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Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Here's Exactly What I Ate To Cure My Type 2 Diabetes & High Cholesterol

Mary Jenkins is 51 and lives in Kanab, Utah. Last December, before starting her new diet, she weighed 225 pounds. She has since lost 50 pounds—and the weight is still coming off. This is her story. I was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, so I lived off a Southern-fried diet for most of my life. As a result, I had extremely high blood pressure for over 30 years. I tried every eating plan out there to get it under control: low-carb diets, high-protein diets—all that stuff. None of it worked for me. I was still obese, and my cholesterol levels didn’t improve. We hope you enjoy the products we're recommending as much as we do! Just so you know, Prevention may get a share of sales from the links on this page. (Discover the ONE simple, natural solution that can help you reverse chronic inflammation and heal more than 45 diseases. Try The Whole Body Cure today!) Then two years ago, my doctor ordered an A1C test. He had a hunch I may have type 2 diabetes as a result of my weight. My score was a seven, which meant his suspicions were correct. (A normal A1C level is below 5.7. ) It got worse: Because I’ve had high blood pressure for so long, he said I could have long-term organ damage now that I also had diabetes. You’d think at that point, he would have sat me down and talked to me about how I could improve my diet, but he didn’t. He just said something like, “Watch your carbs and exercise.” That was it. So I basically kept living as I had before. My motivation Then my doctor moved away, and I found another doctor in a larger town nearby. My new physician told me that I needed to go on metformin (the generic name for a drug used to treat high blood sugar levels) immediately. He also told me that I should ramp up my exercise routine. So last year, I started hikin Continue reading >>

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Is There A Diabetes Cure?

Everyone at Diabetes Daily is extremely excited for the day when diabetes is cured. We interview the greatest researchers in the world and are amazing by the continuous advances in understanding diabetes. In this section, we will look at our progress in curing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. You can also check out the many posts in our blog about the hunt for a diabetes cure. Is There a Type 2 Diabetes Cure? The short answer is: No. In reality, the answer is a little more complicated and depends upon how you define the word cure. There is currently no known treatment that will permanently eliminate type 2 diabetes. However, there are treatments that can cause diabetes to go into remission, often for very long periods of time. Those treatments include weight loss surgery and, in some circumstances, aggressive treatment with either diet, exercise and weight loss. At Diabetes Daily, we prefer using the word remission over cure because far too often the state of diabetes returns even with people’s best efforts. Regardless of the definition of a cure, finding a way to live with little to know highs or lows is a worthwhile endeavor. Long-term studies show that even a few years of great blood sugars significantly reduces your long-term risk of complications. A majority of people who undergo weight loss surgery experience diabetes remission. As the first major long-term studies are completed, we are discovering that many people do eventually relapse and the benefits are not permanent. In an interview with diaTribe, Dr. David Cummings shares the current state of research: A substantial proportion of people who experience type 2 diabetes remission after gastric bypass eventually have relapse of the disease down the road. I feel the best study of this was done by my co-author on CRO Continue reading >>

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs in Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope According to recent research , we're not entirely sure how many diseases the label 'diabetes' covers. But no matter what causes our bodies to struggle with their blood sugar levels, it's a serious condition that requires daily care. Scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Insulin producing implants made from stem cells Clinical trials began last year for testing for ViaCyte's PEC-Direct device ; a credit-card sized implant containing insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells. Previous research had shown the implants could mature and function inside patients. Together with a cohort of volunteers who started testing in January, the new research should tell us soon whether the technology can help people with type-1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. A drug on the World Health Organisation's list of essential drugs could have another purpose ; blocking a molecule implemented in the autoimmune response that can give rise to type-1 diabetes. Called methyldopa, the compound already has an important job treating high blood pressure in pregnant women and children. It's left to be seen if it could help reduce the incidence of diabetes in some way, but the fact it's already being used - rather than being stuck in the lab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cure

Diabetes Cure

Tweet Cures for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes have not yet been discovered, but progress is being made to prospectively cure type 1 diabetes in this generation. As studies continue, the root causes and mechanism behind both forms of the disease are becoming more clearly understood all the time. People with type 2 diabetes can go into remission, but while a cure is still elusive for type 1 diabetes, research from major angles is contributing towards a potential cure. Type 1 diabetes cure Researchers are beginning to get excited again that a cure or near-cure treatment could come as early as within the next decade or two. A diabetes vaccine diabetes vaccine is consistently being investigated to provide a true biological cure for type 1 diabetes. The aim is for a vaccine to be created that stops the immune system from attacking the body's insulin-producing beta cells. Another cure prospect gaining momentum is islet cell encapsulation, with stem cells used to create insulin-producing cells that can work without immune system interference. Type 1 diabetes vaccine Research into a diabetes vaccine is being made on several fronts, with Selecta Bioscience, a clinical bioscience company, developing a Synthetic Vaccine Particle (SVP) as an immunotherapy for type 1 diabetes. The vaccine is expected to reprogram the immune system to prevent inflammatory responses to insulin cells, with Selecta currently trialling SVP on mice courtesy of funding from JRDF, a leading global organisation funding type 1 diabetes research. Elsewhere, the Faustman Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital is currently leading a human clinical trial program to test the efficiency of their Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Positive results have already been reported from their Phase I study. An Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and causes many serious health problems if not managed well. The health impacts of diabetes can be limited, but can it ever be "cured"? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that develops when the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. This means people with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin. In those with type 2 diabetes, there is a decreased sensitivity to insulin and the body does not make or use as much insulin as it needs. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes. This article reviews therapies and lifestyle changes that can help reduce the effects of diabetes on a person's health. It also explores whether these treatments can help "cure" diabetes, or if they are simply helpful ways to manage the condition. Contents of this article: Is diabetes curable? Medically speaking, there is no cure for diabetes but it can go into "remission." Diabetes in remission simply means the body does not show any signs of diabetes. However, the disease is technically still there. According to Diabetes Care, remission can take different forms: Partial remission: When a person has had a blood glucose level lower than that of a person with diabetes for at least 1 year without any diabetes medication. Complete remission: When the blood glucose level returns to normal, not simply pre-diabetic levels, for at least 1 year without any medications. Prolonged remission: When complete remission lasts for at least 5 years. Even if a person has had normal blood sugar levels for 20 years, their diabetes is still considered to be in remission rather than "cured." There is no known cure for diabetes. The good news is that remission is possible in many cases and can be as simple as making some lifestyl Continue reading >>

There Might Be A Cure For Diabetes After All | Star2.com

There Might Be A Cure For Diabetes After All | Star2.com

Yes, it is possible to reverse diabetes. All it requires is a structured nutrition plan, sufficient exercise and proper support. Sounds simple enough, and indeed, this is what any doctor worth their salt will be advising their diabetic patients to do. Says consultant endocrinologist Dr Zanariah Hussein: Diabetes type 2 is a progressive disease where the blood glucose keeps climbing up with time. So, to combat this, doctors need to impart advice on diet, physical activity, as well as medication. And we realise that the need for all this increases as the duration of the disease increases the need for intervention, the need for medication goes up. Associate Professor Dr Osama Hamdy, who is the Obesity Clinical Program medical director for the Joslin Diabetes Centre in the United States, explains why. Youd be surprised that only a few kilograms of weight gain can create the entire problem if that person has the genes and the family history for diabetes, he says. One kg of extra weight means more glucose is required to fuel the body, which means that more insulin has to be produced as insulin is the key that allows glucose into the bodys cells. Those with the predisposing genes will eventually start to develop insulin resistance with this increase in insulin levels. The pancreas will then start to secrete more insulin in order to overcome that resistance. And here comes the truly insidious part: The problem is that insulin is a growth hormone, which will make that person gain even more weight, says Assoc Prof Hamdy, adding that this then creates a closed loop of weight gain and insulin resistance. Overweight and obesity are definitely factors in the Malaysian context as Dr Zanariah observes that there tends to be a progressive increase in weight as the diabetes patients her Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Cure: Man Discovers Natural Way To Rid Himself Of Dangerous Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Cure: Man Discovers Natural Way To Rid Himself Of Dangerous Condition

Keith Dawson has type 2 diabetes, a potentially lifelong condition which affects millions of people and can dramatically reduce life expectancy. However, the Manchester businessman put the condition into remission after just 10 weeks of training under the expert guidance of a personal trainer from UP Fitness. Keith was overweight, constantly tired and taking medication for the condition. He would eat ready meals and takeaways and regularly eat out before he started the diet. If diabetes is not properly managed it can lead to serious consequences such as sight loss, limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. However, Keith has reduced his blood sugar levels and is now off medication. “You get around 60 and you tend to think you can put it off until tomorrow. If that was to continue then my life was going to go nowhere,” he said. “I had diabetes - at the time on tablets my blood sugar levels were around 11.6. “After a couple of weeks I came off the tablets and for the past eight weeks the levels have been below six. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. “Last Friday when I went for my diabetic blood sugar test I am now medically in remission as far as diabetes is concerned. He said there is now no need for the tablets any more, and has realised he can monitor his blood sugar by controlling his eating habits, exercising, and monitoring how much he drinks. Keith said: “Now I would say I feel fitter and more energetic then I did twenty years ago. “I suppose socially I am feeling the benefits. I am finding that I am walking more and I’m caring for my body a lot more. “I’m sleeping better. Be Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The cure for type 2 diabetes is known, but few are aware I recently posted to Facebook about a cure for diabetes and suggested someone try it. Just six days later, I received the following message from a friend: I just wanted to drop you a line and thank you for that post… My lab results at the beginning of the month were 230. After just this last week it’s down to 155. I think I’ll be in normal range within a month. Really miraculous… It’s really been a game changer for me already and I wanted you to know how much I appreciated the info and how much of a difference I think it will make in my life. Four months later, the friend posted this to Facebook: I started on this regiment when Nathan posted about it [four months ago]. My blood glucose level at that time, while taking two daily glucose meds, was 235. Two weeks ago, my [fasting] glucose level, WITHOUT the meds, was 68. If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished. Because of this understandable stifling of the message, if you are like my Facebook friend and have already experienced the type 2 diabetes cure for yourself — there are thousands of you out there — it is important for you to share your success stories as far and wide as possible. You c Continue reading >>

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

If you Google type 2 diabetes, reliable sourceslike the National Institutes of Health websitewill tell you that its a chronic condition. But Newcastle University researcher Roy Taylor, M.D., begs to differ. His research finds that some people are able to reverse their diabetes by going on an ultra low-calorie diet. For Dr. Taylors new study, 30 diabetic people ate just 700 calories daily for two months. They lost 31 pounds on average. Related: THE 21-DAY METASHREDOne Guy Lost 25 Pounds In Just 6 Weeks! Twelve of those subjects blood sugar levels fell below the threshold for diabetes, 126 milligrams per deciliter, as a result. Some of their levels were completely within the normal range, Dr. Taylor says, but the average fell within pre-diabetic parameters. Afterward, the researchers gave the study participants guidance on portion size to help them return to a normal diet while maintaining their new, lower weight. Six months later, all of those people were still diabetes-free. That means that as long as they keep their weight down, they no longer need to take insulin or constantly monitor their blood sugar. Theyre no longer at risk for premature heart attacks and strokes, or diabetes complications that can damage their eyes, kidneys, and feet, says Dr. Taylor. Plus, they just feel betterpoor blood sugar regulation can zap your energy. How does a diet cure type 2 diabetes? It comes down to weight loss, he says. Diabetes is caused by a buildup of fat in your pancreas, Dr. Taylor says. The extra fat screws with your organs ability to make insulin, the hormone that controls your blood sugar. Related: Does Sugar Really Cause Diabetes? But when you lose fat, the first bit to go is the fat in your organs, says Dr. Taylor. In the first 10 to 14 kilograms [22 to 31 pounds] of wei Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cured In Mice. Are We Next?

Diabetes Cured In Mice. Are We Next?

2 pictures According to the Center for Disease Control, 1.25 million people suffer from type 1 diabetes in the US alone. So far, it can only be managed with diet and regular doses of insulin, but scientists at UT Health San Antonio have invented a way of curing the disease in mice that may one day do the same for humans even with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a particularly unpleasant condition. It occurs when the pancreas ceases to produce the insulin needed by the body to metabolize sugar and, until the invention of artificial insulin injections, it was as deadly as cancer. Type 2 is the less severe form of the disease, where the body produces insufficient insulin; it can often be managed through diet alone. Add some color to your diet with this recipe for rainbow sheet pan veggies, using Eggland’s Bes... Surprisingly, diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Insulin is made by specialized cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, and sometimes the body's immune system turns against itself and attacks these beta cells, destroying them. Diabetes results when this destruction is over 80 percent. Invented by Bruno Doiron and Ralph DeFronzo, the UT Health technique uses gene transfer to alter cells in the pancreases of mice to make them think they're beta cells and start making insulin. This involves taking selected genes from external beta cells and using viruses as carriers to move them into the new host cells, in the diabetic pancreas. According to DeFronzo, the altered cells then produce insulin, but only in the presence of sugar, which is how a functioning beta cell is supposed to work. Otherwise, the cells would just keep cranking out the hormone, metabolizing all the sugar in the bloodstream and causing hypoglycemia. Only about 20 percent of the lost cells need t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Can you "reverse" type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes. There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does "reverse" with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission. "Complete remission" is 1 year or more of normal A1c and fasting glucose levels without using diabetes medicine. When you have complete remission, you still get tested for high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and kidney and eye problems. You do regular foot checks.1 "Prolonged remission" is 5 years or more of normal A1c and blood sugar levels without using diabetes medicine. You might have lab tests less often. But your doctor will still check on any heart, eye, foot, or other health problems you have had from diabetes, even if they are better than before.1 Remission is most likely in the early stage of diabetes or after a big weight loss. It can also happen after bariatric surgery for weight loss, which can trigger healthy changes in the body's insulin system. Remission is less likely in the later st Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Smart Egg Cartons To Transport Cells To Cure Diabetes

Smart Egg Cartons To Transport Cells To Cure Diabetes

Smart egg cartons to transport cells to cure diabetes April 13, 2018 by Aurelien Forget, Darling Rojas-Canales And Tim Dargaville, The Conversation Isolated pancreas cells stained bright green are shown sitting in the wells of the transport egg carton. Credit: Aurelien Forget , Author provided We have developed "smart egg carton" packages for transporting live human pancreas cells for transplantation to diabetic patients. The egg cartons provide oxygen and allow physical separation to prevent damage and death to the cells known as islet cells during transport. Besides a whole pancreas transplant (which has a high mortality rate), currently the only cure for diabetes is islet cell transplantation. It's a procedure available to patients with complicated Type 1 diabetes. Although hundreds of patients have successfully received donor islet cells , the rates of cell survival and effective transplantation would be vastly improved if more cells survived the initial removal and transport phases. Our technology addresses this issue. In a patient suffering from Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is not able to produce insulin, the hormone responsible for glucose metabolism. As a result, these patients need to constantly monitor their blood glucose levels, and adjust these with insulin injections throughout the day. Instability in blood glucose levels has significant implications for the patient's health in the long term , mainly due to changes in very small blood vessels that lead to diseases of the eye, kidney, nerves and cardiovascular system. Normally, insulin is produced by -cells (pronounced as "beta cells"). -cells exist in the pancreas in a packed group of cells called the "islets of Langerhans", or islets for short. Along with the -cells, other cells within the islet also pro Continue reading >>

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

Is Keto The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes?

A keto-compliant salad featuring collard greens and bacon crumbles. Photo courtesy of Brian Ambrozy/FlickrType II diabetes is one of America's most ubiquitousand expensivechronic diseases. Patients often require a suite of pharmaceutical products to manage high blood glucose levels, and the complications that arise over the long term, ranging from loss of vision and limbs to kidney failure and coronary artery disease, strain the resources of patients, their families, and the health care system. The financial strain on insurance companies, employers, and Medicaid and Medicare is even more enormous. A 2013 study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine put the lifetime direct medical costs for type II diabetes treatment at $124,000 for patients diagnosed in middle age. With nearly 30 million Americans affected by the disease, the American Diabetes Association estimates the national cost of direct diabetes care to be roughly $176 billion per year. But unlike type I diabetes, which is an autoimmune disorder that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, type II diabetes is a lifestyle disease, and thus reversible. Over time, people with type-II diabetes can be made more receptive to their own insulin, which in turn allows their bodies to effectively clear glucose from the blood without insulin medication. The trick for the vast majority of type II patients is as simple as losing weight. ("The relationship between obesity and diabetes is of such interdependence that the term 'diabesity' has been coined," two diabetes researchers wrote in 2005.) But that "trick" is actually pretty hard. Permanent weight loss without bariatric surgery is practically impossible at the population level. A 2014 study by Kaiser Permanente that looked at incidents of non-surgical dia Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

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