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Cow Milk And Diabetes Type 2

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

The relationship between milk product consumption and type 2 diabetes has been examined in several meta-analyses. Evidence to date suggests that milk product consumption is associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Highlights Milk product consumption is associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes; Total dairy and low-fat milk products are largely associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes; High-fat dairy/dairy fat is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Fermented dairy, including cheese and yogurt, is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; There appears to be an inverse dose-response relationship between yogurt and cheese and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Synopsis Several meta-analyses of numerous prospective cohort studies have examined the role of milk products in the development of type 2 diabetes. The totality of the evidence to date suggests that there is an inverse association between milk product consumption, including specific milk products such as yogurt and cheese, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Evidence A meta-analysis published in 2014 investigated the association between the consumption of different types of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The analysis consisted of data from 14 prospective cohort studies (N = 459,790), including the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II.1 Total, high-fat and low-fat dairy intake were not associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Yogurt consumption (both plain and flavoured) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled relative risk of 0.82 per one serving of yogurt/day, 95% CI: Continue reading >>

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

New Evidence That Type 1 Diabetes Is Linked To The Level Of A1 Beta-casein In Most Types Of Cow Milk

New Evidence That Type 1 Diabetes Is Linked To The Level Of A1 Beta-casein In Most Types Of Cow Milk

New evidence that type 1 diabetes is linked to the level of A1 beta-casein in most types of cow milk 2 November 2017 / Latest News , Media Releases , Diabetes in the news This article was to be published in The Conversation but waspulled at the last minute as senior editors "felt that theinterests of associated commercial parties, who might benefit fromdissemination of the article, were too great". It has since beenpublished in several other publications. Authors:Keith Woodford,Agricultural Management Group, Lincoln University, Christchurch,New Zealand,& Boyd Swinburn,School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, NewZealand. Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacksits own insulin-producing cells, is on the rise globally. Early evidence of an association between type 1 diabetes and aprotein in cow milk, known as A1 beta-casein, was published in 2003. However, the notion that thestatistically strong association could be causal has remainedcontroversial. we have reviewed the overall evidence that links A1 beta-casein totype 1 diabetes.Our research brings forward new ways oflooking at that evidence. Type 1 diabetes is the form of diabetes that often manifestsduring childhood. The key change is an inability of the pancreas toproduce insulin, which is essential for transporting glucose acrossinternal cell membranes. There is common confusion between type 1 and the much morecommon type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.This means that the immune system attacks the body's own cells.Insulin-producing cells in the pancreas are then destroyed by"friendly fire". There is no accepted lifestyle change that will prevent or curetype 1 diabetes and daily insulin injections are requiredthroughout life. In contrast, people who d Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Milk And Diabetes: A Closer Look At The Best Options

Milk And Diabetes: A Closer Look At The Best Options

Like all individual foods in our diet, there’s often debate about whether they are good or bad for our health – and milk doesn’t escape this analysis. When it comes to milk and diabetes, you have full fat, skim milk and low fat options for dairy milk. Then you have soy milk, rice milk, almond milk and coconut milk for non-dairy options. So overall, what is the best option? Let’s explore this topic in more detail, starting with dairy milk… Dairy Milk On the one hand, dairy products have long been promoted as healthy inclusions in our diet – they contain calcium (for strong bones), along with magnesium, vitamin D, and whey proteins. Milk proteins in particular are considered high quality proteins, which according to research may help in reducing body fat and insulin resistance, along with showing benefits for glucose regulation and metabolic health. On the other hand though, milk also contains fat and carbs. For many the major concern is the fat content, which is why it’s often assumed that skim milk or low fat options are best. Before delving into this further, let’s just compare the nutrition facts for dairy milks. Per half cup Full cream milk Low fat Fat free Calories 76 51 39.5 Total carbs 6 6 6 Protein 4 4 4 Fat 4.05 1.18 0 Notice something about these? They all have the same carb and protein content, the only difference is the calories and fat content. Because they are so similar, you can really choose any of the options. Don’t be scared of full fat as studies suggest there is no association between intake of full fat dairy and type 2 diabetes – which basically means they are not necessarily good or bad. As for cardiovascular disease, research indicates that dairy consumption (full fat or not) may have a beneficial effect, reducing the risk of st Continue reading >>

New Research Finds Link Between Cow’s Milk And Diabetes

New Research Finds Link Between Cow’s Milk And Diabetes

A new paper has revealed a connection between dairy consumption and type 1 diabetes. Seven researchers have analyzed over 70 studies, producing a paper which has been accepted by the Journal of Nutrition & Diabetes. The paper explores individuals with genetic risk factors. The researchers state that they have evidence that the protein A1 beta-casein, which is found in cow’s milk “is a primary causal trigger of type 1 diabetes”. There was a positive correlation between the consumption of the protein (found in dairy) and the incidence of type 1 diabetes. The link between A1 beta-casein, cow’s milk, and diabetes was previously confirmed by a study in 2003. The paper notes the possibility that “intensive dairy cattle breeding” may be the cause of milk which has “adverse effects in humans”. Diabetes affects over 30 million adults in America. 1 in 16 people in the UK are living with the disease. In New Zealand, where the paper was partly researched, 5.4% of the population are reported to have diabetes. Publication NZ Farmer highlight one notable example, found in Shanghai. Cases of diabetes increased over 14% between 1997 and 2011. “These increases are mirrored by China’s increased per capita dairy consumption from 6 kilograms in 1992 to 18kg in 2006, and with further substantial increases thereafter. There are no other apparent explanations for this rapid rise in type 1 diabetes in China”. The same publication share that the dairy herds could be bred to produce milk free of the diabetes-linking protein, “but it would take at least 10 years”. Thankfully, recent studies show that younger generations are consuming 550% more plant-based milk. Some alternatives to cow’s milk include almond, oat, rice and soy milk, to name a few. The vegan milk market i Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Milk And Diabetes.

Milk And Diabetes.

Abstract Type 1 diabetes is based on autoimmunity, and its development is in part determined by environmental factors. Among those, milk intake is discussed as playing a pathogenic role. Geographical and temporal relations between type 1 diabetes prevalence and cow's milk consumption have been found in ecological studies. Several case-control studies found a negative correlation between frequency and/or duration of breast-feeding and diabetes, but this was not confirmed by all authors. T-cell and humoral responses related to cow's milk proteins were suggested to trigger diabetes. The different findings of studies in animals and humans as well as the potential underlying mechanisms with regard to single milk proteins (bovine serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein) are discussed in this review. In contrast to type 1 diabetes, the etiology of type 2 diabetes, characterized by insulin resistance is still unclear. In a population with a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the Pima Indians, people who were exclusively breastfed had significantly lower rates of type 2 diabetes than those who were exclusively bottlefed. Studies in lactovegetarians imply that consumption of low fat dairy products is associated with lower incidence and mortality of diabetes and lower blood pressures. In contrast, preference for a diet high in animal fat could be a pathogenic factor, and milk and high fat dairy products contribute considerably to dietary fat intake. Concerning milk fat composition, the opposite effects of various fatty acids (saturated fatty acids, trans-fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid) in vitro, in animals and in humans have to be considered. Continue reading >>

Dairy Products And Type 2 Diabetes: Protective Or Harmful?

Dairy Products And Type 2 Diabetes: Protective Or Harmful?

It is recommended that we should eat dairy products such as milk, cheese and yoghurt as part of a healthy diet. Because these foods are high in protein and calcium, moderate consumption of low-fat dairy products is thought to be important for growth, repair and strong bones. However, some recent studies have suggested that eating dairy products might not be as good for us as previously thought. A study published last week suggested that drinking three or more glasses of milk a day may be linked to increased fracture risk, and a Swedish investigation found a lower incidence of lung, breast and ovarian cancer in those with lactose intolerance – people who avoid consuming dairy products – compared with their lactose-tolerant relatives and the general population. Evidence from a recent meta-analysis suggests that overall dairy product intake protects against the development of type 2 diabetes, but contrasting findings have been reported on the effect of saturated fat found in dairy products on diabetes risk. A high level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the diet is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but recent findings suggest that the specific type of saturated fatty acid – “odd chain” or “even chain” – may be important in determining risk. Can yogurt prevent diabetes? The relationship between dairy products and type 2 diabetes is indeed complex, and in a study published today in BMC Medicine, Frank Hu and colleagues from Harvard School of Public Health addressed the question of which specific dairy products are linked to diabetes risk. The authors analyzed data from three large cohort studies, HPFS, NHS and NHS II, and carried out an updated meta-analysis. Overall, the authors found no association between total dairy consumption and type 2 d Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Not particularly but the fat in whole milk may contribute to obesity which will complicate diabetes. If you must drink milk, drink skim or 1%. By the way, whole (cow's) milk contains 4% fat so 2% is not that much better -- it's not 2% of 4%. Low-fat cheeses and plain yogurt (with or without real fruit) is ok in moderation. Yes. In fact, you can pretty much eat any food if you have diabetes. But you need to know how much of that food you can eat and how often you can eat it. Dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt, contain carbohydrate, along with protein and maybe some fat. Carbohydrate has the most effect on blood glucose, compared to protein and fat. One cup of milk and six ounces of light-style yogurt each contain about 15 grams of carb, about as much as in a slice of bread or a piece of fruit. So if you want to drink milk or eat yogurt, you need to "count" them in your meal plan as one of your carb choices. Other dairy foods, like cheese, eggs and butter are mostly protein and/or fat, so they're counted differently in your meal plan. Cheese and butter tend to be high in saturated fat, a type of fat that can raise cholesterol levels, so it's wise to limit your intake of these foods, and choose lower fat cheeses and trans-fat free tub margarine, instead. Of course, if you have a lactose intolerance or a milk allergy, you may need to avoid some dairy foods. A dietitian can help you figure out how much of any food you can eat, as well as give you guidance on how much carbohydrate, protein and fat to aim for at your meals. Continue reading >>

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

A cold glass of milk invigorates your taste buds and gives you a boost of calcium, but people with diabetes need to be selective with their milk choices. Milk provides important nutrients for bone health, but some varieties contain large amounts of saturated fat and sugar, which should be limited in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day Milk on a Diabetic Diet According to ''Diabetes Forecast,'' a publication from the American Diabetes Association, diabetes increases your chance of developing bone fractures, a risk that increases as you age and lose bone mass. Calcium-rich foods, such as milk, help keep your bones strong and protect against osteoporosis, a serious bone loss that can lead to broken bones and decreased mobility. Since milk contains lactose, a type of sugar, it needs to be counted toward your daily carbohydrate totals. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition plan recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, which includes one serving of dairy. Eight ounces of milk count as one dairy serving. Skim and Low-fat Milk Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, but you can control your risk by limiting your intake of saturated fat. One cup of whole milk provides 149 calories and 5 grams of saturated fat, but 1 cup of skim milk contains only 83 calories and 0.1 gram of saturated fat. If you prefer milk with a thicker texture than skim milk, try 1 percent milk, which has 102 calories and 1.5 grams of saturated fat per cup. All plain milk varieties provide about 12 grams of sugar per cup, but chocolate, strawberry and vanilla milk contain added sugar, so read the food label before purchasing. Benefits of Soy Milk If you do not like regular milk or are lactose intolerant, soy milk makes a healthy alternative. One cup of regular soy milk provides 131 Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Could babies be at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes from drinking formula made from cow's milk? That idea has been circulating for some time but the evidence has been scant and contradictory. A study published Tuesday makes it seem less likely. There are two types of diabetes, and both are on the rise. It's clear that a major driving force behind the increase of Type 2 diabetes, which mainly affects adults, is the eating habits that are also driving the rise of obesity. A much bigger mystery is what has been propelling the increase of Type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile diabetes). This disease usually strikes children and takes hold when a child's immune system starts attacking cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers in Finland have been trying to tease apart the role of cow's milk for many years. In 2010 they published some intriguing results. They looked at antibodies that appear to be part of the Type 1 diabetes process. Studying 230 infants, they found these antibodies were more common in babies who consumed formula produced from cow's milk, compared with babies who were fed a formula in which those milk proteins had been broken down. The results from that small study only suggested that whole proteins from cow's milk are triggering the immune reaction that leads to type 1 diabetes. But if that proved to be the case, there would be an easy way to reduce the risk of the disease: simply make sure baby formula was based on degraded milk proteins rather than whole proteins. To find out whether that would indeed work, the scientists devised a very ambitious experiment, involving 2159 newborns studied at 78 study centers in 15 countries. Half those babies were given formula with regular cow's milk proteins for at least 60 days. The other half go Continue reading >>

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