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Death Due To Diabetes In India

Review Diabetes Care In India

Review Diabetes Care In India

Abstract Diabetes has become a major health care problem in India with an estimated 66.8 million people suffering from the condition, representing the largest number of any country in the world. The rising burden of diabetes has greatly affected the health care sector and economy in India. The goal of health care experts in India is to transform India into a diabetes care capital in the world. An expert detailed review of the medical literature with an Asian Indian context was performed. Recent epidemiologic studies from India point to a great burden from diabetes. Diabetes control in India is far from ideal with a mean hemoglobin A1c of 9.0%—at least 2.0% higher than suggested by international bodies. Nearly half of people with diabetes remain undetected, accounting for complications at the time of diagnosis. Screening can differentiate an asymptomatic individual at high risk from one at low risk for diabetes. Despite the large number of people with diabetes in India, awareness is low and needs to be addressed. Other challenges include balancing the need for glycemic control with risk reduction due to overly tight control, especially in high-risk groups and taking into account health care professional expertise, attitudes, and perceptions. Pharmacologic care should be individualized with early consideration of combination therapy. Regular exercise, yoga, mindful eating, and stress management form a cornerstone in the management of diabetes. Considering the high cost incurred at various steps of screening, diagnosis, monitoring, and management, it is important to realize the cost-effective measures of diabetes care that are necessary to implement. Result-oriented organized programs involving patient education, as well as updating the medical fraternity on various deve Continue reading >>

Global Pandemic Of Diabetes: An Indian Perspective

Global Pandemic Of Diabetes: An Indian Perspective

Global Pandemic of Diabetes: An Indian Perspective Dr Aravinda Jagadeesha MD, MRCP(London,UK), FRCP(Edinburgh,UK), Consultant Diabetologist, Dr Aravinds Diabetes Centre, Karnataka, India Diabetes mellitus (DM), an increasingly common metabolic disorder, creates a significant public health burden. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified that non-communicable diseases (NCD) are an important global health hazard and DM is one of the four main NCD which immediately demands the global attention.1 This chronic disorder is also a top 10 cause of death globally and has attained pandemic proportions worldwide. In 2015 diabetes killed around 1.6 million people globally (direct cause of death).2 According to the recent Global Burden of Disease Study (2015), diabetes ranked 15th in the global list of leading causes of years of life lost (YLLs).3 Furthermore, the third highest risk factor for global premature mortality is high blood glucose after high blood pressure and tobacco use.4 According to the estimates of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), globally 415 million people are suffering from diabetes (with global prevalence: 8.8%) of which 75% live in low- and middle-income countries. With this trend, by 2040, the world will have 642 million people suffering from diabetes. Type-II DM is the predominant clinical form rather than type-I DM. The majority of the diabetes population (87-91%) in high- income countries have type-II diabetes. Data for relative proportions of type-I and type-II diabetes is not available for low- and middle- income countries,. Globally the type-I diabetes population increases each year by approximately 3 %.4 India is an influential hub for the global diabetes epidemic with the second highest diabetes population in the world (~69 millio Continue reading >>

Mortality Rates Due To Diabetes In A Selected Urban South Indian Population--the Chennai Urban Population Study [cups--16].

Mortality Rates Due To Diabetes In A Selected Urban South Indian Population--the Chennai Urban Population Study [cups--16].

1. J Assoc Physicians India. 2006 Feb;54:113-7. Mortality rates due to diabetes in a selected urban south Indian population--the Chennai Urban Population Study [CUPS--16]. Mohan V(1), Shanthirani CS, Deepa M, Deepa R, Unnikrishnan RI, Datta M. (1)Diabetes Specialities Centre and Madras Diabetes Research Foundation, Gopalapuram, Chennai, India. Comment in J Assoc Physicians India. 2006 Feb;54:105-6. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects in urban south India.METHODS: The Chennai Urban Population Study is an ongoing epidemiological studyin Chennai [formerly Madras, in south India]. All individuals > or = 20 years of age living in two residential colonies in Chennai were invited to participate in the study. Of the total 1399 eligible subjects, 1262 individuals responded[90.2%] at baseline, and of these, 1140 individuals [90.3%] could be followedannually from 1997 to 2003-04. Mortality rates and causes of death were the main outcome measures.RESULTS: The median follow up period was six years. The overall mortality ratewas higher in diabetic compared to non-diabetic subjects [18.9 vs.5.3 per 1000person-years, p=0.004]. Mortality due to cardiovascular [diabetic subjects,52.9%; non-diabetic subjects, 24.2%,p=0.042] and renal causes[diabetic subjects, 23.5%; non-diabetic subjects, 6.1%,p=0.072] was higher among diabetic subjectswhereas mortality due to gastrointestinal 112.1%], respiratory [9.1%], lifestyle related [6.1%] and unnatural causes [18.2%] were observed only among non-diabeticsubjects. Hazards ratio [HR] for all cause mortality for diabetes was 3.6, [95%Confidence Interval [CI]: 2.02-6.53, p<0.001] and this remained significant even after adjusting for age [HR:1.9, 95% CI:1.04-3.45, p=0.038]. Light Continue reading >>

In India, Deaths Due To Diabetes Increased By 50% In Last Decade: Study

In India, Deaths Due To Diabetes Increased By 50% In Last Decade: Study

Home News In India, Deaths Due To Diabetes Increased By 50% In Last Decade:... In India, Deaths Due To Diabetes Increased By 50% In Last Decade: Study Diabetes is now the seventh-most common cause of death in the country. Diabetes patients spend Rs 6,260 in rural area every year for treatment There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India India is predicted to have 123 million diabetes cases by 2040 With a genetic predisposition brought to the fore by changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes increased 50 per cent in India between 2005 and 2015 and is now the seventh-most common cause of death in the country, up from 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease. Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis. In 2015, 346,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3 per cent of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7 per cent from 1990, according to the Global Burden of Disease study. Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 100,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4 per cent of the disability-adjusted life-years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease). There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second-highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to a 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation. Nearly nine per cent in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes. The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not just aff Continue reading >>

Diabetes: A Review Of Awareness, Comorbidities, And Quality Of Life In India

Diabetes: A Review Of Awareness, Comorbidities, And Quality Of Life In India

Department of Development Studies, International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Correspondence Address: Balasaheb Bansode International Institute for Population Sciences, Mumbai - 400 088, Maharashtra India Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None DOI: 10.4103/joshd.J_Soc_Health_Diabetes_40_16 Diabetes is one of the major contributors for the noncommunicable diseases. The disease burden due to diabetes is huge, and it not only puts pressure on the diabetes patients but also it adds pressure on the economy of the developing and underdeveloped nations. In India, the burden due to diabetes is more important as every fifth person is a diabetic. This paper reviews awareness and source of knowledge of diabetes, awareness about risk factors, and complications of diabetes in India. The review reveals that (a) awareness about diabetes is less in India; (b) awareness regarding specific risk factors associated with diabetes (obesity, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and high blood pressure) is found to be less; (c) there is a negative association between duration of diabetes and health-related quality of life; and (d) microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and coronary diseases) are major comorbidities affecting the diabetes patients. The review reveals that it is imperative to work effectively toward implementing a holistic program for diabetes prevention by ensuring proper awareness in the community. Keywords: Awareness, comorbidities, diabetes, India, quality of life How to cite this article: Bansode B, Nagarajan R. Diabetes: A review of awareness, comorbidities, and quality of life in India. J Soc Health Diabetes 2017;5:77-82 Despite the high global burden of mortality and morbidity from noncommunicable dis Continue reading >>

High Bp And Diabetes Major Causes Of Death In Delhi Than Other Diseases

High Bp And Diabetes Major Causes Of Death In Delhi Than Other Diseases

According to the State of Health of Delhi report released by Praja Foundation, an NGO, these two diseases kill more people than any other disease. Here are some more findings of this report. High BP and Diabetes Major Causes of Death in Delhi than Other Diseases Indians have several ailments that run in the family and due to the hectic lifestyles we lead today, we become susceptible to many more diseases as well. According to a 2015 survey conducted by NGO Praja Foundation, the alarming number of deaths caused by hypertension or high blood pressure and diabetes are far more than any other diseases. This report is based on a sample size of 24,301 households and took place in the capital to assess the health of the people residing in Delhi. The report also concluded that there was a rise in the number of cases of high BP from 3,22,510 in 2015 to 3,61,443 in 2016. And the number of deaths caused by diabetes rose to 1356 and hypertension to 3890 in 2015. These numbers were collected from government-run hospitals and dispensaries in Delhi. (ALSO SEE 10 common causes of high blood pressure ) While dengue and malaria are also common diseases that affect Delhi residents, the death toll for these two in 2015 was 486 by dengue and 164 by malaria. Most number of deaths by communicable diseases was due to TB or tuberculosis. It killed a whopping 3635 people in 2015. Even so, few questions were raised by MLAs about this disease and its rising death toll. (ALSO SEE 5 home remedies to control diabetes ) Another major ailment that affected the people of Delhi was diarrhea. Even though it was not high on the number of death toll, it did affect about six lakh people annually in the capital and the most number of deaths due to this disease was of children below the age of four. Over the Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Diabetes Deaths Increased By 35% In 10 Years In India | India News - Times Of India

Diabetes: Diabetes Deaths Increased By 35% In 10 Years In India | India News - Times Of India

Diabetes deaths increased by 35 in 10 years in India Diabetes deaths increased by 35% in 10 years in India NEW DELHI: Deaths due to diabetes in India has been increasing, the Rajya Sabha was informed by the health ministry on Tuesday. It would appear that India is not only the capital of diabetes, but care is so poor that deaths due to the condition is increasing. The Indian Council of Medical Research has informed that according to the Global Burden of Disease Report 2015, the number of deaths due to diabetes increased from 2.24 lakhs (in the year 2005) to 3.46 lakhs (in the year 2015). ``Thus, leading the shift from 11th position to 7th position in terms of cause of death due to diabetes,'' the house was told in a written reply by the minister of state (health and family welfare) Faggan Singh Kulaste. The minister's reply also mentioned that the Indian government has been implementing the National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer , Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke (NPCDCS) for interventions up to district level under the National Health Mission . ``It has a focus on awareness generation for behaviour and life-style changes, screening and early diagnosis of persons with high level of risk factors and their treatment and referral (if required) to higher facilities for appropriate management for non- communicable siseases including diabetes,'' it said. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. Read more India news in English and other languages. Continue reading >>

6 Million Died Of Non-communicable Diseases In India In 2016: Study

6 Million Died Of Non-communicable Diseases In India In 2016: Study

Ischemic heart disease was the leading cause of death, according to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2016 study published in Lancet . New Delhi: Over six million people died of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in India in 2016, with Ischemic heart disease being the leading cause of death, according to the findings of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2016 study that was published in medical journal Lancet on Friday. The study said seven of the top 10 causes of death among all age-groups in India are non-communicable diseases or injuries. While self-harm is the largest cause of death in the 10-24 age group, deaths due to diabetes and chronic kidney disease have also increased over the past decade. India stands at a poor 127th rank among 188 countries in terms of achieving the UNs health related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with low scores in air pollution, sanitation, hepatitis B and child waste, according to the study. Death of children under 5 years continues to be a major concern for India as the largest number of deaths at 0.9 million in 2016 were registered in the country. Nigeria comes a close second with 0.7 million deaths, followed by the Democratic Republic of the Congo with 0.3 million deaths. The contribution of NCDs to death and disability in India continues to grow at an alarming ratea ticking time bomb that is increasingly affecting not just our health but our economy as well, Dr. Vivekanand Jha, executive director, The George Institute for Global Health, said. The report points out the value of knowing these cause-specific mortality data in framing action to meet SDGs, and highlights the continued neglect by the SDG agenda to some important causes of health burden, of whom chronic kidney disease is particularly relevant to India, having risen Continue reading >>

More Indians Are Being Killed By Higher Blood Pressure, Diabetes And Pollution Than Before

More Indians Are Being Killed By Higher Blood Pressure, Diabetes And Pollution Than Before

More Indians Are Being Killed by Higher Blood Pressure, Diabetes and Pollution Than Before High blood pressure, high blood sugar and household air pollution from solid fuels together contributed to 3.3 million premature deaths in India in 2013. Credit: tawheedmanzoor/Flickr , CC BY 2.0 Fewer peoplein India are now dying due to ailments associated with childhood undernutrition and unsafe water sources, but more are suffering health loss and death from diseases attributable to high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high cholesterol according to a new analysis of 79 risk factors in 188 countries. In 1990, childhood undernutrition was the leading cause of deaths in India but does not figure in the top 10 causes of deaths now. Instead, alcohol use and high body mass index, which did not kill as many people in 1990, are now among the top 10 killers. High blood pressure, high blood sugar and household air pollution from solid fuels were estimated to cause 7.8%, 5.2% and 4.7% of the total health loss in India in 2013, respectively. These three risk factors together contributed to 3.3 million premature deaths in India in 2013. The other major contributors to health loss in India are unsafe water sources, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, high blood cholesterol and air pollution. The contributions of unsafe water sources and poor sanitation as well as child and maternal undernutrition to health loss have dropped significantly since 1990, though they remainsubstantial contributors to health loss in India. The risk factors examined in the study contributed to a total of 30.8 million deaths worldwide in 2013, up by afifth from 25.1 million deaths in 1990. The top risks associated with deaths among both men and women globally are high blood pressure, smoking, high body mass index, an Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease Www.idf.org/cvd

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease Www.idf.org/cvd

Published by the International Diabetes Federation © International Diabetes Federation, 2016 ISBN: 978-2-930229-83-6 EAN: 9782930229836 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written prior permission of the IDF. Requests to reproduce or translate IDF publications should be addressed to [email protected] Cite this executive summary as: International Diabetes Federation. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation, 2016. www.idf.org/cvd Correspondence Dr Lydia Makaroff International Diabetes Federation, 166 Chaussée de La Hulpe, B-1170 Brussels – Belgium [email protected] Design Designed by Anne-Françoise Minique De Visu Digital Document Design – Belgium www.devisu.com Photo credits iStock: p.10 - Shutterstock: p.3 De Visu: p.5 - De Visu + Ingimage: p.12 Support The preparation of this document was made possible through a grant provided by AstraZeneca. The supporter had no influence on the scope or the content of this publication. Beat NCDs The #beatNCDs campaign and symbol are initiatives of the World Health Organization. The symbol is a half ribbon; the four strokes that create it symbolize the four diseases that account for the majority of non-communicable disease deaths worldwide — diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic respiratory disease. The symbol also evokes the idea of legs walking. Main authors David Cavan, International Diabetes Federation, Belgium Jessica Harding, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia Ute Linnenkamp, International Diabetes Federation, Belgium Lydia Makaroff, International Diabetes Federation, Belgium Dianna Magliano, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institu Continue reading >>

50% Rise In Diabetes Deaths Across India Over 11 Years

50% Rise In Diabetes Deaths Across India Over 11 Years

With a genetic predisposition brought to the fore by changing lifestyles, deaths due to diabetes increased 50% in India between 2005 and 2015, and is now the seventh most common cause of death in the country, up from the 11th rank in 2005, according to data published by the Global Burden of Disease (GDB). Ischemic heart disease continues to be the highest cause of death, followed by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infection, diarrhoeal diseases and tuberculosis. In 2015, 346,000 people died of diabetes, which caused 3.3% of all deaths that year, with an annual increase of 2.7% from 1990, according to the GDB study. Nearly 26 people die of diabetes per 100,000 population; diabetes is also one of the top causes of disability and accounts for 2.4% of the disability adjusted life years lost (sum of years lost due to disability or premature death due to the disease). Source: Global Burden of Disease, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) There are 69.1 million people with diabetes in India, the second highest number in the world after China, which has 109 million people with diabetes. Of these, 36 million cases remain undiagnosed, according to this 2015 Diabetes Atlas released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Nearly 9% in the age group of 20-79 have diabetes. The figures are alarming since diabetes is a chronic disease that not just affects the pancreas’ ability to produce insulin but affects the entire body. Complications caused due to diabetes include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, vision loss and neuropathy or nerve damage leading to leg amputation. Unlike other countries, where a majority of people with diabetes are over 60 years old, the prevalence in India is among the 40-59 years a Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

India Tops The List For Male Deaths From Diabetes

India Tops The List For Male Deaths From Diabetes

An estimated 122,700 men aged 30 and above die from diabetes in India every year, compared with 86,300 men in China, a more populous country. More women in China die of diabetes, 138,400, compared with 97,300 in India. In the U.S., 37,000 men and 34,000 women die of diabetes, the study said. Diabetes accounts for 2% of all deaths of all ages in India, the report said. The global prevalence of the condition has nearly doubled since 1980 to 8.5% in the adult population from 4.7%, reflecting an increase in risk factors like obesity, the study said. China and India have had the highest increases in obesity rates since 1975, according to a recent study published in the British medical journal, the Lancet. The prevalence of diabetes is “steadily increasing everywhere, most markedly in the world’s middle-income countries,” said Margaret Chan, director-general of WHO in the diabetes report. The economic fallout for families dealing with the disease in middle and poorer income countries can be tremendous, Ms. Chan said, especially for those who need life-saving insulin and lack access to affordable medication. Diabetes is a chronic disease which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Complications that arise can lead to diseases such obesity, nerve damage, vision loss, cardiovascular and kidney illnesses. India’s government, in trying to deal with growing renal failure rates in the country stemming from diabetic complications, said in February that dialysis centers will be set up in hundreds of district hospitals across the country as part of the country’s spending on public healthcare. India’s diabetes problem poses a conundrum for experts. Some say Indians are predisposed to the disease, others say the Indian Continue reading >>

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

The Current State Of Diabetes Mellitus In India

Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India with more than 62 million diabetic individuals currently diagnosed with the disease.1,2 In 2000, India (31.7 million) topped the world with the highest number of people with diabetes mellitus followed by China (20.8 million) with the United States (17.7 million) in second and third place respectively. According to Wild et al.3 the prevalence of diabetes is predicted to double globally from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030 with a maximum increase in India. It is predicted that by 2030 diabetes mellitus may afflict up to 79.4 million individuals in India, while China (42.3 million) and the United States (30.3 million) will also see significant increases in those affected by the disease.3,4 India currently faces an uncertain future in relation to the potential burden that diabetes may impose upon the country. Many influences affect the prevalence of disease throughout a country, and identification of those factors is necessary to facilitate change when facing health challenges. So what are the factors currently affecting diabetes in India that are making this problem so extreme? The aetiology of diabetes in India is multifactorial and includes genetic factors coupled with environmental influences such as obesity associated with rising living standards, steady urban migration, and lifestyle changes. Yet despite the incidence of diabetes within India, there are no nationwide and few multi-centric studies conducted on the prevalence of diabetes and its complications. The studies that have been undertaken are also prone to potential error as the heterogeneity of the Indian population with respect to culture, ethnicity, socio- economic conditions, mean that the extrapolation of regional results may g Continue reading >>

Mortality And Causes Of Death In A National Sample Of Diabetic Patients In Taiwan

Mortality And Causes Of Death In A National Sample Of Diabetic Patients In Taiwan

OBJECTIVE—To determine the mortality rate, causes of death, and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in Taiwanese diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A cohort of 256,036 diabetic patients (118,855 men and 137,181 women, aged 61.2 ± 15.2 years) using the National Health Insurance were assembled during the years 1995–1998 and followed up to the end of 2001. Deaths were verified by indexing to the National Register of Deaths. Underlying causes of death were determined from death certificates coded according to the ninth revision of the International Classification of Diseases. The general population of Taiwan was used as reference for SMR calculation. RESULTS—With a total of 1,124,348.4 person-years of follow-up, 43,888 patients died and the crude mortality rate was 39.0/1,000 person-years. Mortality rates increased with age, and diabetic men had a significantly higher risk of death than women. However, mortality rate ratio for men versus women attenuated with increasing age. The overall SMR was 1.63 (1.62–1.65), and SMRs also attenuated in the elderly. Causes of death ascribed to diabetes; cancer; cardiopulmonary disease; stroke; disease of arteries, arterioles, and capillaries; nephropathy; infection; digestive diseases; accidents; and suicide were 28.8, 18.5, 9.0, 10.5, 0.3, 4.8, 6.4, 7.9, 3.2, and 0.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS—Approximately 71.2% of the diabetes-related deaths would not be ascribed to diabetes on death certificates in Taiwan. The diabetic men have higher risk of dying than women, and diabetic patients have excess mortality when compared with the general population. For underlying causes of death not listed as diabetes, total cardiovascular death, including cardiopulmonary disease, stroke, and disease of arteries, arterioles, and Continue reading >>

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