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Dating Someone With Diabetes

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

I know a lot of women with Type 1 diabetes. Some are friends, colleagues, peers and some are women, young and old, whose paths have crossed with mine at different times for different reasons. And even though each and every one of us are different in the way we view, experience and react to our Type 1 diabetes, I typically find that, when we first discover we are both meandering the snaking female Type 1 diabetes footpath, there is a collective knowing, a camaraderie that instantly bonds our lives in an inquisitive way. Often, we will immediately begin to chat like old friends and many times, we will openly begin to share intimate details with each other. We talk about the effect of our diabetes on our careers, our health, our loved ones, spouses, families and friends. For me, it’s emotionally comforting to connect with someone who really and truly gets what I’m going through. Trust me when I say that the emotional side of diabetes is a huge piece of the puzzle and if it is not taken into consideration, it can unravel all well laid diabetes plans. So if you love a woman with Type 1diabetes, maybe this blog will give you a little something to consider. Or maybe you already know everything. That being said…. Women With Type 1 Diabetes and Sexual Intimacy Ever try to enjoy sex with Type 1 diabetes while worrying about your blood sugar dropping or soaring? How about having your medical devices front and center on your body? And because of the cost, and inconvenience I might add, of a device being knocked off, I always have to consider where my devices are on my body to help avoid that scenario. And even after marriage to a man who says he doesn’t care about my devices, the thought that I will look “medicinal” to him creates vulnerability in me that I don’t like Continue reading >>

Loving Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

Loving Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

By kelley on April 29, 2016 in health , Marriage and Relationships , Mom Resources When I first started dating my husband I didnt even really know what the term blood sugar meant. I certainly didnt know what was considered a normal blood sugar range (which is around 80-120). And I had no idea that my life would soon revolve around these numbers. Type 1 diabetes wasnt even in my vocabulary. I thought there was just one type of diabetes, the kind that can be controlled with diet and exercise ( Type 2 diabetes ) Most of all, I had no idea Type 1 diabetes was life threatening. My husband and I had only been dating a few weeks when I had to make the frantic 911 call. I had no idea that my husband had Type 1 diabetes. We were newly dating and I wasnt privied to this personal information yet. Because of my husbands private nature and my navet, my husband fell into a diabetic coma before my very eyes.We werent partying. Not in the excessive drinking context. In fact, we werent drinking at all. Just wasnt our style. We had just watched the fireworks in Boston and had barbecued all day with his old crew team. At the end of the night we were talking at his house when his speech became slurred and very disorganized. Then what seemed like only minutes later, he became unresponsive. Luckily, his identical twin brother was still in the house and I ran to his room and told him that something was wrong with his brother. This is when I became glaringly aware of the depths of Type 1 diabetes. All I could do was watch as his brother frantically tried to force juice and sugar tablets down his throat. But Taylor was too far gone. His blood sugar was so low it didnt even register on the glucose meter. I called 911 and paramedics arrived seemingly quickly and gave him a glucagon shot. Within Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Dating: To Date Or Not To Date

Diabetes & Dating: To Date Or Not To Date

A question we get asked all the time: Should I date someone if I have diabetes? or Should I date someone who has diabetes? Take a look at these Diabetes & Relationship stats: Relationships are tough in this day and age. With approximately 60 percent of all marriages ending in divorce, does diabetes stack the deck against you in a committed, long-term relationship? When Dennis contacted The Diabetes Council last week, he was concerned that dating Susan with Type 1 diabetes may not a good idea. He didn’t know if he could handle her having a low blood sugar during their time together, and he worried that his own fear of needles would make him too squeamish to deal with the day-to-day aspects of diabetes care. Dennis and Susan have only been out on three dates. Dennis enjoyed his time with Susan, and wanted to see if they could have a future together. However, it was at the end of the third date when Susan informed Dennis about her diabetes. Dennis had been at a loss for words since finding out about Susan’s diagnosis. He was ashamed to say that he had not called her in three days. So what kind of advice should we give Dennis? Although we may not be in the position to give him an answer as to whether or not he should date Susan, what kind of relationship advice might be helpful in this situation? For starters, if Dennis wants to pursue a future relationship with Susan, he should ask himself just how much he cares about her, and whether or not he thinks that he is capable of supporting someone with diabetes through the long haul of life. If the answer is yes, then a diagnosis of diabetes should not preclude Dennis from pursuing a relationship with Susan. If the answer is no, then Susan is better off without Dennis. As a person with diabetes, Susan will need someone who i Continue reading >>

Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Dating a person with type 1 diabetes brings some very unique challenges to any relationship. Of course, simply being the diabetic and dating can be difficult for some, but this article is for those non-diabetics who find themselves attracted to someone who just happens to also live with this disease. I use the word “dating” purposefully, to mark a relationship that is new or in its first few years rather than a relationship that has progressed to “living together” or marriage. The word “dating” implies that you, as the non-diabetic, are in the early stages of learning about your partner’s diabetes. While there are many experiences, stories, and perspectives, a woman named Heidi shares her experience in a 2-year relationship with a man who lived with type 1 diabetes. Her experience is one of many. Be sure to read our “Non-Diabetics Guide to Helping Loved Ones with Diabetes,” too. Ginger: When you first began dating, did you know about his type 1 diabetes from the start or was it introduced at some point? Heidi: I knew from the very first date. We were up too late talking like teenagers and he realized his blood was low. He excused himself to get a glass of milk and a snack. I had known him as a friend for an entire year prior. I did not know. I don’t think he would have told me right away, but the circumstances brought it to light early on. Ginger: When you learned about his diabetes, how did you feel? Did it change anything about how you perceived him in a negative or positive way? Heidi: I felt embarrassed that I did not know or recognize the signs that his blood sugar was low. I asked him if I should have noticed. The knowledge did not change how I felt emotionally. It did make me want to be educated. Ginger: Was he open to talking about and teachi Continue reading >>

Dating With Diabetes... Might Mean Kissing A Few Frogs

Dating With Diabetes... Might Mean Kissing A Few Frogs

Just in time for Valentine's Day tomorrow, we've got some insight to share about dating and diabetes. Not from Mike and myself, of course, since we've both been married to our respective partners for many years now, but we asked our newest team member, twenty-something Cait Patterson, to offer some personal insight on the topic of the "mating dance": What's it like being out there these days, especially with diabetes in the mix? (You may remember that last month, Cait shared her story about being diagnosed a few years ago when she was just starting college at age 18, and also being hit with celiac disease at the same time.) Special to the 'Mine by Cait Patterson Being diagnosed in college and trying to figure out my new life with diabetes while meeting new people was tough. But multiply that awkwardness times 10, and you pretty much can get an idea of what my college dating life is like. When first diagnosed, I would hop into relationships thinking that I'd tell the lucky young lad about my diabetes, and he would automatically spring into superman mode, be a partner in my management and diabetes would be all better. Well, no, it doesn't usually work that way. During that first year, I would start dating a guy, abruptly bring up my diabetes, and then it would suddenly feel like an awkwardly taboo topic. If I didn't get much of a response, I would hound the poor guy with questions: "Are you OK that I have diabetes? Are you okay with me taking shots? Does this freak you out?" And so on. In accordance with almost every social psychology concept in the book, the more uncomfortably I presented my life with diabetes, the more uncomfortable my date was with it. Most, if not all of these men, had never been aware of what a person with type 1 diabetes deals with everyday. And as Continue reading >>

Dating And Type 2 Diabetes

Dating And Type 2 Diabetes

I dislike dating. There’s just something incredibly disingenuous about it. We meet people in artificial settings, dress fancier than usual, and present ourselves as better versions of our usual personas. We try very hard to make a good impression, so we’re on our best game. Some of us play well at this game, and some of us do not. Some of us are mature, understanding adults about the ways of this world, and the frail people within it – and some of us are not. Enter type 2 diabetes. My first experience with how negative type 2 diabetes could be for my life and my emotional well-being happened when I didn’t even have type 2 diabetes. I was 20, and full of young and hopeful love for another young man who, apparently, didn’t share those same sentiments. Maybe he just didn’t like me and found his first excuse to dump me, but it was nonetheless a painful excuse: “I have a family history of diabetes, and I can’t be with you because you also have a family history. If we were to get married, our children’s future would be doomed.” I never told my father why this young man ‘dumped’ me. I knew he had been battling his type 2 diabetes for many years, and had serious issues with depression. I didn’t want to let him see how it was also affecting my life – the lives of his children. But I had a lot of mixed emotions from this experience: I felt discriminated, devalued as a human being, hurt and angry, and also, and most importantly… I felt as damaged goods. I couldn’t understand how he had already assumed our futures would be written in stone before they even happened, and I feared this was the beginning of future discrimination and rejection by potential partners. It’s normal to fear how a person will judge us for having type 2 diabetes. After all Continue reading >>

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Your birth experience may be different to the one that you had expected, and this can be hard to come to terms with. Finding out what might happen could help you feel mentally prepared for what may lie ahead. It can help to remember that although the birth itself is important, it is just one step in the journey towards having your baby. Where to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes If you have diabetes, it is recommended that you give birth in a hospital with the support of a consultant-led maternity team. It is not unusual for babies of mothers with diabetes to be larger than normal, which could lead to birth difficulties such as shoulder dystocia (in which the baby’s shoulder gets stuck during the birth). This means that options such as home birth are unlikely to be recommended. When to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes You will be advised to give birth early if you have diabetes. This is to reduce the risk of stillbirth. It is recommended by NICE that women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and no other complications should give birth between 37 weeks and 38 weeks +6 days – either by being induced or having a planned caesarean. If you have any complications that pose a risk to you or the baby, you might be offered an even earlier delivery. 'I had always been aware that I would be on the ward for high-risk cases. I am so grateful to be pregnant, I’m not going to complain about stuff like that. If there is an issue, I would rather be ready for it.' Svenja, mum-to-be How to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes As the recommendation is to give birth by 38+6 weeks, you are likely to be offered an induction or a caesarean section. Diabetes is not in itself a reason that you cannot have vaginal birth. Unless there are other complications there is no reason this should Continue reading >>

Dating And Diabetes

Dating And Diabetes

Dating with diabetes is no different than dating without it Whether you find dating fun or whether it sends your nerves into a flurry, diabetes is one extra thing you may need to think about when dating but all in all it shouldn't get in the way. We run through some of things you may want to consider when making the most of your dating experience with diabetes. When do you tell your date about your diabetes? When you decide to tell your date about your diabetes will be partly influenced by your personal preference and may be influenced by your medication regime. If youre on insulin, or otherwise susceptible to hypoglycemia , its a good idea to let your date know about your diabetes early on. If youre on another medication routine then you may have more time and freedom to choose the right moment. If you inject then its a good idea to explain your need to inject at a convenient time as some people may be squeamish about needles. It may take your date a little time to get used to the idea at first but in most cases your partner will get accommodated with your injection regimes. Wed like to say, no, it doesnt matter but it can depend on how you manage diabetes and your dates own feelings towards your diabetes. Some people will naturally be more receptive to your diabetes than others. Its common for people with diabetes to worry about what their date will make of their diabetes, questions may include: How do I explain I have a lifelong condition? Will he/she worry about my health in the long run? Will he/she run a mile when I start to inject or they see my pump? In the most cases the worries are unfounded and youll tend to find that the more you can accept your own diabetes, the better the chances that your date will be able to. Diabetes can lead to ups and downs in sugar Continue reading >>

Dating + Diabetes = Dilemma?

Dating + Diabetes = Dilemma?

Diabetes is not an obvious illness if you don’t want it to be. I’ve come to learn that you can do your injections every single day in front of someone and they just won’t notice. The places I find myself stabbing my limbs makes me chuckle sometimes… on the tube, at the bus stop, in a club (that did raise a few eyebrows). I’m the kinda girl that doesn’t care at all; diabetes is a common enough thing, and if you can’t take me with diabetes then there ain’t much chance of us getting along! But meeting new people – I’m talking about dating – and getting to the stage where you want to introduce them to this crazy world can be tricky. Confident as I am, whipping out my Novorapid across a candle-lit dinner table can kind of kill the mood if the poor innocent bloke isn’t expecting it. But as I’m yet to meet the man of my dreams (sigh), it’s something I have to deal with – some months more often than others! Join me on this journey… you’ve been on a couple of dates, you’ve so far either not been on one that involved food or you’ve dodged off to the toilet just to save the effort of inquisition. You’re thinking this is a guy you’re kind of going to see a little bit more… so you casually drop it into conversation at some point so they at least have heard the word “diabetes” right? I failed to do this recently; for some reason I had it in my head that the guy in question knew I had Type 1. So there we are, at the dinner table, and I say in the jokey, “witty” manner that I’m so good at, “I’m just going to take some drugs”. Out comes my very official looking pen and I happily start to dial up. The look of horror spreading across said fella’s face as I obliviously counted my carbs and figured out my dosage was a picture. Br Continue reading >>

Diabetes Basics

Diabetes Basics

Basics of diabetes Diabetes is a condition caused by lack of a chemical in the body (a hormone) called insulin. There are two major forms of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes eventually no insulin is produced and individuals require insulin injections for survival. It used to be thought this only presented in children, but it is now clear this can occur at any age. The other more common form of diabetes called type 2 diabetes occurs due to the body's resistance to the effects of insulin in addition to an insufficient quantity of insulin. However, in this type of diabetes there is usually some insulin produced. For both types of diabetes, blood glucose levels are elevated. Furthermore, people with diabetes are prone to certain complications not seen in those without diabetes. These complications involve the eye (retinopathy), kidney (nephropathy) and nerves (neuropathy). People with diabetes also get early hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis), leading to early heart attacks and strokes. The good news for people with diabetes is that with proper care all of these problems can be avoided. Immediate medical attention Uncontrolled diabetes presents with frequent thirst and urination. Over time, patients will become dehydrated as the glucose is "spilling" over into the urine. If insulin deficiency is severe enough, fat stores are used for energy as glucose cannot get into cells. This problem is much more common with type 1 diabetes and is called "ketoacidosis". It can be diagnosed at home with a simple urine test. When significant ketones are found in the urine, it is important to be in touch with a physician immediately. There are other conditions that require immediate attention. Blurry vision in someone with known diabetic eye disease or someone with a long history of di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Dating Site For All Sweet People Like You

Diabetes Dating Site For All Sweet People Like You

Living with Diabetes Can Take its Toll.Sharing Your Life with People WhoUnderstand You Is What Gets You Through it. Meet Them Right Here, Right Now and You'll Be Over the Moon! Enjoy lots of great features available for you to try! Diabetes Dating Site For All Sweet People Like You Diabetes Dating Site - you might ask why? Well, here are some answers. The usual opinion is that we are all equal as human beings and that we share the same experiences. But someone said that there are two kingdoms on Earth, one is for the healthy and the other one for the sick people. It can be easily translated into one kingdom for diabetic people, and the other one for everybody else. It is more than natural that a man or a woman suffering from diabetes would like to share thoughts, emotions, sexuality and life with someone alike. If you are not diabetic than you might ask yourself why is that such an issue. Well, if you have to measure your sugar levels every day sometimes several times a day, when you need insulin injections or insulin pumps (if you are insulin dependent), when you need to take care about your nutrition- in a meticulous way, it is more than understandable why should you look for someone who shares your daily concerns. Diabetes is a chronic condition and it demands a certain lifestyle. Planning family, children or something else it doesn't matter it could be with more smiles and more joy. You will not regret visiting Diabetes Dating Site, not a bit. You will find out you are not alone and that there are many young and old, tall, big, bold, curly men and women from any race and background with whom you will be able to share and find out what you have been looking and fantasized about all the time. That is the reason why Diabetes Dating Site will become your best friend. D Continue reading >>

I Have Never Had Sex With My Diabetic Husband And Probably Never Will

I Have Never Had Sex With My Diabetic Husband And Probably Never Will

I met my husband online a few weeks before my 31st birthday. There was nothing about his profile that would have particularly drawn me to it. He was 33, divorced. We didn't seem to have much in common, and his photo showed an average looking and very nondescript guy. But, as it was my personal policy to give anyone devoid of major dealbreakers a chance, I immediately wrote back. We wrote each other online a few times a day for about a week, when he asked if I would like to meet up. Despite his kind of boring profile, he was witty and charming in the emails, so I felt somewhat hopeful. Our first date was the dictionary definition of "awkward." We met at Starbucks and then walked around outside. We mostly talked about our respective exes. I don't think he laughed or smiled once. I was pretty sure he hated me. So I was fairly surprised when I got a text from him on my way home saying he had a great time and would love to see me again. Our second date wasn't much better. I'm not sure what made me keep talking to him. I think I was just intrigued. Or maybe it was because he showed up when he said he would, held doors for me, and acted like he gave a damn. The night before we went out for the third time I confessed via text that I was wondering what it would be like to kiss him. He replied, "Oh, yeah?" We sat in a park for hours the night of our third date, talking and drinking a bottle of Chardonnay he had brought. He forgot to bring glasses, so we just chugged from the bottle. Well, I did mostly. He was finally loosening up a little bit, even laughing and smiling a tiny bit here and there. I noticed that he was shaking and asked him a few times if he was cold. He told me later that he wasn't cold that night. He was nervous. Eventually the wine hit me and I had to pee really Continue reading >>

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an illness which is not easy to manage and it influences practically everything in life. When someone starts dating a person with type 1 diabetes, there might be some things that are good to know. Firstly, you should know the basics of type 1 diabetes. The internet has tons of very good information available. Here is a nice fact sheet about type 1 diabetes from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The symptoms of hypos and hypers differ amongst diabetics Now that you know the cold facts, you should know that every person with type 1 diabetes is unique. Exercise raises someone’s BG levels, whereas others have to drink sugary drinks to avoid going low. Different diabetics experience low or high blood glucose levels differently. One might get angry or anxious when approaching a low BG, whereas some just go pale and shaky. It gets worse at the grocery store if one has a hypo standing in line with a chocolate bar in hand. They would just want to pay for the candy bar so they can eat it but the queue just won’t MOVE! That for e.g. is when I feel a bit aggressive but I have learned to just eat the candy bar while standing there and pay for the wrap. Eventually you’ll probably learn to see when your significant other is acting “like in a hypo”. However, you might want to avoid suggesting a blood glucose measurement. Nothing feels as frustrating when someone invalidates a type 1 diabetic’s negative emotions by suggesting ”It’s only your diabetes doing its tricks”. I would think it is something like telling an angry woman “it’s just your hormones talking”. Tread carefully here. At high BG levels the most common symptoms are fatigue and frequent need for urination, but there are differences here too. For the first few years since Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dating And Online Personals At Diabeticdate.com

Diabetic Dating And Online Personals At Diabeticdate.com

dating service that caters to people that have diabetes and of course, any other singles interested in finding that special someone start meeting like minded individuals who are looking for friendship, dating and more! Show up on time. It is a first warning sign of disrespect for a woman. Smell nice and have a fresh breath (a little bit of aftershave will do the trick). Talking only about diabetes will bore her to death. She probably knows all about it. Ask questions, ask questions and even more questions. Keep her interested. Be funny but show her your serious side also. Don't call her or send emails 5 times a day. For her to be into you, she needs to be away from you for some time. Women love anticipation and surprises. Don't talk about your ex on first date, or talk about "sexual positions" that you prefer. Relax and just enjoy the night. He is probably stressed too thinking if this diabetic personals thing will work. One thing that will make him focus on you is nice, but not artificial smile. Talk about diabetic dating and how easy would it be to control each others diabetes. Don't open up too much at first date. An Enigmatic woman drives men wild. Use your body language as much as you can, especially if you really like him. Don't laugh histerically at every thing he says. He'll run away even before the dinner is over. Don't talk about your ex on first date, and how every man on the face of this earth is a liar. Continue reading >>

Expert Q&a

Expert Q&a

Ask the Endocrinologist/Diabetologist Lamont G. Weide, MD, PhD Please read the Disclaimer Question: How does diabetes effect the Black male? How does it effect the body, the family, the person? What types of diabetes can a person have? Answer: Minorities-native americans, black, hispanics-all have a greatly increased incidence of diabetes, mostly type 2. There are 2 major kinds of diabetes. type 1 diabetes is when the pancreas fails to make insulin. This places the person at risk for diabetic ketoacidosis. Without insulin persons with type 1 diabetes will die. These individuals usually require 30-40 units of insulin/day, although the amount varies. Although often thought of as young diabetes, type 1 can occur at any age. type 2 diabetes is related to insulin resistance. Most of these persons are overweight. The insulin that they make is not enough to deal with their blood sugars. Persons with type 2 diabetes may take pills or insulin. This also can occur at any age. In fact, this type of diabetes is occurring at an alarming rate in Native Americans. Complications can occur in both types of diabetes and is related to the degree of control. Question: Our daughter was ten years old when she was diagnosed with Diabetes. (She is not 21 and doing well, thank you!) We have two other children, now 19 and 14 (another daughter and a son)... What are the chances that they might develop Diabetes? (We know of no other diabetics in either my husband's family or mine except for type II in my Grandfather when he was in his 70's). Thank you! Katie Baldwin, Yankton, SD Answer: The chances of developing type 1 diabetes with one sibling with type 1 diabetes is increased to 3%. Without any type 1 diabetes the risk of getting type 1 diabetes is approximately 0.3%. With type 2 diabetes the ri Continue reading >>

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