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Could My Diabetes Diagnosis Be Wrong

An Incorrect Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes

An Incorrect Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes

What happens when you’re diagnosed with type 2 instead of type 1? Everyone has heard of ‘diabetes’ but what they may not be aware of is that there are a few different types of diabetes out there. Each with their own unique circumstances of development and treatment options. Unfortunately, a lot of the more widely known information about diabetes is surrounded by misconceptions which many often come with dangerous advice. There have been way too many reports of Type 1 diabetes misdiagnoses. Even more common is the initial incorrect diagnosis of type 2 diabetes instead of the correct diagnosis of type 1. This vital mistake is an oversight in the medical profession which can have fatal consequences. Let’s first take a look to familiarize ourselves with the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes: What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes was previously referred to as “juvenile diabetes”. It is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own immune system sees the beta cells within the pancreas (responsible for insulin production) as invaders and launches an attack. Type one diabetes more commonly develops in children and adolescents but adults of all ages can also be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. When you have type one diabetes, you are insulin dependent for the rest of your life. This type of treatment regimen consists of multiple shots given daily (MDI) or with an insulin pump attached to your body with an infusion set. This infusion set features a plastic cannula placed right underneath the skin subcutaneously. The insulin pump mimics the function of the human pancreas by giving a background dose of insulin throughout the day (referred to as basal), and allows you to give yourself insulin at mealtime (referred to as bolus). You can read more about di Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes - Diabetes Self-management

Diagnosing Diabetes - Diabetes Self-management

People with diabetes are usually diagnosed in one of a few ways: For Type 1 diabetes, the diagnosis is typically based on symptoms (such as unquenchable thirst, constant urination, weight loss, and fatigue) followed by a blood glucose measurement. For Type 2 diabetes, it is generally based on the results of a fasting plasma glucose test or an oral glucose tolerance test that has been ordered because of risk factors for diabetes. (The HbA1c test is also being considered for use as a diagnostic tool.) In cases where its not clear what type of diabetes a person has, there are other tests that can be done primarily those that look for antibodies in the blood that would indicate an autoimmune condition. However, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are not the only types of diabetes: A few, less common, types exist, some of which are caused by particular genetic defects, and special tests may be necessary to diagnose those types. Last week, the Chicago Tribune published an article about a nine-year-old girl, Lilly Jaffe, who was found to have a rare genetic mutation that caused her diabetes. In the three years since this discovery, 70 others nationwide were found to have the same mutation, which causes a form of diabetes (known as a monogenic diabetes, since it is caused by one gene) that can be treated with an oral drug rather than insulin despite the outward appearance of Type 1 diabetes. At the urging of the researchers who discovered Lillys condition, the state of Illinois passed a law last month requiring doctors to register all children who develop diabetes before they are 12 months old in a database. (This type of diabetes almost always occurs within the first six months of life.) The researchers hope that by analyzing the database, likely cases of Lillys type of monogenic dia Continue reading >>

Why Is Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed?

Why Is Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed?

Many people with Type 1 share a similar diagnosis story. They display all the classic symptoms (extreme thirst, weight loss, frequent urination, nausea) and were fortunate enough to be accurately diagnosed by their primary care doctor. However, some people with Type 1 are not as fortunate to quickly receive a correct diagnosis. It is important to remember that the only way to have an accurate diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes is to test for the diabetes-related (islet) autoantibodies. If ICA, GADA, and/or IA-2A are present in a person with diabetes symptoms, then you have confirmation that the diagnosis is Type 1 diabetes. If IAA is present in a child with diabetes who is not using insulin, then the diagnosis is Type 1 instead of Type 2. If no diabetes-related autoantibodies are present, then it is unlikely that the diagnosis is Type 1 diabetes. Only in extremely rare incidents does someone have Type 1 and does not develop detectable amounts of islet autoantibodies. Some people who have Type 1 diabetes will never develop detectable amounts of islet autoantibodies, but this is rare. Approximately, 95% or more of people with new-onset Type 1 diabetes will have at least one islet autoantibody (labtestsonline.org). The following are some conditions and ailments that people are often misdiagnosed with after first experiencing symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. A misdiagnosis can be extremely dangerous and in some cases, fatal. Type 2 diabetes A common misdiagnosis is the other “type”: Type 2 diabetes, as most of the early symptoms are the same or very similar to that of a Type 1 diagnosis. Depending on your current state of health, weight fluctuations, eating habits, and other factors – a medical professional may wrongly assume that you are suffering from Type 2. Read Grace Bonne Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed In Many Adults

Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed In Many Adults

Many might think type 1 diabetes is a "disease of childhood", but research, published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, has found it has similar prevalence in adults. More than 40% of Britons diagnosed with the condition are over 30. Many of these are initially diagnosed with type 2, and receiving the wrong treatment can be life-threatening. Charity Diabetes UK is calling for doctors not to rule out the possibility a patient over 30 might have type 1. 'Banging my head against a wall' Helen Philibin, a mother of two from Torquay, who was 40, slim and active when she was diagnosed. She said: "Having the wrong diagnosis was extremely frustrating. I just knew it wasn't right. "I'm always running around with my two young kids and I walk the dog every day." She visited her GP complaining of extreme thirst. A blood test strongly indicated she had diabetes. Her doctor diagnosed her with type 2 and prescribed metformin, the most commonly-used drug for the condition. She was also sent on a course to learn about lifestyle factors including a low-sugar diet. "All the other people on the course were in their mid-60s and overweight. I was 5ft 10in and nine-and-a-half stone. I stood out like a sore thumb," said Helen. "When I raised it with nurses or my GP, I was told that type 1 diabetes is always diagnosed in childhood, so I had to be type 2. I felt like I was banging my head against a wall." Helen changed her diet to get better blood sugar control - but she began vomiting up to four times a week. "It was horrible," she said. "Even a single piece of toast would send my blood sugar levels through the roof and I was losing even more weight." Helen's story isn't unique. According to the new report, misdiagnosis may be a surprisingly common occurrence in the UK. The team analysed Continue reading >>

100,000 'received Wrong Diabetes Diagnosis'

100,000 'received Wrong Diabetes Diagnosis'

100,000 'received wrong diabetes diagnosis' Around 100,000 people in England have been diagnosed with the wrong type of diabetes or told they have the disease when they do not, according to research. A report found "substantial evidence" that people are being miscoded, misclassified and misdiagnosed with diabetes on GP lists. For every 500 people identified with diabetes on a GP register, about 65 to 70 could need to be looked at again for some sort of error. Experts from the Royal College of GPs and NHS Diabetes have now published new guidance aimed at improving the way the disease is recorded. One of the experts behind the report, Professor Simon de Lusignan from the University of Surrey, said the team accepted around 50,000 people are diagnosed with diabetes but do not have it, and another 50,000 are classified with the wrong type. This means some people will have been told they have Type 2 diabetes when in fact they have Type 1, and vice versa. Some of the errors are caused by mistakes made when entering information, but some are down to a lack of understanding among doctors or other staff, the report said. The growth in obesity has also made it more difficult to differentiate between Type 2, which is linked to unhealthy lifestyles, and Type 1. Such errors can have a "considerable impact on patient care" while "accurate diagnosis is critical for the appropriate treatment for the person with diabetes", the report said. It said "the most widespread misunderstanding" among health professionals was changing somebody's diagnosis from Type 2 to Type 1 when they go on to insulin. "This, potentially, could have a considerable impact on patient care as the guidelines for insulin use in Type 2 are very different from those in Type 1." Pilot audits from five GP practices in S Continue reading >>

Wrong Diabetes Diagnosis.

Wrong Diabetes Diagnosis.

On Monday, the Wall Street Journal (look at me, linking to a real publication instead of a Strongbad email) had an article about doctors misdiagnosing type 1 diabetes in adults. I posted a link to the article, called "Wrong Call: The Trouble Diagnosing Diabetes," on my Facebook page and received several comments from people who went through a similar misdiagnosis. They have offered to share some of their story here, and I'm hopeful that their words will help someone else in a similar situation. The Initial Symptoms. Jessica, diagnosed at age 26, was already familiar with type 1 diabetes. "My diagnosis story actually begins with my husband, diagnosed with type 1 on his 21st birthday. Fortunately he was diagnosed correctly and quickly, and we were able to get him all of the help he needed." She described hitting a wall of thirst and exhaustion that set in when her son was nine months old. "These symptoms continued for about a week, and mostly only bothered me at night. During the day, although I was tired, I wasn't going to the bathroom constantly or super thirsty." Lindsay had a similar experience, just before she turned 27. "I was just a few weeks s hy of my 27th birthday. I had been sick a long time with weight loss, hair loss, you name it. I ended up with intense upper GI pain that couldn't be ignored, so my mom took me to the ER where the symptoms were investigated with an ultrasound, blood work, etc. The doctor came back to report that I had 'viral gastritis, likely due to your increased blood glucose level, which is 277. Now, because of your age, you'll be considered a type 2.' Love that one, eh?? My mom and I sat stunned; my dad had JUST been diagnosed with type 2 three weeks before." Sarah also sang the same symptoms tune: "The morning of February 22, 2007 I woke Continue reading >>

Can Prediabetes Be Incorrect???

Can Prediabetes Be Incorrect???

I am a 52 year old female, 5' 6", 122-125 lbs. Blood pressure almost always under 110/70. Nobody in my family has had diabetes, although my dad died of pancreatic cancer (could that be related?) I had 6 children, and they were all smaller than 9 lbs (avg. 7.3) Cholesterol 211, Trig. 87, HDL 88, Low Den 106 I am in the best shape of my life. I exercise at least 11 hours per week, strenuously. I run several marathons a year, and do some serious mountain climbing. That said, up till now I could eat anything and everything I wanted and I ate a lot of carbs. My Hb1ac is 5.3, but my fasting blood glucose ranges 100-105. When I have really really cut my carbs, I've gotten my FBG lower, even 88 one day. But with my training, it is really tough to stop eating everything but meat and veges. I don't know if I can do it. My postprandial numbers seem entirely normal: after eating a boiled potato (which was suggested as a test): before, 86; 1 hr 133. 2 hrs 108, 3 hrs 88 My post exercise numbers are always higher than before I exercise. When I crossfit, blood glucose rises from 103 before to 140; running for 5 miles, usually raises my bs just a few points. Long slow hikes with 60 lb pack, though, it goes down into the 80s. I had a beer before going out to dinner for thai bbq chicken and soup and some cabbage salad and after dinner my BG was 66. Isn't reactive hypoglycemia another symptom? I am also going through menopause, and it is not fun. My doctor gave me microestrogen a month ago for the insomnia/hot flashes, only other thing I take is calcium tablets. My husband says ignore the results, but I am really nervous, as I am scheduled to do Everest next spring. If I'm already exercising and at a good weight, doesn't that mean this is even more serious than for someone else? If anyone Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Adults Diagnosed With The Wrong Type, With ‘life-threatening Effects'

Diabetes Symptoms: Adults Diagnosed With The Wrong Type, With ‘life-threatening Effects'

Adults are just as likely to develop type 1 diabetes as children, according to researchers at the University of Exeter. There is a misconception among some doctors that type 1 diabetes can only be diagnosed in childhood, they said. Adults that are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, when they actually have type 1, face “life-threatening” consequences, they added. Doctors were urged by charity Diabetes UK to not rule out type 1 diabetes after the age of 30. Type 1 diabetes patients need insulin injections to control blood sugar levels, as their immune system destroys the cells which makes the hormone. Diet changes and medication may be enough to control the condition in type 2 diabetes patients, though. If type 1 patients don’t receive enough insulin, they could suffer drowsiness, blurred vision and extreme thirst. It can also lead to diabetic ketoacidosis - a serious condition where the body begins to break down fat and muscle as an alternative energy source. Ketoacidosis can cause vomiting, a build-up of acids in blood, and even death. More than 40 per cent of type 1 cases occurred in people over 30, the researchers revealed. Type 2 accounts for 96 per cent of all diabetes cases diagnosed between 31 and 60 year old patients. One in nine adults with onset type 1 diabetes were hospitalised with the lethal condition, diabetic ketoacidosis, because they weren’t given insulin. “Diabetes textbooks for doctors say that type 1 diabetes is a childhood illness. But our study shows that it is prevalent throughout life,” said researcher Dr Richard Oram. “The assumption among many doctors is that adults presenting with the symptoms of diabetes will have type 2, but this misconception can lead to misdiagnosis with potentially serious consequences. “The Prime Minister is Continue reading >>

7 Mistakes Doctors Are Making With Diabetes

7 Mistakes Doctors Are Making With Diabetes

A few years back I was caring for my cousin who suffered from diabetes. During this time, I learned a lot about mistakes doctors are making with diabetes. Now, this isn’t to put down doctors in any way. Doctors are people too. My cousin wasn’t very good at talking to his doctor and this contributed to medical error as well. My cousin was diagnosed in his twenties with Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes. The period of time in the 20’s is a gray area between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It can still be one or the other. It was pretty obvious it was Type 1 since there was a strong family history and we are Native American – as you probably know already, Native Americans are at a greater risk for developing diabetes. We knew his diagnosis was correct, plus he needed insulin. He had a very good physician who had been treating our entire family for endocrine disease for many years. Then, my cousin moved away and got a new job. He did the normal thing anyone would do when moving; he ordered his records and found a new physician. This led to a whole slew of miscommunications and treatment changes that led to my cousin going downhill. Here are a few things that could go wrong with your diabetes treatment: 1. Type 1/Type 2 Diabetes Confusion This can happen either early on in your diagnosis of diabetes or if you switch medical providers. Even if you are admitted to the hospital, there may be changes in your records or care for the wrong type. Explanation: My cousin was first diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes as his pancreas were still working some. His first doctor realized that he did in fact have Type 1 diabetes and noted that in his chart. When he moved, he handed over his records to his new doctor. The new doctor only looked at the first few pages of his chart and presumed he had T Continue reading >>

Can I Prove The Dr's Wrong?

Can I Prove The Dr's Wrong?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community They think I am in the honeymoon period and will be on insulin within weeks / months. Since my diagnosis last September I have followed my diabetic consultant and D-nurse specialist advice and through better diet and monitoring my sugar levels prior to eating managed to get my sugar levels just under NHS guidelines. The dr & nurses have been great, and from what I have established since, all their advise tallies with NHS diabetes guidelines...... But...... Although diagnosed T2, upon further research I felt I was LADA (not overweight, loosing weight, age 58) so asked for a GAD test, which was very high and showed that I am, and thus heading to T1, insulin dependent. Some experts think there are more LADA than T1. More research..... My pancreas beta cells are dying off and since these cells produce the insulin I need, my insulin generation is worsening by the day... Why?.... My dr and nurses say they have no idea, genetic make up, just happens. But I read that there is a strong medical case that it is high blood sugar levels that kills beta cells, and that this occurs within hours of eating..... Too many carbs (jacket potato lunches) in the past?? Just over two weeks ago I decided to check my sugar levels 1 hour after each meal. Much higher than I thought. Mostly 10+, and above the levels of 7.8 that some trials indicate beta cells destruction begins....... If I am to stop this beta cell destruction I need to keep 1 hr after meal readings below 7.8....... Is this possible? After three weeks of trying, I have found it currently is. No potatoes, smaller quantities of basmati rice, and just one slice of whole grain bread at a time.... Low carb meals. My B Continue reading >>

How I Was Misdiagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes In My 40’s

How I Was Misdiagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes In My 40’s

How I Was Misdiagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes In My 40’s Written By: Erin Clausen In my 42 years leading up to my Type 1 diabetes diagnosis, I’d never been the type of person to get sick much at all. An occasional cold every couple of years. Maybe a quick 24-hour flu a couple of times in my entire life. My immune system always seemed to function incredibly well. Better than most I’d always thought. Eight months before my diagnosis, I had the flu. It was the most awful three days. I couldn’t keep anything down. My bones ached miserably. A seemingly inescapable relentless aching that made me want to scream. I could do nothing but hope to sleep in between diarrhea, vomiting, and dry heaves. In the months that followed that horrible flu. I noticed I wasn’t feeling up to par. I started having to use the bathroom in the middle if the night. Where before, I almost never got up to pee during the night. It soon became two to three times a night. I also noticed that I was often very thirsty. I would wake up every couple of hours and drink from the 32-ounce glass of water on my nightstand. I even started to run out halfway through the night and needed to refill my cup. Then the frequent urination became five to six times a night. The conversations I’d have in my mind every time I’d wake up needing to pee went like this. “Dammit Erin, stop drinking so much water and you won’t have to pee so much!” or “I wonder if I should see my doctor about overactive bladder issues?” I had also been losing weight easily. I chalked it up to the fact that I was a massage therapist and I expended a ton of energy during the day working on clients. I even wore a fitness activity/calorie burn monitor. It confirmed that I was burning a lot of calories. In hindsight, my job and leve Continue reading >>

Some Type 1 Diabetes Cases In Adults Misdiagnosed As Type 2

Some Type 1 Diabetes Cases In Adults Misdiagnosed As Type 2

Some type 1 diabetes cases in adults misdiagnosed as type 2 Some type 1 diabetes cases in adults misdiagnosed as type 2 Doctors 'wrong to assume type 1 diabetes is childhood illness', says The Guardian. This follows a study looking at a large number of adults in the UK to see if they had diabetes and if so, which type of the condition they had. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, so is reliant on life-long insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the person produces limited insulin, or their body can't use it so well. It can be managed in the early stages with changes to diet and medication. Type 1 diabetes is often thought of as a childhood illness as most people are diagnosed at a young age. For this reason, people who develop diabetes as adults are often assumed to have type 2. Perhaps the most famous example is Prime Minister Theresa May who was, at first, misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013, when in fact further tests revealed she had type 1. This study looked at 13,250 people diagnosed with diabetes at a range of ages. Of all people who developed type 1 diabetes, surprisingly 42% were not diagnosed until after the age of 30. However, only 4% of all newly diagnosed diabetes in the over 30s were type 1. Therefore, although type 1 diabetes starting in adulthood is uncommon, it still highlights the need for healthcare professionals to be aware that not all people who develop diabetes in adulthood automatically have type 2. Making sure that people receive the correct diagnosis, and therefore the correct treatment, is crucial. If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes but are not responding to treatment, it may be worth discussing the possibility of further testing w Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnoses Might Be Wrong

Type 2 Diabetes Diagnoses Might Be Wrong

By now, everyone who’s interested knows that there are 2 main types of diabetes — type 1(in which the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin) and type 2 (in which body tissues don’t or can’t respond appropriately to insulin), typically seen in adults. But many of us, and apparently even some doctors, don’t know about or properly diagnose type 3c, now known as diabetes of the exocrine pancreas. First, a little background information is appropriate. The pancreas is a multi- function organ. Its beta cells produce insulin and the alpha cells produce another hormone — glucagon. In addition to these endocrine products (1), the pancreas also has an exocrine (2) function — when food enters the small intestine, the pancreas secretes bicarbonate to counteract the acid from the stomach, as well as digestive enzymes that break down fats and proteins. Without those products, normal digestion can’t occur. When the pancreas is damaged by disease or its structure altered by surgery, both exocrine and endocrine functions are often disrupted — and diabetes can result. This diabetes is often diagnosed in middle-aged persons, and they can easily be seen as having type 2 diabetes. But that’s not necessarily the case, and it’s important for a correct diagnosis so that the condition can be treated appropriately. Dr. Chris Woodmansy from the University of Surrey in the UK and several colleagues performed a retrospective analysis of over 2 million patients’ records in England. They were interested in learning how many new (incident) cases of adult-onset diabetes were diagnosed between the years of 2005 and 2016, how many were likely to be type 1, 2, or 3c diabetes and how they were classified by the treating physician. Their report was published in Diabetes Care. Over that p Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: 'i Was Misdiagnosed By My Doctor' - Kidspot

Gestational Diabetes: 'i Was Misdiagnosed By My Doctor' - Kidspot

On the day I was booked in for my three-hour glucose tolerance test I woke feeling like death. Already two and a half weeks into battling a severe flu you know the pee-yourself-coughing kind juggling a toddler and severe sleep deprivation due to the constant coughing and blocked sinuses, I knew I was about to endure the longest three hours of my life. With the drink down the hatch, and only the first of three blood samples taken, I already had the sense all was not right. I was far more affected physically than the last time and needed to lie down immediately to keep me from fainting. I managed to keep the drink down and had blood drawn two more times. I left relieved it was over, but instinctively knowing this was not the end of the saga. The following Monday, I receive a call from my obstetricians office. I am on the set of a photoshoot and busy instructing the photographer where to set up, briefing the hair and makeup artist and getting the looks I will style on the model ready. I answer my phone and its the obstetricians secretary. We exchange hellos and then she says, you have gestational diabetes. I am completely taken by surprise, and was left speechless as she tells me she is booking me in to see an endocrinologist ASAP and they will be in touch to let me know about the diet I need to start on straight away and the apparatus I will need to buy to test my blood daily at multiple times. We hang up and I stand shell-shocked, tears flow as I ring my husband and tell him the news. Then I think about it, I was so sick the day I had the test, could that have skewed the results? I ring my obstetrician back and pose my theory, and request a retest. He declines and insists that I continue with the next course of action. With an appointment to see the endocrinologist lock Continue reading >>

Adults Being Diagnosed With Wrong Diabetes

Adults Being Diagnosed With Wrong Diabetes

Adults are just as likely to develop type 1 diabetes as children, a study has revealed. The autoimmune condition is often considered a ‘disease of childhood’ and is commonly referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’. But experts at the University of Exeter have found 40 per cent of new cases occur after the age of 30. The researchers warned many adults are misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes, a completely different condition which is treated in a different way. The Prime Minister of Britain, Theresa May, who developed type 1 diabetes in 2013 at the age of 56, is one of those who has fallen victim to the confusion. She was initially told she had type 2 diabetes and given tablets which did not control her blood sugar. The scientists, whose work is published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, found it takes a year on average for adults with type 1 diabetes to be diagnosed correctly. Dr Richard Oram of the University of Exeter said: ‘Diabetes textbooks for doctors say that type 1 diabetes is a childhood illness. ‘But our study shows that it is prevalent throughout life. ‘The assumption among many doctors is that adults presenting with the symptoms of diabetes will have type 2 but this misconception can lead to misdiagnosis with potentially serious consequences. The Prime Minister is an example of someone who was misdiagnosed in this way at first. This study should raise awareness that type 1 diabetes occurs throughout adulthood and should be considered as a diagnosis.’ Type 1 diabetes is an irreversible autoimmune disease which usually strikes in childhood, and stops the body producing insulin. Its cause is unclear, but it is thought to be genetic. The only treatment is insulin injections, which have to be taken several times a day for the rest of a pati Continue reading >>

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