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Curcumin Insulin Resistance

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Can Turmeric Help Manage Diabetes? What The Evidence Says

Turmeric has been used for centuries in both food and medicine. The spice is believed to have many potential benefits for the human body. But could turmeric be a new tool to help manage diabetes? Turmeric is the common name for the root Curcuma longa. It is a bright yellow-orange spice that is a staple in traditional food dishes from many Asian countries. In this article we explore the role of turmeric in alternative and Western medicine. We go on to analyze the potential benefits of the spice for diabetes management. Turmeric and medicine Turmeric plays an important role in medical practices, such as Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Medical science is interested in the herb, as well, due to the high levels of friendly compounds it contains. Of particular interest is a class of compounds called curcuminoids. One curcuminoid found in turmeric is curcumin. This name is sometimes loosely used to describe all of the curcuminoids in turmeric. Turmeric and curcumin are being studied for a number of human conditions such as: inflammatory bowel disease h. pylori infections Turmeric is also often added to the diet to help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. Can turmeric help people with diabetes? Including turmeric in the diet seems to promote general wellbeing. There is also evidence that indicates turmeric may be especially beneficial for people with diabetes. It is believed that curcumin is the source of many of the medical benefits of turmeric. The focus of most research has been on curcumin itself, rather than whole turmeric. A review in the journal Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine compiled more than 13 years of research on the connection between diabetes and curcumin. The result suggests curcumin can help people with diabetes in d Continue reading >>

Curcumin Suppresses Notch1 Signaling: Improvements In Fatty Liver And Insulin Resistance In Rats

Curcumin Suppresses Notch1 Signaling: Improvements In Fatty Liver And Insulin Resistance In Rats

Curcumin suppresses Notch1 signaling: Improvements in fatty liver and insulin resistance in rats Affiliations: Department of Internal Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361003, P.R. China, Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the Ninth People's Hospital, Medical School of Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200011, P.R. China, Department of Breast, Longhua Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 200011, P.R. China Published online on: November 6, 2017 Copyright: Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License. Metrics: HTML 0 views | PDF 0 views Cited By (CrossRef): 0 citations Curcumin is a wellknown phenolic substance and has many pharmacological effects associated with metabolism. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying this process have yet to be determined. The Notch pathway is a signal transduction pathway involved in energy metabolism. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of curcumin administration on glucoselipid metabolism in rats subjected to a high fat diet, and investigate changes in Notch1 signaling. SpragueDawley rats (n=40) were randomly divided into four groups (10rats/group): Control diet group, high fat diet group, high fat diet plus curcumin low dose group and high fat diet plus curcumin high dose group. Following 8weeks of treatment with curcumin (100mg/kg in the low dose group and 200mg/kg in the high dose group), serum metabolic markers and hepatic gene expression patterns were investigated. No differences in body weight following 8weeks of curcumin administration (P>0.05) were observed; however, curcumin treatment did reduce visceral fat levels (periepididymal and perirenal), a Continue reading >>

Curcumin And Insulin Resistance-molecular Targets And Clinical Evidences.

Curcumin And Insulin Resistance-molecular Targets And Clinical Evidences.

Biofactors. 2016 Nov 12;42(6):561-580. doi: 10.1002/biof.1302. Epub 2016 Jun 21. Curcumin and insulin resistance-Molecular targets and clinical evidences. Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autnoma Metropolitana, Unidad Lerma, Estado de Mxico, Mxico. Oncologa y Direccin de Investigacin, Hospital General de Mxico "Dr. Eduardo Liceaga,", Mxico D.F, Mxico. Curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), the main component of the Indian spice turmeric, has been used in traditional medicine to improve diabetes and its comorbidities. Since the last two decades, scientific research has shown that in addition to its antioxidant properties, curcumin could also work as protein homeostasis regulator and it is able to modulate other intracellular pathways. Curcumin supplementation has been proposed to improve insulin resistance (IR) through the activation of the insulin receptor and its downstream pathways in several experimental models, pointing out that its clinical use may be a good and innocuous strategy to improve IR-related diseases. IR is associated with many diseases and syndromes like carbohydrate intolerance, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is imperative to identify safe therapeutic interventions aimed to reduce side effects that could lead the patient to leave the treatment. To date, many clinical trials have been carried out using turmeric and curcumin to improve metabolic syndrome, carbohydrate intolerance, diabetes, and obesity in individuals with IR. Results so far are inconclusive because dose, time of treatment, and type of curcumin can change the study outcome significantly. However, there is some clinical evidence suggesting a beneficial effect of curcumin on IR. In this revie Continue reading >>

Why All Diabetics Should Know About Turmeric

Why All Diabetics Should Know About Turmeric

By Sayer Ji • Originally published on GreenMedInfo.com Many diabetics already know about the benefits of a low-glycemic diet, but why haven’t they heard about turmeric, one of the world’s most extensively researched anti-diabetic plants? A recent literature review published in the International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism titled, “Anti-Hyperglycemic Effect and Insulin Sensitizing Effects of Turmeric and Its Principle Constituent Curcumin,” adds promising new support to the notion that the ancient Indian spice turmeric may provide an ideal drug alternative to treating and perhaps even preventing type 2 diabetes, which has become of the world’s most prevalent diagnoses. The study reviewed research published between 1998 to 2013 that indicates the active polyphenol in turmeric known as curcumin may provide an ideal intervention for type 2 diabetes, capable of mitigating characteristic pathophysiological hallmarks of the disease such as elevated blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and insulin resistance. Nineteen of the studies reviewed were cell (in vitro) and animal (in vivo), all which showed beneficial effects. Five of the studies were human clinical trials using turmeric or curcumin, three of which were performed in those with either diabetes or prediabetes. Amazingly, the animal and cell research literature review concluded that curcumin could improve the type 2 diabetic state through 10 distinctly different mechanisms, such as: Reduction in liver glucose production Reduction in liver glycogen production Stimulation of increased glucose uptake (by increasing GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 gene expressions) Increasing the activation of AMP kinase Promoting PPAR γ ligand- binding activity Suppressing hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state Stimulating insulin Continue reading >>

Curcumin Prevents High Fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance And Obesity Via Attenuating Lipogenesis In Liver And Inflammatory Pathway In Adipocytes

Curcumin Prevents High Fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance And Obesity Via Attenuating Lipogenesis In Liver And Inflammatory Pathway In Adipocytes

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Curcumin Prevents High Fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance and Obesity via Attenuating Lipogenesis in Liver and Inflammatory Pathway in Adipocytes Contributed equally to this work with: Weijuan Shao, Zhiwen Yu Affiliation Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada Contributed equally to this work with: Weijuan Shao, Zhiwen Yu Affiliation Department of Nutrition, Public Health Institute, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China Affiliations Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada, Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Current address: Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, People's Republic of China Affiliation Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada Affiliation Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada Affiliation Radiation Medicine Program, The STTARR Innovation Centre, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada Affiliations Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada, Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Affiliations Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada, Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, C Continue reading >>

Curcumin Improves Insulin Resistance In Skeletal Muscle Of Rats

Curcumin Improves Insulin Resistance In Skeletal Muscle Of Rats

Volume 21, Issue 7 , July 2011, Pages 526-533 Curcumin improves insulin resistance in skeletal muscle of rats Curcumin has been reported to lower plasma lipids and glucose in diabetic rats, and to decrease body weight in obese rats, which may partly be due to increased fatty acid oxidation and utilization in skeletal muscle. Diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet plus streptozotocin (STZ, 30mg/kg BW) were fed a diet containing 50, 150, or 250mg/kg BW curcumin for 7wk. Curcumin dose-dependently decreased plasma lipids and glucose and the dose 150mg/kg BW appeared to be adequate to produce a significant effect. Curcumin supplementation reduced glucose and insulin tolerance measured as areas under the curve. L6 myotubes were treated with palmitate (0.25mmol/L) in the presence of different levels of curcumin for 24h in our in vitro experiment. Curcumin at 10mol/L was adequate to cause a significant increase in 2-deoxy-[3H]d-glucose uptake by L6 myotubes. Curcumin up-regulated expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), CD36, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, but down-regulated expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 and phosphorylated glycogen synthase (GS) in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Moreover, curcumin increased phosphorylated acetyl COA carboxylase in L6 myotubes. The effects of curcumin on these enzymes except for GS were suppressed by AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. LKB1, an upstream kinase of AMPK, was activated by curcumin and inhibited by radicicol, an LKB1 destabilizer. Curcumin improves muscular insulin resistance by increasing oxidation of fatty acid and glucose, which is, at least in part, mediated through LKB1-AMPK pathway. Continue reading >>

Frontiers | Curcumin Improves Palmitate-induced Insulin Resistance In Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells By Maintaining Proteostasis In Endoplasmic Reticulum | Pharmacology

Frontiers | Curcumin Improves Palmitate-induced Insulin Resistance In Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells By Maintaining Proteostasis In Endoplasmic Reticulum | Pharmacology

Front. Pharmacol., 21 March 2017 | Curcumin Improves Palmitate-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Maintaining Proteostasis in Endoplasmic Reticulum 1Department of Endocrinology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous Prefecture, Enshi, China 2Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China 3Department of Laboratory, Dongfeng General Hospital of Hubei Medical University, Shiyan, China Dysfunction of proteasome and autophagy will result in disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis, and thus lead to long-term and chronic ER stress and subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR), which is implicated in the occurrence and development of insulin resistance. Curcumin exerts beneficial metabolic effects in in vitro cells and in vivo animal models of diabetes and diabetic complications including cardiovascular diseases, due to its powerful anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its impacts on insulin resistance of endothelial cells and its underlying mechanism(s) remain ill-defined. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin action in ER protein quality control was related to improvement of insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured with saturated fatty acid palmitate. We found that palmitate treatment induced insulin resistance of HUVECs and activated both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Palmitate-stimulated activation of the UPS and autophagy was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of ER stress. In addition, curcumin supplementation mitigated palmitate-induced insulin resistance, inhibited the UPS, and activated autophagy. Furthermore, curcumin administration suppressed palmitate-i Continue reading >>

Curcumin For Weight Loss, Obesity And Insulin Sensitivity

Curcumin For Weight Loss, Obesity And Insulin Sensitivity

Curcumin for Weight Loss, Obesity and Insulin Sensitivity Taking curcumin for weight loss may support a comprehensive weight loss plan, which should include a healthy diet and exercise. However, there are no clinical trials that suggest that taking curcumin supplements alone can result in weight loss. Curcumin may help modulate blood sugar levels, reduce insulin resistance , support healthy cholesterol levels and reduce the severity of inflammation. These characteristics may help decrease the risk of obesity-related chronic diseases, such as type II diabetes. Curcumins effects on weight loss and obesity have been the subject of some scientific investigation, though there are limited human research trials. It has been observed in animal studies to induce certain anti-obesity effects (such as controlling blood glucose levels and supporting heart health) that may support healthy weight loss. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the bioactive constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa) . Turmeric is made from the rhizomes (underground stems) of the plant Curcuma longa. These rhizomes are boiled, dried and ground to produce turmeric, a staple spice of Indian cuisine. In addition to its long history of culinary use, turmeric has been used for millennia in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine to treat liver disorder, digestive conditions, inflammation and infection . Contemporary research has revealed that curcumin is the bioactive constituent of turmeric. Curcumin exhibits a number of useful properties : It has been observed to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and anti-lipid effects. Curcumin and turmeric have been the subject of extensive scientific investigation. In particular, a great deal of research has been conducted on the use of curcumi Continue reading >>

Proteasome Inhibitors, Including Curcumin, Improve Pancreatic -cell Function And Insulin Sensitivity In Diabetic Mice

Proteasome Inhibitors, Including Curcumin, Improve Pancreatic -cell Function And Insulin Sensitivity In Diabetic Mice

Proteasome inhibitors, including curcumin, improve pancreatic -cell function and insulin sensitivity in diabetic mice Nutrition & Diabetes volume 6, page e205 (2016) | Download Citation Type 2 diabetes stems from obesity-associated insulin resistance, and in the genetically susceptible, concomitant pancreatic -cell failure can occur, which further exacerbates hyperglycemia. Recent work by our group and others has shown that the natural polyphenol curcumin attenuates the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in mouse models of hyperinsulinemic or compensated type 2 diabetes. Although several potential downstream molecular targets of curcumin exist, it is now recognized to be a direct inhibitor of proteasome activity. We now show that curcumin also prevents -cell failure in a mouse model of uncompensated obesity-related insulin resistance (Leprdb/db on the Kaliss background). In this instance, dietary supplementation with curcumin prevented hyperglycemia, increased insulin production and lean body mass, and prolonged lifespan. In addition, we show that short-term in vivo treatment with low dosages of two molecularly distinct proteasome inhibitors celastrol and epoxomicin reverse hyperglycemia in mice with -cell failure by increasing insulin production and insulin sensitivity. These studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may prove useful for patients with diabetes by improving both -cell function and relieving insulin resistance. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not sufficiently produce and/or respond to insulin, a pancreatic endocrine hormone crucial for maintaining glucose homeostasis. Insulin deficiency leads to hyperglycemia, which, if uncontrolled, will acutely cause life-threatening ketoacidosis and in the long-term foster vascular dise Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Research indicates that you don't need drugs to control blood sugar. Food, herbs, and spices are the future of medicine. Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Here's what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesn't work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells' sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake.[i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. In other words, the curcumin was 100% effective at preventing Type 2 diabetes. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger g Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Metabolic Syndrome In 4 Easy Steps

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance And Metabolic Syndrome In 4 Easy Steps

If you want to do yourself any favour, you may well start off by engaging with the process to learn about how to reverse insulin resistance and of course reverse metabolic syndrome too whilst you are it. It is not enough to learn about how to reverse insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome though. I want you to start indulging in the practical steps on offer here today. Insulin resistance is one of the deadliest ailments around. Insulin resistance is a soft, creepy disease that does your body organs silent damage. You remember in 2010 when the movie, Inception was released. It was a fascinating movie. Inception was a science fiction movie where Leonardo Dicaprio was the star man. Leonardo was enshrined with powers of invading people’s dreams and in turn invade their minds with a view to planting ideas. Leo and his team were also expected to extract information from their victims’ minds and pass on the information to their paymasters. Purists will call the movie unethical as there would be an element of mind control. But let’s get real and put things in perspective. It is a movie. It’s not real, folks. For Leo and his team to succeed in this venture, they will have to be given time to allow this “mind seed” to sprout. This is what happens with insulin resistance and its sister ailment metabolic syndrome. They need time to “grow”. The problem is these two conditions do have plenty of time to develop because for the most part, they invade your body and quietly establish themselves over years without you knowing it. There are at least 300 million people worldwide who at the moment are currently unaware their bodies have been “invaded” by insulin resistance. For me I believe every adult over 45 should adopt measures to reverse insulin resistance and met Continue reading >>

Curcumin Extract For Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Curcumin Extract For Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of curcumin in delaying development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the prediabetic population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This randomized, double-blinded, placebo- controlled trial included subjects (n = 240) with criteria of prediabetes. All subjects were randomly assigned to receive either curcumin or placebo capsules for 9 months. To assess the T2DM progression after curcumin treatments and to determine the number of subjects progressing to T2DM, changes in β-cell functions (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]-β, C-peptide, and proinsulin/insulin), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), anti-inflammatory cytokine (adiponectin), and other parameters were monitored at the baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-month visits during the course of intervention. RESULTS After 9 months of treatment, 16.4% of subjects in the placebo group were diagnosed with T2DM, whereas none were diagnosed with T2DM in the curcumin-treated group. In addition, the curcumin-treated group showed a better overall function of β-cells, with higher HOMA-β (61.58 vs. 48.72; P < 0.01) and lower C-peptide (1.7 vs. 2.17; P < 0.05). The curcumin-treated group showed a lower level of HOMA-IR (3.22 vs. 4.04; P < 0.001) and higher adiponectin (22.46 vs. 18.45; P < 0.05) when compared with the placebo group. CONCLUSIONS A 9-month curcumin intervention in a prediabetic population significantly lowered the number of prediabetic individuals who eventually developed T2DM. In addition, the curcumin treatment appeared to improve overall function of β-cells, with very minor adverse effects. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the curcumin intervention in a prediabetic population may be beneficial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Study design and participants This randomized, d Continue reading >>

Turmeric And Diabetes: 10 Ways Turmeric Can Help

Turmeric And Diabetes: 10 Ways Turmeric Can Help

One diabetes medicine may lower blood sugar and cholesterol, protect your eyes and kidneys, relieve pain, prevent cancer, and improve your sex life. It also tastes good. This medicine is turmeric, made from the root Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family. About 2% to 5% of turmeric is the yellow/orange powder called curcumin, which gives curry powder its beautiful color. The taste has a bite to it, but with the right recipe, you’ll love it. Or you can take capsules. Turmeric has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic (Indian) and Chinese medicine. They give it for pain relief, improved digestion and liver function, and for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Curcumin may also help treat aspects of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2. A scientific paper from the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and McGill University reviewed multiple studies of curcumin from around the world. Most of these are studies of diabetic rats and mice. They need to be repeated in humans to gain scientific acceptance, but I’m convinced. • In many of these studies, curcumin reduced blood sugar and cholesterol levels. In addition: • Curcumin prevented liver fat accumulation. Rats who consumed curcumin had reduced liver fat on a high-fat diet compared to rats not consuming curcumin. • Curcumin suppressed the activities of white blood cells called macrophages that cause inflammation. This action of turmeric/curcumin could potentially slow down many complications of diabetes, in which inflammation plays a role. • Curcumin improves insulin function. It reduces insulin resistance by helping insulin get into cells, perhaps on the AMPK pathway that exercise also opens up. In a study of 240 people in Thailand, curcumin prevented prediabetes from progressing to diabetes. Rou Continue reading >>

Curcumin And Diabetes: A Systematic Review

Curcumin And Diabetes: A Systematic Review

Correspondence should be addressed to Dong-wei Zhang; dongwei@gmail.com and Jun-Li Liu; [email protected] Copyright ©  Dong-wei Zhang et al. is is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. e active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inammatory properties. e applications of the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a “super curcumin” through improvement of the bioavailability to bring Ayu r vedic [ ] and traditional Chinese medicine for thou- curcumin (Figure (c)), shown to be a diferuloylmethane, was thought to be the main active ingredient derived from the root of turmeric. (c) e enol and keto forms of curcumin are common mice, intraperitoneal administration of curcumin ( mM; administration of curcumin ( mg/kg⋅BW) for  days was inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) []. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase  (antiapoptosis []) Curcuminoids Structures Antidiabetic function Reference Continue reading >>

Anti-inflammatory Effects Of Curcumin On Insulinresistance Index, Levels Of Interleukin-6, C-reactiveprotein, And Liver Histology In Polycystic Ovarysyndrome-induced Rats

Anti-inflammatory Effects Of Curcumin On Insulinresistance Index, Levels Of Interleukin-6, C-reactiveprotein, And Liver Histology In Polycystic Ovarysyndrome-induced Rats

Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Curcumin on InsulinResistance Index, Levels of Interleukin-6, C-ReactiveProtein, and Liver Histology in Polycystic OvarySyndrome-Induced Rats 2Laboratorys Animal Center and Cellular and Molecular Research Laboratory, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran Find articles by Latifeh Karimzadeh Bardei 1Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran 2Laboratorys Animal Center and Cellular and Molecular Research Laboratory, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran 3Department of Biology, Damghan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran 4Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran *Corresponding Address:P.O. BOX: 31979-37551, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty ofBiological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Karaj, Iran, Email: [email protected] Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer Received 2016 Jul 2; Accepted 2016 Sep 6. Copyright Any use, distribution, reproduction or abstract of this publication in any medium, with the exception of commercial purposes, is permitted provided the original work is properly cited This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of theCreative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use,distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Curcumin protects the liver against injury and fibrosis through suppressinghepatic inflammation, attenuating hepatic oxidative stress (OS), and inhibiting hepaticstellate cells (HSCs) activation. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) a Continue reading >>

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