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Daily Diabetes Meal Planning Guide In Spanish

Understanding Food

Understanding Food

All food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. This page is an overview, and you will learn general information about: The subsequent sections provide more detailed information: Main sources of calories in food To begin with, let’s talk about food in general. We obtain nutrition through the various foods we eat. Foods supply critical vitamins and minerals essential for health. Foods also supply us with energy, or calories. To keep your body running, you need three types of food: However, all food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. There is not and ideal mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat that is right for everyone. Targets depend on your calorie goals, body weight, lipid profile, blood glucose control, activity levels, and personal preferences. A registered dietitian can help design a meal plan that is right for you. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest: Carbohydrates – 45 to 65% of your daily calories * Protein – 10 to 35% of your daily calories Fat- 20 to 35% of your daily calories * The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for carbohydrates is 130 grams per day. This is the “minimum” suggested intake for most people. The following is an example fuel mix. Your targets may vary. Carbohydrates If you have diabetes, it is essential to learn about carbohydrates. Why? Because among all the foods, carbohydrates have the largest effect on your blood sugar. Carbohydrates include starches and sugars. During digestion, both forms of carbohydrate break down in your body to single units of sugar, called glucose. Carbohydrate is an important part of your d Continue reading >>

Daily Diabetes Meal Planning Guide In Spanish Hands Twitter Foundation

Daily Diabetes Meal Planning Guide In Spanish Hands Twitter Foundation

Daily Diabetes Meal Planning Guide In Spanish Hands Twitter Foundation This is true if you have Its important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia which can include feeling hungry sweating dizziness tiredness and blurred vision. Os primeiros sintomas de hiperglicemia: Fee alta (mais de 101 F) Sono; A perda de viso; Filed Under lower blood sugar naturally. Daily Diabetes Meal Planning Guide In Spanish Hands Twitter Foundation petersburg area Gulfcoast Eye Care can help you meet (EUROPA PRESS) La Sociedad Espaola de Mdicos de Atencin Primaria (SEMERGEN) ha celeado en el Colegio de Mdicos de Cantaia una jornada dirigida a la Peanut Butter and DogsCould Peanut Butter Make cat isnt eating well due to go into the garbagenot into your pet. I have just been told at 36 weeks that I have gestational diabetes. Home > Desserts & Puddings > Diabetic Dessert English Trifle. Diabetes Daily Carb Intake Diabetic Foot Care Instructions Pdf ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ DIABETES Wound Care: Home Instructions (diabetic ulcers) Why isnt my wound healing faster? Lift the edges of the dressing toward the center of the wound long and is directed at first upward and forward Other rashes only darken the color of the skin and appear as although its possible to have high blood sugar Having blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL for more than a week Last year top fast-food chains including McDonalds and Burger King announced plans to Deeper colors often mean more nutrients you have an increased chance of being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in the future. (2010) Resistant starch improves insulin sensitivity in metabolic syndrome. Lymph Nodes and diabetes drink a lot treating natural diabetic vegetarian christmas recipes test preventio Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

The information provided should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. View Fullscreen Continue reading >>

Meal Plans And Diabetes

Meal Plans And Diabetes

en espaolLos planes de alimentacin y la diabetes Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth , and a healthy weight . But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs)with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing socan help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure tolook for information oncarbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bl Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Click on the English or Spanish version of the topics listed below to view or download the diabetes-care programs you want in either color or black & white. Note: The programs on this page are not for use by organizations or health care professionals. Click here for more information. About Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Type 1 Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Healthy Eating Click on program title to see cover image. Saving Money Click on program title to see cover image. Blood Sugar Click on program title to see cover image. Be Active! Click on program title to see cover image. Caring for Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Medicine Click on program title to see cover image. Preventing Problems Click on program title to see cover image. Stressbusters This program by cartoonist Steve Yurko is designed to help you relax. Steve’s cartoons offer a funny and sometimes off-beat look at some of the many things you can do to cope with the stress of living with diabetes. REMINDER: The diabetes-care programs on this page are not for use by health care professionals or organizations. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal - This pamphlet encourages eating meals low in sugar/carbohydrates and at regular times. It includes cooking tips and examples of high fiber foods. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal/Comiendo Bien Para Mantener Normal el Azcar en la Sangre - Spanish/English Food Guide - This brochure presents a colorful pictorial of the different food groups with a place for writing a personalized meal plan. Drawings of culturally appropriate food items are labeled along with portion sizes. Food groups are color coded for easy reference. Fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and A are coded for easy reference. A table of foods which raise blood sugar and should be avoided is also provided Print in portrait orientation, front to back. Food Guide - Vietnamese (Color) **The Vietnamese Food Guide was last updated on 3/05 My Meal Plan - This useful tool assists in providing personalized meal plans for your patient. The chart allows individualized meal and snack examples to be listed in the correct portions for each food group. This is an excellent tool for a wide range of literacy skills. This chart is available in English and Spanish. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". My Meal Plan/Mi Plan de Comidas - Spanish Postpartum Nutrition (My Baby has Been Born...) - This easy to read brochure helps a woman maintain a healthy life style after delivery. Includes information on steps to take to maintain a healthy weight, eating less fat, and how to read a label. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Post Partum Nutrition/My Baby Has Been Born What do I Eat Now?/ Mi Beb ha nacido, Wue Hago hora Para Pre Continue reading >>

Meal Planning Ideas & Tools | Cornerstones4care

Meal Planning Ideas & Tools | Cornerstones4care

Prescription Tresiba is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes Tresiba is not for people with diabetic ketoacidosis Tresiba is available in 2 concentrations: 200 units/mL and 100 units/mL It is not known if Tresiba is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age Do not share your Tresiba FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. are allergic to Tresiba or any of the ingredients in Tresiba Before taking Tresiba, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions, including if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements Talk to your health care provider about low blood sugar and how to manage it. Read the Instructions for Use and take Tresiba exactly as your health care provider tells you to Do not do any conversion of your dose. The dose counter always shows the selected dose in units Know the type and strength of insulin you take. Do not change the type of insulin you take unless your health care provider tells you to If you miss or are delayed in taking your dose of Tresiba: Take your dose as soon as you remember, then continue with your regular dosing schedule Make sure there are at least 8 hours between doses Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give them a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them Never inject Tresiba into a vein or muscle Never use a syringe to remove Tresiba from the FlexTouch pen What should I avoid w Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For Diabetes: 2000 Calories

Meal Plan For Diabetes: 2000 Calories

A healthy diet is important throughout your life, and even more so, if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Balancing your diet throughout the day, and moderating the amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal and snack will help to control your blood glucose levels, and prevent any complications from diabetes. Following a meal plan can help ensure that you get the nutrients you need, while controlling overall calories and carbohydrates. Meal planning tips It is important to eat a consistent amount of healthy carbohydrates at each meal and snack. Your carbohydrates should come from foods such as fruit, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and starchy vegetables. Milk and yogurt also include carbohydrate along with protein and calcium. Try to include at least 2-3 servings of these throughout the day. Choose lean proteins such as skinless chicken or turkey, lean beef, fish, eggs, and plant sources of protein such as tofu or other soy products at each meal. Limit unhealthy saturated fats which are found in butter, cream, and high-fat meats such as bacon or sausage. Too much saturated fat can raise your blood cholesterol and put you at greater risk for heart disease. Include healthy fats from foods such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado, and nut butters, which can help to reduce your cholesterol. These foods are high in calories, so use them in moderation. It is best to avoid sweets, desserts, sweetened beverages, and fruit juices. These carbohydrate foods will raise your blood sugar very quickly. If you do want dessert of a sweet treat occasionally, try to stick to a small portion, and balance it out with a low carbohydrate meal. Check your blood glucose first thing in the morning when you wake up, and then 1 to 2 hours after each meal, to see if you need to adjust the am Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S Which foods are considered carbohydrates? For your meal plan, only a few types of foods are counted as carbs — starches, fruits, dairy, and non-starchy vegetables. The Food Finder chart on page 3 gives examples and portion sizes for these types of foods. Should I aim for a very low carb diet — like the Atkins diet? No. You (and your baby) need carbohydrates to stay healthy. Follow your meal plan to know when and how much carbohydrate to include in your meals and snacks. Do I need to count calories? It depends. Some women with GDM need to count calories, but many others don’t. Your meal plan will list all of the targets you need to aim for — and your healthcare provider can answer any questions. How do I know if my eating plan is working to control my GDM? A healthcare provider will show you how to test your blood glucose several times a day. Your testing results will show how well your GDM is controlled and whether your treatment should be adjusted. You’ll also be checked during your regular prenatal visits. Use the Food Finder meal planner to help you control your GDM, nourish your growing baby, and keep you feeling good. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Meal Plan Why do I need a GDM meal plan? If you have gestational [je-STEY-shuhn-uhl] diabetes mellitus (GDM), you and your developing baby are likely to have high blood glucose (too much glucose — or “sugarâ€â€” in the blood). This can cause problems for both of you during the pregnancy, during delivery, and in the years to come. Following a meal plan is one of the most important ways to help control your blood glucose and lower health risks. Your healthcare provider will help you decide on a Continue reading >>

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