorf, Germany. According to the study , published in the journal Nature Medicine, dextromethorphan, often listed simply as DM on the labels of cold medications, boosted the release of insulin in mice, human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small group of diabetes patients. DM has far fewer side effects than most current type 2 diabetes drugs, which is what prompted the doctors to believe it may be a new potential treatment option. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by very high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which the cells require to live. But people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin (which comes from the pancreas and moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells where its needed). As a result, blood sugar remains high, unable to move to the cells. The authors of the study interestingly did not plan on studying dextromethorphan as a potential treatment for diabetes initially; instead, they fell into it by chance. Inspired by previous research, the authors were originally focusing on a disorder called hyperinsulism, which is essentially the opposite of diabetes in that it involves a person having too much insulin. They hypothesized that dextromethorphan would actually lower and suppress insulin release in patients with hyperinsulinism. But while studying it, they discovered that a certain compound thats released as a byproduct of DM, dextrorphan, actually increased insulin release from a patients pancreas thus making it potentially useful in treating type 2 diabetes. The researchers arent entirely sure how it works Continue reading >>

Delsym Diabetes Mellitus Causes And Reviews

Delsym Diabetes Mellitus Causes And Reviews

The patient was hospitalized. Although Delsym demonstrated significant improvements in a number of clinically relevant cases, troublesome symptoms, such as Diabetes Mellitus, may still occur. Pallor, Pneumonia, Hyperhidrosis, Erythema, Diabetes Mellitus, Blood Pressure Increased An adverse event was reported by a consumer or non-health professional on Feb 07, 2012 by a Female taking Delsym (dosage: Taking 1 Dose Every 12 Hours) was diagnosed with and. Location: UNITED STATES , 39 years of age, patient began experiencing various side effects, including: Directly after treatment started, patient experienced the unwanted or unexpected Delsym side effects: pallor, pneumonia, hyperhidrosis, erythema, diabetes mellitus, blood pressure increased. Additional medications/treatments: The patient was hospitalized. Diabetes Mellitus, Pneumonia, Erythema, Blood Pressure Increased, Pallor, Hyperhidrosis This Diabetes Mellitus problem was reported by a consumer or non-health professional from UNITED STATES. A 39-year-old female patient (weight: NA) was diagnosed with the following medical condition(s): cough , nasopharyngitis ,anxiety.On Jan 26, 2012 a consumer started treatment with Delsym (dosage: Taking 1 Dose Every 12 Hours). The following drugs/medications were being taken at the same time: NA. When commencing Delsym, the patient experienced the following unwanted symptoms /side effects: The patient was hospitalized. Although all drugs are carefully tested before they are licensed for use, they carry potential side effect risks. Some side effects, such as Diabetes Mellitus, may become evident only after a product is in use by the general population. Pallor, Hyperhidrosis, Diabetes Mellitus, Erythema, Pneumonia, Blood Pressure Increased This is a Delsym side effect report of a 39 Continue reading >>

Delsym: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Delsym: Indications, Side Effects, Warnings - Drugs.com

Generic Name: Dextromethorphan Extended-Release Suspension (deks troe meth OR fan) What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Delsym? If you have an allergy to dextromethorphan or any other part of Delsym (dextromethorphan extended-release suspension). If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives ; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. If you have a long-term cough caused by smoking or being around smoke, or lung problems like asthma or emphysema . If you have a cough with a lot of mucous. If you have taken certain drugs used for low mood ( depression ) like isocarboxazid , phenelzine , or tranylcypromine or drugs used for Parkinson's disease like selegiline or rasagiline in the last 14 days. Taking Delsym (dextromethorphan extended-release suspension) within 14 days of those drugs can cause very bad high blood pressure. This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with Delsym (dextromethorphan extended-release suspension). Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins ) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Delsym (dextromethorphan extended-release suspension) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. Seasoned Pro: Be Mindful of These Winter Health Hazards What are some things I need to know or do while I take Delsym? Tell all of your health care providers that you take Delsym (dextromethorphan extended-release suspension). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharma Continue reading >>

Cough Syrup

Cough Syrup

I just recently had a cold, my first as a diabetic. And when the symptoms got too bad i did what i always used to do. I took some cough syrup (Benelyn1 all in 1). I took it in the morning before i went to work, and 1/2 hour after i had taken the medicine i started to feel funny. I just thought i was really tired on the ride into work, but as soon as i stepped out of the car ... I couldn't feel my legs , i felt woozy , everything seemed far away or like a dream, and i had loss of memory. It was funny, i was not making any sense when i talked and couldn't understand what people were saying or why they were even at work with me. Its a good thing i didn't drive! that would've been scary , not for me but for the other people on the road. my brother tried to convince me to go the hospital , but in my fuzzy-marble-head state i refused. Him and a few others had to force me to go. I was tripping out bad. i was just wondering if it was because of my insulin , and what type of medicine i can take when i'm sick. it's never happened before, i took the same amount and the same type as i always do. Did you happen to test when feeling "funny"? It sounds similar to symptoms of a low. When you feel abnormal, its a good idea to check your bg just to be on the safe side. The symptoms you were experiencing could have been caused by the medication as some of the things you are experiencing are side effects of the medication. I usually don't take anything when I have a cold or the flu, unless I have a headache or general body aches or a fever, I will take Tylenol or motrin. I find it better to cough up the "junk" and let it run its course than take something which inhibits you to "drain" out the junk. I will increase my fluids (the clearer the better) and monitor my bg's and ketones (if nece Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Delsym Cough Syrup Side Effects

Delsym Cough Syrup Side Effects

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Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Symptoms: Congestion, mucus in sinus passages Best options: Decongestant pseudoephedrine (Sudafed); phenylephrine; phenylpropalamine Symptoms: Phlegm, mucus in respiratory tract Best option: Expectorant guaifenesin (Mucinex, Robitussin) Symptoms: Pain and/or fever Best options: Analgesic acetaminophen (Tylenol); aspirin For fever and pain relief, look to analgesics, including aspirin and acetaminophen. Both are safe for most people and commonly available. The analgesic class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), which includes ibuprofen and naproxen, may increase blood pressure and is not a good choice for people with kidney problems. Note: Be sure to call your doctor if your temperature rises above 103 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms: Runny nose, itchy eyes Best option: Antihistamine Less-sedating options: certirizine (Zyrtec); loratadine (Claritin) More-sedating options: chlorpheniramine (Chlortrimeton); diphenhydramine (Benadryl) For a stuffy nose, oral decongestants (pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, phenylpropalamine) can increase both blood glucose and blood pressure and therefore are not usually recommended. "The occasional use of a decongestant should be the rule," says Robert Busch, M.D., an endocrinologist from Albany, New York. You'll have to sign the pharmacy register for over-the-counter remedies containing pseudoephedrine. Federal law limits pseudoephedrine purchases because the drug can be used to make illegal methamphetamine. All oral antihistamines are Continue reading >>

Watching Your Sugar? Watch Out For Cough Syrup!

Watching Your Sugar? Watch Out For Cough Syrup!

Q Since I have diabetes, should I worry about the sugar in cough and cold medicines? A People with diabetes do need to think twice before buying over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold and flu medications. Many of these medications contain various forms of sugar, often in the form of high-fructose corn syrup—but the labels don’t state how much sugar the product contains per dose. It’s a dilemma because in some cases the carbs, mostly from sugar, are so high it’s equivalent to a snack—and that affects blood sugar. The products I have investigated vary greatly from having just a few milligrams of carbs per dose to having as much as 24 grams—about as much as you’d find in a Hershey’s chocolate bar! To confuse matters further, some have alcohol in them, which can reduce blood sugar levels…while being sick in the first place can increase blood sugar levels. My first bit of advice: Keep your blood sugar under control when you are well. If your blood sugar is consistently well-managed, an occasional rise in blood sugar from a medication isn’t a concern, and you should be fine taking an OTC medication for a few days. But if your blood sugar is often elevated or is hard to control, be especially careful when buying these medications… Be a carb sleuth. Most cough and cold liquid preparations have some sugar to make them taste better. Look for tell-tale ingredients that spell S-U-G-A-R—high-fructose corn syrup, corn syrup or sucrose. But being listed as an ingredient doesn’t answer how much sugar is in the product. My own informal investigation has found that Robitussin Cough + Chest DM came in very low (0.67 grams (g) of carbs per adult dose) and Delsym Cough 12 Hour Cough Relief was low (3.6 g of carbs per adult dose). But NyQuil Cold & Flu Nighttime Relief Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

Treating The Common Cold And Type 2 Diabetes

It is that time of year again and as a Pharmacist/Certified Diabetes Educator one of the most common questions over the fall, the holiday’s and winter months is “What do you have to treat my cold?” or simply “Can you make me feel better?” Well there is no cure and we cannot wave our “therapeutic” wand and make symptoms disappear but there are a variety of products to help with the symptoms of cough and cold. If the patient is relatively healthy it may be a bit of a hit or miss scenario but usually the product will ease the symptoms until the cold runs its course over 7 to 10 days. The picture becomes less clear when the patient is taking other medications, has medical conditions such as kidney disease, blood pressure, or they have diabetes. Assisting our patient choose an appropriate product that will not worsen their existing medical conditions, and lessen the symptoms that make them feel miserable is key. Diabetes is a condition that requires some adjusting to choose the right product. It is not always a “Sugar free”, “Natural”, or alternative product that is best, as active ingredients may have issues. These include raising blood sugars, raising blood pressure or stressing the kidneys (common issues with diabetes). Usually after a brief discussion to educate the patient, a product can be chosen to help both their symptoms and minimally impact their diabetes and blood sugars. The discussion that follows is a practical approach on how to decide what a person with diabetes can use so that they understand why we avoid certain classes of products due to a their existing medical conditions. Blood Sugars Can Rise when Ill It is important to realize that when a person with diabetes is “fighting” a cold it produces stresses on the body as a whole and Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

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