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Cymbalta Diabetes

Cymbalta Approved For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Pain

Cymbalta Approved For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Pain

Cymbalta approved for diabetic peripheral neuropathy pain The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eli Lilly's Cymbalta , a balanced and potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Cymbalta is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for pain caused by diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Cymbalta comes in a capsule and can be taken once a day. The recommended daily dose for Cymbalta is 60 mg. Cymbalta has not been studied in children, and therefore Lilly discourages its use in those under 18. In addition to depression and pain caused by diabetic peripheral neuropathy, duloxetine hydrochloride, the active ingredient in Cymbalta, also has been approved in Europe for the treatment of moderate to severe stress urinary incontinence, another condition believed to respond to treatment that affects serotonin and norepinephrine levels. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a problem associated with long standing diabetes or poor glucose control. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, affecting up to 62% of Americans with diabetes. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can manifest in a variety of ways but is usually characterized by burning, tingling, and numbing sensations beginning in the feet, and later affecting the legs and/or hands. The safety and effectiveness of Cymbalta were established in two randomized, controlled studies of approximately 1074 patients. Although the mechanism of action is unknown, patients treated with Cymbalta reported a greater decrease in pain compared to placebo. In these trials, 58 percent of patients treated with Cymbalta reported at least a 30 percent sustained reduction in pain. In comparison, 34 percent of patients treated with placebo reported this magnitude of sustained pain reduction. Kidney st Continue reading >>

Lyrica And Cymbalta Advised For Diabetic Neuropathy

Lyrica And Cymbalta Advised For Diabetic Neuropathy

New guidelines by the American Diabetes Association for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy strongly discourage the use of opioids to treat nerve pain, while recommending pregabalin (Lyrica) and duloxetine (Cymbalta). Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes and over half have some form of neuropathy, which often causes a painful stinging or burning sensation in the hands or feet. Nerve pain is often the first symptom that prompts people to seek medical care before getting a diabetes diagnosis. Researchers at the University of Michigan led a group of internationally recognized endocrinologists and neurologists, and teamed up with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) to craft a new position statement on the prevention, treatment and management of neuropathy. The ADA last released a statement on diabetic neuropathy in 2005. "Our goal was to update the document so that it not only had the most up-to-date evidence, but also was easy to understand and relevant for primary care physicians," said lead author Rodica Pop-Busui, MD, a professor of internal medicine at Michigan Medicine Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes . "Treatment of neuropathy pain is specifically relevant because, unfortunately, there has been much overprescribing of narcotics for neuropathic pain." Although opioids like oxycodone and tramadol are effective in relieving nerve pain, they are not recommended by the ADA as a first, second or even a third-line treatment. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of opioids in the treatment of neuropathic pain, there is a high risk of addiction, abuse, sedation, and other complications and psychosocial issues even with short-term opioid use. For these reasons, opioids are not recommended in the treatment of painful DSPN (distal Continue reading >>

The Curse Of Cymbalta

The Curse Of Cymbalta

It was supposed to replace Prozac profits when the patent expired in 2001 and cash in on the national love affair with antidepressants. But Eli Lilly & Co.’s Cymbalta (duloxetine) seemed cursed from the start. The first antidepressant to be introduced since FDA investigations into suicide/antidepressant links, Cymbalta itself was marred with suicides before it was approved. Five occurred during Cymbalta clinical trials including previously healthy volunteer Traci Johnson who hung herself in Lilly’s Indiana University Medical School lab in 2004. “Their posturing was offensive,” said the Rev. Joel Barnaby, spokesman for Traci Johnson’s family upon hearing Lilly would not delay the drug’s planned introduction. “They were saying that this little death certainly should not defame our study or, God forbid, make us miss a deadline for FDA approval.” Nor was Traci, “in a depressed state of mind or had a spirit wounded so much that she gave up on life,” Mr. Barnaby said. Despite $208 million in sales in its first eight months of marketing thanks to auto suggestive “Depression Hurts” television ads and do-you-have-this-disease? symptom checklists on its web site, Cymbalta’s bad buzz didn’t go away. A year after Cymbalta hit drug store shelves it was indicted for causing more than twice the rate of suicide attempts in women prescribed the drug for stress urinary incontinence–a use not approved in the US–according to the FDA. Last May, the FDA ordered Lilly to add a black box to Cymbalta warning about suicides and antidepressants in young adults. And in October Lilly was told to “immediately cease” its Cymbalta campaign for diabetic nerve pain–an approve use–which promises “significantly less pain interference with overall functioning.” I Continue reading >>

Cymbalta Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Cymbalta Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Duloxetine is used to treat depression and anxiety . In addition, duloxetine is used to help relieve nerve pain ( peripheral neuropathy ) in people with diabetes or ongoing pain due to medical conditions such as arthritis , chronic back pain , or fibromyalgia (a condition that causes widespread pain). Duloxetine may improve your mood, sleep , appetite, and energy level, and decrease nervousness. It can also decrease pain due to certain medical conditions. Duloxetine is known as a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). This medication works by helping to restore the balance of certain natural substances (serotonin and norepinephrine) in the brain . Read the Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using duloxetine and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1 or 2 times a day with or without food. If you have nausea , it may help to take this drug with food. Swallow the capsule whole. Do not crush or chew the capsule or mix the contents with food or liquid. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. The dosage is based on your age, medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce your risk of side effects, your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day. It is important to continue taking this medication as prescribed even if you feel well. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Some cond Continue reading >>

Duloxetine (cymbalta), Antidepressant, Side Effects, Dosing, Uses

Duloxetine (cymbalta), Antidepressant, Side Effects, Dosing, Uses

What else should I know about duloxetine? What is duloxetine, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Duloxetine is a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants used for treating depression , anxiety disorder , and pain . Other drugs in this class include milnacipran ( Savella ), venlafaxine ( Effexor ), and desvenlafaxine ( Pristiq ). Duloxetine affects neurotransmitters, the chemicals that nerves within the brain make and release in order to communicate with one another. Neurotransmitters either travel across the space between nerves and attach to receptors on the surface of nearby nerves or they attach to receptors on the surface of the nerves that produced them, to be taken up by the nerve and released again (a process referred to as re-uptake). Many experts believe that an imbalance among neurotransmitters is the cause of depression as well as other psychiatric disorders. Serotonin and norepinephrine are two neurotransmitters released by nerves in the brain. Duloxetine works by preventing the reuptake of serotonin and epinephrine by nerves after they have been released. Since uptake is an important mechanism for removing released neurotransmitters and terminating their actions on adjacent nerves, the reduced uptake caused by duloxetine increases the effect of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. The mechanism responsible for its effectiveness treating pain is not known but also is thought to involve its effects on serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. Duloxetine was approved by the FDA in August 2004. Duloxetine is approved for treating the following conditions: The dose of duloxetine should be gradually reduced when therapy is discontinued to prevent symptoms of withdrawal. Antidepressants increased the risk of Continue reading >>

Cymbalta Side Effects

Cymbalta Side Effects

Cymbalta is the brand name for duloxetine, an antidepressant prescribed to treat the symptoms of depression. In addition to depression, doctors can prescribe Cymbalta to treat anxiety that lasts for at least six months, pain from diabetic nerve damage, fibromyalgia, and long-term muscle or bone pain. Cymbalta is in a class of medications called serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). It works by increasing the levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine, which help regulate mood and may block pain signals traveling through the brain. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved duloxetine in 2004 under the brand name Cymbalta for the Lilly drug company. In 2013, the FDA announced that it had approved generic versions of duloxetine for several drug companies. Cymbalta could also help ease pain associated with osteoarthritis, according to a study published in the International Journal of Clinical Practice in 2012. The researchers noted that use of Cymbalta could result in fewer side effects than the drugs traditionally used for the condition, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, which can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding, and opioids like morphine, which often lead to constipation. They concluded that doctors may consider adding antidepressants, such as Cymbalta to the treatment regimens for patients with osteoarthritis. Cymbalta Suicide Warnings The FDA requires that Cymbalta carry a black-box warning about the risk of suicide among people who use the antidepressant. Cymbalta may increase the risk for suicidal thoughts or behaviors if you are 24 years old or younger. Doctors usually do not prescribe Cymbalta for anyone younger than 18. The risk is greatest when first starting treatment or increasing the dose of Cymb Continue reading >>

How Can Cymbalta Fight Diabetic Neuropathy Nerve Pain?

How Can Cymbalta Fight Diabetic Neuropathy Nerve Pain?

How Can Cymbalta Fight Diabetic Neuropathy Nerve Pain? Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook Cymbalta is an SSRI antidepressant which was being prescribed off label to diabetes patients who were suffering from diabetes nerve pain known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The FDA approved Cymbalta for treatment of diabetes neuropathy but does Cymbaltas pros outweigh its cons? Cymbalta is a dual re-uptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine. It is this characteristic that causes Cymbalta to drastically reduce pain. I have been checking out some message boards in which people who began taking Cymbalta saw a great improvement in their pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. If youve never had nerve pain, you just cant imagine how painful it is. Pretty much nothing gives you relief. That is why Cymbalta is becoming so popular to treat the pain. Not only does Cymbalta relieve some of the nerve pain associated with the diabetic peripheral neuropathy but since it is an antidepressant it is also providing a better quality of life to those suffering from both pain and depression. The risk of depression is raised in diabetes patients. Think your diabetes is difficult to manage? Meet Calvin. A 10 year old boy with a deep enthusiasm for life. But every day is a constant battle against an enemy that will not relent; an enemy that requires careful vigilance and treatment; an enemy that science can not as yetdefeat. After reading up on the subject of Cymbalta for diabetes peripheral neuropathy I started coming across a lot of message boards containing messages from diabetes patients who were in the process of weening off of Cymbalta because it was no longer working for their pain. Why were they needing to ween off of Cymbalta? Because the Cymbalta withdrawal is Continue reading >>

Cymbalta Causes Rise In Blood Sugar:(

Cymbalta Causes Rise In Blood Sugar:(

Posted by Jay_Bravest_Face on April 6, 2008, at 22:59:12 Well, my suspicions where true. Just when I seemed to be doing good on Cymbalta, my blood sugar reading where getting all out of control. I didnt know what it was at first, but I just had a gut feeling it might be one of my meds. It seemed that after I started Cymbalta, the glucose thing became bad. So, I got around to my Cymbalta, and stopped taking it for a few days. Ta-da. Blood sugar lowers to between 7 and 10 (That is Canadian..I dont know how Americans measure it.) They say, try for between 5-8, but 5-10 two hours after eating is supposedly acceptable. So, then the next morning I take my Cymbalta dose, and within 3-4 hours, my reading is up to 24!!! I jumped up at work, took two extra diabetes pills, and headed for the emergency room. The doctor looked Cymbalta up in our CPS (Canadas version of the PDR) and yep, buried in there, rise in blood sugar was listed close to the top of the side-effects. Now, the reason I also bring this up is that the Cymbalta drug company here in Canada, Lilly, published their own little bit of research on this issue. They came to the conclusion that Cymbalta had a slight effect on rising blood sugar. Now, do yall remember that little pill called Zyprexa? Yes, of course you do. They kept some of its very damning research locked away for years, that even the FDA (the government) couldnt get a hold of! Could you imagine if they had published that story about the one poor guy in the Zyprexa trials, who didnt even have diabetes, and when he started Zyprexa, his blood sugar shot up to 130 (Canadian) or something like that, and of course the poor guy died as a result. I am not knocking Zyprexa or Cymbaltathey are good medications, but as someone with type 2 diabetes, likely brought on Continue reading >>

Cymbalta (duloxetine Hcl) Drug Overview And Uses For Patients And Caregivers At Rxlist

Cymbalta (duloxetine Hcl) Drug Overview And Uses For Patients And Caregivers At Rxlist

almotriptan, frovatriptan, sumatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, or zolmitriptan; or any other antidepressant such as desipramine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and others. This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with duloxetine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you. Your pharmacist can provide more information about duloxetine. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthc Continue reading >>

Cymbalta (duloxetine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Cymbalta (duloxetine) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

40-60 mg/day PO initially (in single daily dose or divided q12hr for 1 week if patient needs to adjust to therapy) Titrate dose in increments of 30 mg/day over 1 week as tolerated Target dosage: 60 mg/day PO (in single daily dose or divided q12hr); not to exceed 120 mg/day (safety of dosages >120 mg/day has not been evaluated) 60 mg/day PO initially (in single daily dose or divided q12hr); consider lowering dosage if tolerability is concern Target dosage: 60 mg/day PO; not to exceed 60 mg/day 60 mg/day PO initially (in single daily dose or divided q12hr); may be increased in increments of 30 mg/day if tolerability is concern Target dosage: 60 mg/day PO; not to exceed 120 mg/day 30 mg/day PO initially for 1 week to allow for therapy adjustment Target dosage: 60 mg/day PO; not to exceed 60 mg/day; no additional benefit shown by doses > 60 mig in clinical trials Treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain, including discomfort from osteoarthritis and chronic lower back pain 30 mg/day PO initially for 1 week to allow for therapy adjustment Target dosage: 60 mg/day PO; not to exceed 60 mg/day Severe renal impairment (CrCl <30 mL/min) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD): Use not recommended Hepatic impairment: Use not recommended, because of risk of hepatic injury Dosages 60 mg/day have not been shown to offer additional benefits Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder: Acute episodes often necessitate several months of sustained therapy Diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: Efficacy for >12 weeks has not been studied; if diabetes is complicated by renal disease, consider lower starting dosage with gradual increase to effective dosage Fibromyalgia: Efficacy for 12 weeks has not been studied; continue treatment on basis of individual patient response Chronic mu Continue reading >>

Cymbalta For Diabetic Nerve Pain

Cymbalta For Diabetic Nerve Pain

I complained to my doctor about my feet and he prescribed Cymbalta. I have been reading the insert that came with the medication and it looks like this drug is more for depression and the diabetic nerve pain stuff is one of the good side effects. The list of other side effects is very long and I don't want any of them! I did a search here for Cymbalta and found nothing. Is anyone here using Cymbalta for diabetic nerve pain and what are your results? There are no drugs for neuropathic pain specifically, this is one of the substitutes, a SSRI reuptake inhibitor, it basically increases the amount of serotonin in the brain. 5-HTP increases serotonin as well without the side effects, it's been a long time since I've had any pain with my neuropatic feet even though I do take this stuff from time to time, in theory it might help, as would GABA, with the other med that is given for this, an anti epileptic, increases. Looking back on my case, I used to think that benfotiamine may be responsible for my big improvement with this but I ran out quite some time ago and continue to get better off it, it's probably the antioxidants I take, which makes sense since this disease is an overoxidation of your nerves, and the body attempts to repair this all the time but with too much oxidation it doesn't stand a chance. The thing that has seemed to help me in particular is 1200 IU of mixed tocopherol E, a lot of us don't get enough and if you just take the standard E, which is just alpha, well that can actually be harmful, as the body mostly uses beta and too much alpha can deplete beta even more. ...I am convinced the leg pain is from statins, which I quit taking a several months ago. But I had been taking them for many years... When I started exercising (just a walk around the block at fi Continue reading >>

Cymbalta For Depression?

Cymbalta For Depression?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Have been in a depressive mood for the past 2 years. Did a general health checkup which ruled out any serious causes. My HBA1C has been averaging at 6,6. So with the general health fine, the conclusion is that it must be my fluctuating blood sugar levels. I'm on a low-carb diet as well. Feel tired all the time, not motivated to do anything, no emotions etc. I got described Cymbalta Duloxetine 30 mg, 1 tablet per day. As this antidepressant worked for me in the past, I'm considering trying it again for a short period of time to get me back on track. Has anyone got experiences of antidepressants such as Cymbalta to combat Depressive Diabetic periods? Have been in a depressive mood for the past 2 years. Did a general health checkup which ruled out any serious causes. My HBA1C has been averaging at 6,6. So with the general health fine, the conclusion is that it must be my fluctuating blood sugar levels. I'm on a low-carb diet as well. Feel tired all the time, not motivated to do anything, no emotions etc. I got described Cymbalta Duloxetine 30 mg, 1 tablet per day. As this antidepressant worked for me in the past, I'm considering trying it again for a short period of time to get me back on track. Has anyone got experiences of antidepressants such as Cymbalta to combat Depressive Diabetic periods? yes actually it worked fantastic for me in 4-5 years Cymbalta which is a SNRI, It gave me much more energy and I even lost about 10 kg of my overweight....... then suddenly I started Continue reading >>

Duloxetine Treatment And Glycemic Controls In Patients With Diagnoses Other Than Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A Meta-analysis.

Duloxetine Treatment And Glycemic Controls In Patients With Diagnoses Other Than Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A Meta-analysis.

Curr Med Res Opin. 2010 Nov;26(11):2579-88. doi: 10.1185/03007991003769241. Epub 2010 Sep 27. Duloxetine treatment and glycemic controls in patients with diagnoses other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: a meta-analysis. Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Siena, Italy. Mood disorders are often associated with poor glycemic control, and antidepressant treatments for mood and pain disorders can alter plasma glucose levels in patients with diabetes. A previous meta-analysis from three studies showed that duloxetine modestly increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA(1c) levels in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). This meta-analysis examined whether there were any short- and long-term effects of duloxetine (20-120 mg/day) on glycemic control in patients with diagnoses other than DPNP. Short-term data (9-27 weeks): seven studies of duloxetine in general anxiety disorder, fibromyalgia, and chronic lower back pain (CLBP). Long-term data: 41-week, uncontrolled extension of the short-term CLBP study and 52-week study in patients with recurrence of major depressive disorder. Baseline-to-endpoint changes in FPG and HbA(1c) levels. In short-term studies, patients were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 1098) or duloxetine (n = 1563). Mean baseline-to-endpoint changes in FPG and HbA(1c) did not significantly differ in duloxetine-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients. In the 41-week study (n = 181), duloxetine-treated patients experienced a small but significant within-group baseline-to-endpoint increase in HbA(1c) (mean change = 0.1%; p < 0.001). This result was in contrast to absence of effect on mean baseline-to-endpoint within-group changes in FPG (p = 0.326) in that study, and to absence of between-treatment changes in FPG Continue reading >>

Cymbalta Treatment Of Neuropathic Pain May Affect Glycemic Control

Cymbalta Treatment Of Neuropathic Pain May Affect Glycemic Control

Home / Specialties / Neuropathy & Pain / Cymbalta Treatment of Neuropathic Pain May Affect Glycemic Control Cymbalta Treatment of Neuropathic Pain May Affect Glycemic Control Duloxetine was linked with modest changes in glycemia in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP), according to the results of 3 randomized trials. "The clinical trials of duloxetine for DPNP provide a large database to evaluate potential metabolic effects of duloxetine in patients with diabetes. The current study examined pooled data from both short- and long-term studies to assess changes in weight, glycemia, and plasma lipids and to test for relationships between metabolic changes and baseline clinical factors, as well as the analgesic response to duloxetine treatment." The investigators pooled data from 3 similarly designed clinical trials in which adults with diabetes and DPNP (n = 1024) were randomized to 60 mg duloxetine once daily, 60 mg twice daily, or placebo for 12 weeks. After this phase, 867 subjects were re-randomized to 60 mg of duloxetine twice daily or to routine care for an additional 52 weeks. Outcome measures included mean changes in fasting plasma glucose (FGP), lipids, and weight, and regression and subgroup analyses were used to identify relationships between metabolic measures and demographic, clinical, and electrophysiologic parameters. Duloxetine treatment was associated with modest increases in FGP at 12 and 52 weeks (0.50 and 0.67 mmol/L, respectively). Although glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels did not increase in placebo-controlled studies, there was a greater increase compared with routine care in long-term studies (0.52% vs 0.19%). Short-term duloxetine treatment was associated with mean weight loss of -1.03 kg (P < .001 vs placebo). However, longe Continue reading >>

Review Of Duloxetine In The Management Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

Review Of Duloxetine In The Management Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

Review of duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain 1Mercy Health Research Ryan Headache Center, St. Louis, MO, USA 2Department of Family Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA Correspondence: Timothy Smith Mercy Health Research and Ryan Headache Center, 12680 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63141, USA Tel +1 314 251 8890 Email [email protected] Copyright 2007 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Duloxetine is a balanced selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) which, in 2004, became the first agent to receive regulatory approval for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy in the US. This compound has no other significant receptor or channel activities other than the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition mechanisms and works to diminish or control the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Duloxetine has no known neuroprotective or other effects which prevent the development of neuropathy in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the background of painful diabetic neuropathy, the pharmacology of duloxetine, and its safety and efficacy in clinical trials and long-term observations. The authors will also comment on its use in clinical practice. Results from controlled clinical trials reveal that duloxetine administered at 60 mg qd or 60 mg bid is efficacious in treating diabetic neuropathic pain relative to placebo. Positive treatment outcomes are also seen for other measures of pain and quality of life. A minor but statistically significant increase in blood glucose compared with placebo treated patients has been observed in controlled clinical trials. Otherwise, controlled and open-la Continue reading >>

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