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Ct Scan And Diabetes Medications

Preparing For Your Pet/ct Scan

Preparing For Your Pet/ct Scan

It is important that you be as comfortable and relaxed as possible prior to and during the PET or PET/CT scan. You can take medications such as Valium, Ativan, or pain medications to lessen any anxiety or discomfort you may have. Please talk with your physician if you are taking medication for relaxation or need information. (NOTE: If you will be taking any of the above medications before your scan, plan to have someone drive you home). Do not wear clothing with snaps, zippers, buckles, or any other large pieces of metal. Do not wear any jewelry. You will be asked to remove any items that could potentially interfere with the scanning procedure (you will be able to wear a hospital gown). In most circumstances, reading material, music, and relaxation tapes are allowed in the procedure rooms. Do not eat or drink for six hours before your test (except plain water with nothing added). Also, do not suck or chew candy, gum, or lozenges. You may take those medications prescribed by your physician prior to your scan. If you have diabetes: Insulin or oral agents used to control your diabetes SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN WITHIN FOUR HOURS of your PET or PET/CT scan. The Nuclear Medicine Department may adjust your eating restrictions if your diabetes is diet-controlled. Limit intense physical activity 24 hours prior to your exam. This includes running, heavy lifting, sports, yoga, and deep massages. If you are, or think you may be pregnant, discuss this with you physician. Generally, a PET or PET/CT scan is not performed on pregnant women. If you are breastfeeding, you will be instructed not to breast feed for 24 hours after the injection for the PET or PET/CT scan. Nursing mothers are encouraged to pump and store milk in anticipation of exposure to the radioactive tracer. After registerin Continue reading >>

Pet-ct: Preparing For Your Scan - Wake Forest Baptist, North Carolina

Pet-ct: Preparing For Your Scan - Wake Forest Baptist, North Carolina

What should I expect BEFORE my PET-CT scan? If you need to take your medication in the morning prior to the scan, take it with water. Most claustrophobic patients are able to tolerate a PET or PET-CTscan . Talk to your doctor if you think you need some additional anti-anxiety medication for the scan. We cannot prescribe or supply medication. Do not eat or drink anything for at least 4 hours before the exam, except plain water. If your doctor has told you to take your regular medicine, take it with plenty of water. If you are diabetic, do not drink or eat anything for at least 4 hours prior to your scan. Take your diabetic medication as usual. If your doctor has told you to take your regular medicine, take it with plenty of water. Avoid candies, gum or beverages other than water. All patients are required to check in and register 30 minutes prior to scheduled exam time. Wear loose-fitting, comfortable clothes with no metal (zippers, under wire bras, etc) for the test. Leave your watch, jewelry and other valuables at home. Many patients receive a contrast agent intravenously (IV) during their PET-CT test. If your doctor or the radiologist has determined that this procedure will enhance your PET-CT scan results, the technologist will place an IV in your arm or hand prior to going into the test. (Please see the section on Contrast Medium .) If you've ever had an allergic reaction to contrast, tell your doctor and the technologist. The doctor may prescribe special medicine for you to take before the exam and also while you are here for the exam. You should bring the last 2 doses of medicine with you. What will I experience DURING my PET-CT Scan? You will be required to lie flat with your arms raised above your head. If you think you will be unable to keep your arms above yo Continue reading >>

Pet/ct Fdg Scan For Patients With Diabetes

Pet/ct Fdg Scan For Patients With Diabetes

​​​​​​​​​DOWNLOADABLE PDF: English | Chinese | Ru​ssian | ​​Spanish​ This handout gives special instructions for patients with diabetes who are having a PET/CT FDG scan at UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, or Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Your doctor has ordered an exam for you called a PET/CT FDG scan. Please ask for the handout called “PET/CT FDG Scan” if you do not already have it. PET stands for positron emission tomography. CT stands for computed tomography. FDG stands for 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-Glucose. This exam uses Fluorine-18 FDG, a radioactive tracer that acts like glucose in the body. The tracer helps us see how much energy your cells are using. We measure this with a FDG PET/CT scan. A PET/CT camera takes 2 types of pictures: The PET scan shows where the radioactive tracer has collected in your body. The CT scan provides pictures of your body structures. Together, the PET and CT images help your doctor see changes in your cells. How to Prepare People with diabetes have trouble processing glucose. This means you need to follow special instructions for your scan. Closely follow all instructions in this handout. This will help keep your blood sugar under control and give us the clearest results from this exam. Call your diabetes care provider 2 weeks before your scan to talk about the best way to prepare for your scan. Review the instructions in this handout with this provider. Do not exercise for 48 hours before your scan appointment. Starting 12 hours before your scan, do not take any dextrose medicines by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or intravenous (IV) line. Starting 12 hours before your appointment time, you cannot eat or drink. You may only drink plain water during this 12-hour fast. Your scan will be early Continue reading >>

Why Should I Stop Taking Metformin Before A Ct Scan?

Why Should I Stop Taking Metformin Before A Ct Scan?

Dear Pharmacist, I am currently taking metformin (Glucophage) for my type two diabetes. When scheduling an upcoming CT scan, my doctor told me not to take my metformin the morning of the study, as well as for two days following the scan. What’s the relationship? Dear Metformin, Depending on the specific purpose of the study, many CT scans require a dye or contrast to be injected into the patient prior to the scan. The dye will help highlight tissues so that more can be determined from the CT scan by your doctor. This dye, like the metformin, is filtered out of your blood by your kidneys for elimination from your body as waste. So in an attempt not to overload your kidneys, it is recommended that you do not take your metformin while your body is working to eliminate the dye from your body (approximately 48 hours). Taking the two together risks the possibility of the metformin building up in your body, which can lead to further severe side effects. Continue reading >>

Ct Scan (computerized Tomography, Cat Scan)

Ct Scan (computerized Tomography, Cat Scan)

Computerized (or computed) tomography, and often formerly referred to as computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan, is an X-ray procedure that combines many X-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate cross-sectional views and, if needed, three-dimensional images of the internal organs and structures of the body. Computerized tomography is more commonly known by its abbreviated names, CT scan or CAT scan. A CT scan is used to define normal and abnormal structures in the body and/or assist in procedures by helping to accurately guide the placement of instruments or treatments. A large donut-shaped X-ray machine or scanner takes X-ray images at many different angles around the body. These images are processed by a computer to produce cross-sectional pictures of the body. In each of these pictures the body is seen as an X-ray "slice" of the body, which is recorded on a film. This recorded image is called a tomogram. "Computerized axial tomography" refers to the recorded tomogram "sections" at different levels of the body. Imagine the body as a loaf of bread and you are looking at one end of the loaf. As you remove each slice of bread, you can see the entire surface of that slice from the crust to the center. The body is seen on CT scan slices in a similar fashion from the skin to the central part of the body being examined. When these levels are further "added" together, a three-dimensional picture of an organ or abnormal body structure can be obtained. CT scans are performed to analyze the internal structures of various parts of the body. This includes the head, where traumatic injuries, (such as blood clots or skull fractures), tumors, and infections can be identified. In the spine, the bony structure of the vertebrae can be accurately defined, as can the anatomy Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

If You Have Diabetes…how To Fast Safely For A Medical Test

Recently, an employee at Bottom Line Publications was scheduled for a colonoscopy, the screening test for colon cancer. The medical test turned into medical mayhem. The day before the test, the woman followed her doctor’s orders to start ingesting a “clear liquid” diet, which includes soft drinks, Jell-O and other clear beverages and foods. But when she drank the “prep”—the bowel-cleaning solution that is consumed the evening before a colonoscopy (and sometimes also the morning of)—she vomited. Over and over. As a result, her colon wasn’t sufficiently emptied to conduct the test, which had to be postponed. What went wrong? The woman has diabetes—and her glucose (blood sugar) levels had become unstable, triggering nausea and vomiting. Yet not one medical professional—not a doctor, not a nurse, not a medical technician—had warned her that people with diabetes need to take special precautions with food and diabetes medicine whenever they have any medical test that involves an extended period of little or no eating. Unfortunately, this lack of diabetes-customized instruction about medical tests is very common. What you need to know… If you’re undergoing a test that requires only overnight fasting, which includes many types of CT scans, MRIs and X-rays, make sure that the test is scheduled for early in the morning—no later than 9 am. That way, you will be able to eat after the test by 10 am or 11 am, which will help to stabilize your blood sugar as much as possible. Don’t expect your blood sugar levels to be perfect after the test. The important thing is to keep them from getting too high or too low. Conventional dietitians and doctors specify clear liquids and foods that reflect the conventional American diet, such as regular soda, sports drink Continue reading >>

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Content Title Fetched

2. Basic guideline for management of non insulin medication for short fast/minor surgery Refer to the Diabetes Team for advice if necessary IV insulin is not necessary for short procedures if a rapid recovery is expected and the patient is expected to eat following the procedure Consider hospital admission for frail/elderly and/or identified at risk patients Review and alter medication proactively if necessary to prevent problems with hypo/hyperglycaemia before, during and following procedure Monitor blood glucose levels appropriately to assess glycaemic control peri procedure Ensure appropriate treatment for hypoglycaemia is available Ensure prevention and management of hypoglycaemia is discussed with patients (and carers) prior to procedure Avoid insulin omission thereby reducing risk of diabetic ketoacidosis For patients who are prescribed Metformin see Radiological Procedures with Iodine Containing Contrast Exclude a contraindication (e.g. pancreatitis) before restarting a GLP-1 analogue (Liraglutide / Lixisenatide /Exenatide) Diabetes Specialist Nurses (Office hours Monday Friday) Ninewells Hospital - 01382 660111 ext. 32293/36009 Perth Royal Infirmary - 01382 660111 ext. 13476 Abbey Health Centre, Arbroath - 01241 447811 Diabetes Specialist Registrar - Page 5416 Ensure appropriate treatments for hypoglycaemia are available Take diabetes medication with food as prescribed before fast. Resume usual diabetes medication as prescribed with food following procedure GLP-1 analogues (e.g. Exenatide/ Liraglutide/Lixisenatide) slow gastric emptying Omit GLP-1 analogue during bowel preparation Before restarting GLP-1analogue Exclude any contraindication after procedure e.g. pancreatitis or active bowel disease Consider reduction in insulin dose (30 50%) prior to fast to red Continue reading >>

Metformin And Contrast Media: Where Is The Conflict?

Metformin And Contrast Media: Where Is The Conflict?

Abstract Intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media to patients who are receiving metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, can result in lactic acidosis. However, this rare complication occurs only if the contrast medium causes renal failure, and the patient continues to take metformin in the presence of renal failure. Because metformin is excreted primarily by the kidneys, continued intake of metformin after the onset of renal failure results in a toxic accumulation of this drug and subsequent lactic acidosis. To avoid this complication, metformin must be withheld after the administration of the contrast agent for 48 hours, during which the contrast-induced renal failure becomes clinically apparent. If renal function is normal at 48 hours, the metformin can be restarted. There is no scientific justification for withholding metformin for 48 hours before administration of the contrast medium, as currently recommended in the package insert. The authors review the pharmacology of metformin and present a departmental policy for managing patients with diabetes who receive metformin and who require intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media. Continue reading >>

Abdominal Ct Scan (computed Tomography Scan)

Abdominal Ct Scan (computed Tomography Scan)

Abdominal CT Scan (Computed Tomography Scan) CT scans are pictures taken by a specialized x-ray machine. The machine circles your body and scans an area from every angle within that circle. The machine measures how much the x-ray beams change as they pass through your body. It then relays that information to a computer, which generates a collection of black-and-white pictures, each showing a slightly different "slice" or cross-section of your internal organs. Because these "slices" are spaced only about a quarter-inch apart, they give a very good representation of your internal organs and other structures. Doctors use CT scans to evaluate all major parts of the body, including the abdomen, back, chest, and head. A CT scan is an excellent way to view the organs inside your abdomen. It is especially useful for looking at solid organs, such as the liver, pancreas, spleen, kidneys, and adrenal glands. It is also excellent for viewing the large blood vessels that pass through the abdomen (the aorta and vena cava) and for finding lymph nodes in the abdomen. Organs that can change their shape when they are empty or full, such as stomach and intestines, are harder for a CT scan to evaluate well, because it is sometimes difficult for a doctor to tell for sure if they are abnormal. Often the CT can give some information about these organs, though. Abdominal CT scans are often used to look for signs of inflammation or infection inside the abdomen in different organs, to look for cancer, or to look for injury to one or another internal organ. If you will be receiving contrast dye during your study, it is appropriate for you to have a blood test to check your kidney function before the test. (A test that was done during the past six months may be adequate.) People who are taking th Continue reading >>

Metformin/iodinated Contrast Materials Interactions

Metformin/iodinated Contrast Materials Interactions

This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment. Medical warning: Serious. These medicines may interact and cause very harmful effects. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information. How the interaction occurs: If you are taking metformin when you have your imaging test procedure, your kidneys may not be able to properly remove metformin from your blood. What might happen: The effects of metformin may increase and cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis, especially if you have kidney problems. Symptoms of lactic acidosis are: feeling very weak, tired, or uncomfortable, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual or unexpected stomach discomfort, feeling cold, dizziness or lightheadedness, suddenly developing a slow or irregular heartbeat. What you should do about this interaction: Contact your doctor about taking these two medicines together before you have any tests done that use an iodine dye. Your doctor may want to check to make sure your kidneys are working properly before and after the imaging test. In some cases, your doctor may instruct you to stop taking your metformin before the exam and not to begin using it again until 48 hours after your test.Your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of this drug interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. Continue reading >>

Pet/ct Scan: How To Prepare, What To Expect & Safety Tips

Pet/ct Scan: How To Prepare, What To Expect & Safety Tips

PET/CT Scan: How to Prepare, What to Expect & Safety Tips PET/CT Scan: How to Prepare, What to Expect & Safety Tips Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging or a PET scan, is a diagnostic examination that involves getting images of the body based on the detection of radiation from the emission of positrons. Positrons are tiny particles emitted from a radioactive substance administered to the patient. Please let us know if you have any allergies or adverse reactions to medications. If you are pregnant or may be pregnant, please tell your doctor or technologist. Please leave your valuables at home or in your room in the hospital. Please let us now if you need interpreting services, this can be arranged for you. Bring a list of your current medications with you (out-patient). You will be asked to follow the Limited Carbohydrate diet for the previous 24 hours before the date of your appointment. Do not eat or drink anything, except water, for 6 hours before the exam. You may drink water, as much water as you can would be helpful, until arrival. Routine medications may be taken, unless you have been instructed otherwise. If you are diabetic, you may take your diabetes medication no less than 4 hours prior to the exam. Arrive 15-30 minutes before your PET scan. The technologist will verify your identification and exam requested. You will be given a contrast screening form to complete. In certain situations, the doctor may order lab tests prior to contrast being given. Commonly, contrast is injected into a vein to better define the images throughout the body. If the radiologist believes this is helpful, a small intravenous (IV) line is placed in an arm vein. Through this line, the contrast and the isotope will be injected. The contrast will be excreted through yo Continue reading >>

What Med Should Not Be Given Prior To A Ct Scan With Contrast And For 48 Hours After?

What Med Should Not Be Given Prior To A Ct Scan With Contrast And For 48 Hours After?

What med should not be given prior to a CT scan with contrast and for 48 hours after? This question was on my complex care final, and I honestly for the life of me had no idea what the answer could have been. Maybe this is like a duh question and I just wasn't thinking.. but does anyone have any idea? Meformin should be stopped before contrast is given as in a CT scan due to the increased incidence of lactic acidosis. The answer the OP is looking for is Acetylcystine. The dose comes from this study among others: Prophylaxis of contrast-induced nephropathy in pat... [Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2003] - PubMed result FYI, you'd better look at creatinine, too. We've had radiology refuse to do contrast based on the patient's labs...so, look up it's effect on kidney function (med listed above, and creatinine). If you understand the "why," you'll never forget the "what." Meformin should be stopped before contrast is given as in a CT scan due to the increased incidence of lactic acidosis. The answer the OP is looking for is Acetylcystine. The dose comes from this study among others: Prophylaxis of contrast-induced nephropathy in pat... [Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2003] - PubMed result Acetylcystine would not be held prior to a study, it would actually be given, its also called mucomyst.....its the stuff that smells like rotten eggs.....its given to protect the kidneys from contrast dye.....Which is exactaly why the glucophage is held prior to CT studies. Glucophage can increase the kidneys likelihood of holding onto the contrast dye leading to toxic levels, basically decreasing the clearing time of the contrast dyes Hm, at my hospital we don't give Metformin for 48 hours after CT with contrast. Holy hell, I would so fail the NCLEX if I had to take it again. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fdg-positron Emission Tomography

Metformin And Fdg-positron Emission Tomography

Metformin and FDG-positron emission tomography Sponsored Content by Bruker BioSpin - NMR, EPR and Imaging Jun 9 2015 18F-FDG is a radiolabelled glucose analogue that provides a key tool in the diagnosis and monitoring of tumors1. Many tumors have a high metabolic rate and require large amounts of glucose to satisfy their energy demands. Consequently, when 18F-FDG is injected into a person with a cancerous lesion it will become concentrated at the site of the tumor. The radiolabel can then be visualized using positron emission tomography (PET) to determine the presence of a tumor and allows calculation of the rate of glucose uptake by the tumor to give an indication of how aggressive it is. FDG positron emission tomography and diabetes The accuracy of this technique, however, can be challenged in patients with diabetes as a consequence of the differences in the way glucose is handled. Most importantly, low blood glucose is needed to conduct the test and this can be difficult to achieve in patients with diabetes, especially since anti-diabetic medication needs to be discontinued prior to imaging2. High glucose levels can reduce the sensitivity of PET imaging and the accuracy of glucose uptake measurements3. Drugs affecting glucose metabolism that are used to manage type 2 diabetes (and therefore are taken by a significant proportion of patients requiring tumor imaging) also interfere with 18F-FDG PET. In particular, the oral anti-hyperglycemic treatment metformin tends to cause 18F-FDG to accumulate in the bowel rather than just at the site of a tumor. This can be seriously detrimental to interpretation of 18F-FDG PET images. Radioactivity observed in the bowel may be attributed to metformin when in fact there is a tumor present or, conversely, be reported as a tumor whe Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

CT scan is a sophisticated imaging tool utilizing x-rays and powerful computers to generate cross-sectional images of the body. CT scans are used to diagnosis wide range of diseases from head to toe. Spiral CT was introduced in the 1990's, which enable much faster and accurate scanning capabilities. Main Street Radiology installed the first 16-detector spiral CT in Queens, with the ability to scan up to 16 times faster than a traditional spiral CT. About the Procedure Depending on the type of scan requested by the referring physician, a patient may receive oral and/or intravenous (IV) contrast. Oral contrast is used to outline the stomach and intestines during the exam, and is given as a flavored drink approximately one hour prior to the actual scan. IV contrast is an iodine-based liquid injected into the vein during the scan to highlight organs of the body. The patient lies on a table that automatically moves the patient's body through a "donut" shaped tube, where a thin beam of x-rays is generated to produce high-resolution cross-sectional images of the body. The actual scanning time is usually less than 30 seconds with a 16-detector spiral CT. The patient may be asked to hold his/her breath during the scan, so that body part being imaged does not move during the scan acquisition. Preparation for Procedure To prepare for a CT scan, we ask that you follow the following guidelines: Please do not wear any item that is metal – including watches, hair pins, hearing aids, eyeglasses and jewelry. Please also do not wear any clothing that does not contain metal buttons, snaps or zippers. If you are, or think you may be pregnant please let us know as a CT scan is not generally performed on pregnant women. CT Scan with Contrast Refrain from eating AND drinking 4 hours prior t Continue reading >>

Glucovance (glyburide And Metformin) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Glucovance (glyburide And Metformin) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

oval, yellow, imprinted with LOGO 5712, 5/500 What are the possible side effects of glyburide and metformin (Glucovance)? This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness , or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever , confusion or weakness; or nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). sneezing, runny nose, cough or other signs of a cold; mild nausea or vomiting, diarrhea , upset stomach. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about glyburide and metformin (Glucovance)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to glyburide or metformin, or if you have kidney disease or are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking glyburide and metformin. Before you take this medication, tell your Continue reading >>

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