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Dark Urine With Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Dark Urine And Diabetes | Diabetesteam

Dark Urine And Diabetes | Diabetesteam

How do you stop rehearsing past failures over and over in your head? I am a firm believer in forgetting the past. I just wish I could nip those times I find myself rehearsing my past mistakes in the bud before it spirals me into despair. My Therapist told me to allow the thought a moment but to let it pass, in a kind of meditation, my religious leaders tell me to take every thought captive, to fill my mind with scripture and prayer. My Naturopath says to exercise more and get plenty of rest. My doctor didn't describe ketones and what it means to have them in your urine. When I was diagnosed last year with Type 2 diabetes my doctor didn't inform me of what ketones were and what it meant to have them in your urine. While reading up on how to better manage my condition I came across the subject and am concerned with the issue. I believe I read there is a way to check for this yourself and would very much like to know how. I plan on discussing it with my doctor at my next appointment, but it isn't until read more Continue reading >>

5 Key Health Insights Your Urine Can Offer

5 Key Health Insights Your Urine Can Offer

Thinkstock Images via Getty Images Discussing bodily functions is a well-ingrained part of any physician’s vernacular. As a nephrologist, or kidney specialist, I often find myself talking about urine, because well, one of the main jobs of the kidneys is to filter wastes and toxins from our bloodstream. And all those wastes and toxins need somewhere to go once they have been removed from our systems. The result? Urine. On average, the kidneys filter 200 liters of blood each day. When the kidneys are healthy, this is quite an efficient process, so around 198 liters of blood return to the system. Usually, the kidneys are such experts at their jobs that many people don’t even think about them as they go about their regular business, eating, drinking, living and going to the bathroom (yes, that’s where the other two liters go). The kidneys’ complex filtration system is always striking a balance between keeping the minerals and chemicals your body needs to function efficiently and getting rid of the rest via the urine. I’m eager to help you get better acquainted with your kidneys, including their urine byproduct. Cue the PG-rated potty joke. I’ll leave that one and the resulting laugh it likely will elicit up to you, but it’s important to mention that no matter how you look at it — with your naked eyes, under the microscope, or (gasp!) not at all — urine contains valuable information about your health. So if you’re not already thinking about or looking at your urine, it’s time to start doing so. Don’t flush valuable health information down the toilet without first learning about 5 key health insights your urine can offer: The all clear. Literally and figuratively. The color or “concentration” of your urine can tell you whether you’re hydrated and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

If your glucose levels get out of control, it can lead to serious diabetes problems. Knowing the signs of these diabetes conditions can help you take quick action to resolve them. Diabetes complications can occur if you don't regulate your blood sugar (glucose) levels properly. Blood sugar is produced in your liver and muscles, and most of the food you eat is converted into blood sugar. This is your body's source of energy, but when your blood sugar gets too high, diabetes is the result. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which then carries blood sugar into your cells, where it’s stored and used for energy. When you develop insulin resistance, high levels of sugar build up in your blood instead of your cells and you start to experience signs and symptoms of diabetes. You may notice fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, infections that are slow to heal, pain and numbness in your feet or hands, and increased urination. For awhile, your pancreas will work to keep up with your body’s sugar demand by producing more insulin, but eventually it loses the ability to compensate and serious diabetes complications — including blindness, kidney failure, loss of circulation in your lower extremities, and heart disease — can develop. For most people with diabetes, the target blood sugar level is 70 to 130 mg/dL, but your doctor will work with you to pinpoint your individual target range. Your doctor can also help you learn what to eat and how to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. Joel Zonszein, MD, director of clinical diabetes at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, says it’s very important to work with and see your doctor regularly and to consult a diabetes educator. If your diabetes is well-controlled and you're monitoring your bloo Continue reading >>

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Sweet-smelling Urine: Causes, Symptoms, And When To See A Doctor

Urine may smell sweet if it contains extra glucose, which is a type of sugar. Diabetes is a common causes of this, but the smell of someone's urine can also change for other reasons. Urine can reveal a lot about someone's health. So while it might feel strange to discuss the odor of urine with a doctor, it is important that a person talks to a health provider if they notice a sudden change in the appearance or odor of their urine. In this article, we discuss the reasons for sweet- or fruity-smelling urine, symptoms, warning signs, and when to see a doctor. The look and odor of urine may be affected by a person's diet. Because urine helps the body get rid of waste, a person's diet and fluid intake can affect the way their urine looks and smells. If the odor of urine changes temporarily, this could be caused by something a person has eaten recently. For example, asparagus can give the urine an unusually strong odor. Some disorders, medications, and supplements may also affect the way urine smells. A person who notices a change in the smell of their urine should monitor their symptoms, and if they continue, should talk to a doctor. The most common reasons why urine may smell sweet include: Taking vitamin B6 supplements can change the smell of urine. A person with uncontrolled diabetes may have blood glucose levels that are dangerously high. The body tries to get rid of the extra glucose in the urine, and this can cause a sweet smell. People with sweet-smelling urine due to diabetes may notice other symptoms, including: This condition occurs when a person does not have enough insulin and usually, but not always, very high blood sugar levels. Insulin helps the body break down glucose to use for fuel. When the body cannot produce enough insulin to use glucose, it begins brea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Alternative names for diabetes insipidus Water diabetes; DI What is diabetes insipidus? Anti-diuretic hormone (also called vasopressin) is produced in the hypothalamus and then secreted by the pituitary gland into the bloodstream at the base of the brain. Anti-diuretic hormone is needed to stop the kidneys from producing too much urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus, cranial and nephrogenic. Cranial diabetes insipidus is a condition in which the hypothalamus does not produce enough anti-diuretic hormone. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a condition in which the kidneys fail to respond to anti-diuretic hormone. Both conditions mean that the kidneys are unable to retain water, leading to the passing of too much dilute urine (pale urine). This occurs even when the body is dehydrated and should be trying to save fluid by producing concentrated urine (dark urine). What causes diabetes insipidus? Usually diabetes insipidus is thought to have no clear, definable cause. This is known as idiopathic. However, some causes can be found: In cranial diabetes insipidus, the brain produces little or no anti-diuretic hormone. This can be as a result of: head injuries, pituitary tumours or neurosurgery (in these patients, diabetes insipidus may only be short-term) conditions that spread through the body (known as infiltrating) such as haemochromatosis and sarcoidosis infections such as tuberculosis genetic defects (very rare). In nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the brain is producing enough anti-diuretic hormone but the kidneys are insensitive to it and are unable to produce urine that is dark enough. The causes may be, for example, amyloidosis, polycystic kidneys, medications such as lithium and, very rarely, inherited genetic disorders. Gestational diabetes insipidus – t Continue reading >>

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Paula’s story Paula came to see mcomplaining that her urine smelt funny. She had been referred to through a friend who had diabetes, and who thought that I might be able to help Paula understand why her pee smelled funny. “My friend told me my urine smells like diabetes,” said Paula. “She said she had that same fruity smell when she got diagnosed.” Paula said her urine smelled like, “Sugar Smacks,” of all things. I suspected that Paula may have Type 2 Diabetes, but we needed to run some lab tests in order to confirm this suspicion We tested her urine using a urinalysis. She had high levels of glucose in her urine. After the urinalysis, we ran a random blood sugar, which detected her levels at 798 mg/dL. With the results at hand, Paula was diagnosed with diabetes. She had to start on insulin seemingly right off the bat, as other oral medications wouldn’t control her diabetes. She had weight to lose, and goals to reach. While she’s a work in progress,her urine no longer smells like Sugar Smacks. What exactly is urine made of ? Urine is a clear, yellow liquid produced by the body to handle the wastes from normal body metabolism. When nitrogenous by-products build up in the blood from cellular metabolism, it must be cleared from the bloodstream. In our bodies, some of our toxic waste from metabolism is excreted through perspiration as urea. The rest is handled by an intricate filter system that makes up the human urinary system. The kidneys work through processes of filtering waste, reabsorption, and tubular secretion. They make urine through this complex filtration process, after which then the urine goes through the ureters, which are tubes to the bladder. Once urine reaches the bladder, it is then dispelled out of the body through a tube called the “u Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes have an increase risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels can lead to decreased hydration in the body. Symptoms of dehydration can include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, tiredness and dark coloured urine. Often, feeling thirsty is the last symptom of dehydration and irritability and tiredess can come first. People are also considered to be dehydrated if they urinate less than four times a day. Symptoms of severe dehydration can include low blood pressure, a weak pulse or rapid heart rate and feeling confused. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. If you feel thirsty all the time it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, the kidneys will work to get rid some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. While the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing and this is why we tend to have increase thirst when blood sugar levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes? What Does It Mean For Your Kidneys?

Prediabetes describes the condition of someone who is on their way to developing diabetes. Before having diabetes, people usually have “pre-diabetes.” This is a new name for a condition in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. A person with prediabetes cannot handle sugar as well as they should. Even though diabetes is not full blown, high sugar levels in prediabetes can be causing problems throughout the body. One of the main organs that can be damaged is the kidney. People with prediabetes often have unrecognized chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to new research. In this large study, more than one third of the people with prediabetes were found to have two signs of kidney disease: protein in the urine (called albuminuria). Albuminuria is not normal. reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is a measure of how well the kidneys work; the eGFR tells the stage of kidney disease. In the people with prediabetes, the stage of chronic kidney disease was just as advanced as people with diabetes. Many people with either prediabetes or diabetes were found to have stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease. There are 5 stages of chronic kidney disease. When the disease reaches stage 5, the person will need kidney replacement therapy, either transplantation or dialysis. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that about one in four U.S. adults aged 20 years or older—or 57 million people—have pre—diabetes. Without patients and their doctors taking action, prediabetes is likely to become type 2 diabetes in 10 years or less. People with prediabetes should know that the long—term damage to their body—especially to the heart, kidneys and blood vessels — may alread Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

Most people have heard of the two main types of diabetes. But did you know the name has nothing to do with high blood sugar? It's a general term for any condition that causes your body to make a lot of urine. And that’s just what, diabetes insipidus does. This condition makes you extra thirsty. As a result, you pee -- a lot. Your body makes a substance called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). It’s produced in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus and stored in your pituitary gland. It tells your kidneys to hold onto water, which makes your urine more concentrated. When you’re thirsty or slightly dehydrated, ADH levels rise. Your kidneys reabsorb more water and put out concentrated urine. If you’ve had plenty to drink, ADH levels fall and what comes out is clear and dilute. When your body doesn’t make enough ADH, the condition is called central diabetes insipidus. If you make enough but your kidneys can't respond to it, you have nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In either form, the result is the same. Your kidneys can't retain water, so even if you’re dehydrated, they'll put out a lot of pale, or diluted urine. When your kidneys can’t conserve water, you’ll: Get really thirsty Pee a lot -- this is known as polyuria Some people get dehydrated. If you lose too much water, you could have: Lethargy Muscle pains Irritability If you have this condition, you’ll probably wind up at the doctor for help with your thirst and constant need for a bathroom. To diagnose you, the doctor will do a series of blood and urine tests that may take several hours. You’ll go without water the whole time, so you’ll get thirstier. Your doctor will measure the sodium in your blood and pee. He may give you an ADH substitute to see if your kidneys respond by concentrating your ur Continue reading >>

What Causes This Dark Urine?

What Causes This Dark Urine?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My urine is real dark and wondering if my kidneys are messed up? I'm taking 50 units of Lantas a day and between 18-more units of Novlog three times a day. Wondering if I need to drink more water? Robert, I can't speculate about this, but YOU WANT TO GET THIS CHECKED RIGHT AWAY, good luck and keep us posted. are you drinking enough fluids? Dark (or concentrated) urine is usually a sign of dehydration. Try drinking more water and if that's the case, then you should quickly see an improvement! Dark urine is a sign of dehydration. Have you checked your ketones??? It depends on what you define as dark. If it's still a yellowy colour but darker than normal, it is probably dehydration. If it's more brown, that could be a symptom of a variety of issues and needs to be dealt with by a doctor immediately. It depends on what you define as dark. If it's still a yellowy colour but darker than normal, it is probably dehydration. If it's more brown, that could be a symptom of a variety of issues and needs to be dealt with by a doctor immediately. Mine was brown for a day or so, after they started my IV for DKA. Before I got hospitalized it was clear. That's why I suggested testing ketones. Yellow on the other hand would be from flavonoids -- B vites or even coffee. I agree with above. It depends on what you consider dark. Some foods can cause discoloration. I had beets, and for a day or two it gave me reddish brown urine. My B-12 vitamins give it a darkish yellow color for about four hours or so after I take it. Dehydration as mentioned above, can make it turn dark as well. If this persists, and you do not Continue reading >>

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

Does The Drug That ‘fixed’ My Diabetes Have A Dark Side?

A while back, I wrote about how dapagliflozin revolutionised my glucose control. Almost overnight, I changed from a morbid and morbidly obese failing diabetic to a nearly new fifty-something with a rejuvenated lust for life. My HbA1c returned to normal levels and my retinopathy disappeared. I was advised to stop taking gliclazide as my glucose control seemed to be perfect, and I didn’t want to experience hypoglycaemia. I even stopped pricking my finger to measure my blood sugar. I felt my diabetes was behind me. I had also discovered a low-carb diet I could live with: bacon and eggs, kebabs, lamb chops and steaks with mustard, hummus and delicious cheeses, all accompanied by lots of salads in mayonnaise, and non-starchy veggies. Yumm! I lost three stone effortlessly. It became embarrassing how many people remarked on how well I looked, having been a sickly fat blighter for all the time before. I felt strong enough to take on a big project helping to plan and implement the regeneration of healthcare in my very rural locale. It involved lots of travelling to meet the public and speak frankly to them while thinking on my feet. I attended endless meetings and video conferences where I had to learn the tiresome new lingo of management-speak. All of this was done alongside my day and night job as a resident consultant in intensive care and anaesthesia. Before even six months were up, I began to feel a bit flakey. My memory and concentration were not good. I was having difficulty keeping up with the meetings. I was prone to emotional lability, most noticeably at home, and, most worrying of all, I was drinking too much alcohol to get to sleep. And then I noticed the smells of scrumpy and pear drops in my breath, sweat and urine. Not everyone can detect these smells. My blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Out of all the things in the world, and you pick up urine to write about. Is that what you’re thinking about? It may sound strange and bizarre to listen or read about urine, but boy it’s important down to every line. Urine is one thing that can offer great insight into the diabetic condition of the patient. We here would look into the correlation between diabetes and urine as part of our informative series. Perio Protect Treatment Non-surgical, Painless, Easy Method Using an FDA- Cleared Medical Device perioprotect.com Let’s head down and have a look as to how your urine says a lot about your health condition. Diabetes & Urine, A strange yet important relation It has long been practices that the urine color, consistency, and smell has been a benchmark for seeking the status of diabetes within the patient’s body. Up until the recent development of sophisticated machines that help gauge blood glucose levels, urine helped in finding the answers that one sought. But nonetheless, urine still hasn’t lost its place in today’s time of medical practices. Frequent Urination and Diabetes One of the major symptoms of diabetes is increased urination in the patient. The situation in which our body tends to urinate more than the normal is also known as polyuria. When a patient suffers from any type of diabetes, type 1 or type 2, the major symptom of the condition is the excessive passage of urine. In other words, you not only want to urinate more frequently but the volume also increases each time you urinate. In a healthy person, the volume of urine that passes is somewhere around 1-2 liters. However, in the case of diabetes, the patient passes around 3-4 liters of urine each day. Why Does Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination? We know understand the reasons as to why diabetes Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Urine Color?

How Does Diabetes Affect Urine Color?

Diabetes is a very complicated disease which gives rise to a host of problems which, in turn, leads to the abnormal urine color. Diabetes is known to increase the level of blood glucose in the body. Hence, most of the times when a diabetic passes urine, it smells of something rather sweet. This indicates that there is a presence of glucose in urine. Some of the reasons why diabetes can affect the urine color are as follows: Diabetes can lead to high levels of triglycerides due to the accumulation of fatty acids in the liver. This can darken the color of the urine. Besides, diabetes is known to cause several kidney related problems that can result in the urine getting a color that is not normal. Hence, if you sense the presence of sugar in your blood, you need to get it checked immediately. Continue reading >>

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

What Is Your Urine Trying To Tell You?

I realize that it may seem strange to be reading a posting about urine. However, last week I wrote about urinary tract infections (which we know are common both in women and in people who have diabetes), so I think this week’s topic is relevant. Also, the color, smell, and consistency of your urine can give you and your doctor helpful information about what might be going on in your body. Historically, looking at urine has been a way for doctors to gauge a person’s health, especially before other types of testing were available. If you’ve had diabetes for a long time or know someone who has, you’ll know that urine testing was a way to figure out how well controlled (or uncontrolled) a persons’ diabetes was — this was done in the days before blood glucose meters were available. Now, of course, we have more sophisticated tools to convey glucose information. But urine still has its place. What is urine? Urine is a waste product that contains breakdown products from food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics, environmental contaminants, and by-products from metabolism and bacteria. Amazingly, urine contains more than 3,000 compounds — much more than what’s found in other body fluids, like saliva or cerebrospinal fluid. The kidneys do a remarkable job of filtering and concentrating to help get these compounds out of the body (you can understand why keeping your kidneys healthy is so important). So, what is your urine telling you? If your urine is… Bright yellow. This may look alarming, especially when your urine seems to be glowing in the dark. But don’t worry — the bright yellow color is likely due to vitamins, specifically, B vitamins and beta carotene. Green or blue. Green or blue urine seems like something straight out of a science fiction movie, but the co Continue reading >>

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