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Could Fish Oil Cause Diabetes

What Are The Dangers Of Fish Oil Caps?

What Are The Dangers Of Fish Oil Caps?

Fish oil benefits your health by boosting your intake of essential nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin A. Omega-3 fatty acid consumption lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease, helps control diabetes and and might also help prevent osteoporosis, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Too much fish oil, however, poses a health risk, because overconsumption of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin A leads to harmful side effects. Over-consuming fish oil capsules poses a health risk because of their ability to cause excessive bleeding. Fish oil thins your blood, preventing blood clot formation. When consumed in moderate amounts, this blood-thinning effect offers a health advantage, protecting you from spontaneous blood clot formation that endangers your health. If you consume too many fish oil capsules, or you combine fish oil supplements with blood-thinning medications, your body may no longer be able to form clots effectively, leading to a bleeding disorder. If you take blood thinners, bruise easily or suffer from a bleeding disorder, take caution when consuming fish oil capsules. Consuming fish oil caps might also affect your blood sugar levels, posing a health risk to some individuals. People with diabetes already face difficulty controlling their blood sugar levels, either because they do not produce blood sugar-lowering insulin, or their body does not efficiently respond to insulin. Taking fish oil may increase fasting blood sugar levels in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, reports the University of Maryland Medical Center. If you have diabetes, make sure you talk to your doctor before taking fish oil caps to avoid high blood sugar. Some types of fish oil caps -- such as those containing cod liver oil -- provide large amounts of vitam Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Fish Oil In Diabetes

Side Effects Of Fish Oil In Diabetes

Fish oil, a supplement rich in omega-3 fatty acids frequently touted for its protective effects on the heart, isn't right for everyone. In fact, fish oil may cause negative side effects particularly when used by people with diabetes -- a condition characterized by unusually high blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, be sure to talk with your primary care provider before beginning treatment with fish oil supplements. Video of the Day Elevated Blood Sugar The omega-3 fatty acids present in fish oil may raise your blood sugar level. An increase in blood sugar levels can be particularly harmful for people who already have diabetes. If your diabetes is controlled by medication, you may begin to experience diabetes symptoms again while taking fish oil supplements. Such symptoms include increased urination and thirst, sudden weight loss, fatigue and blurred vision. Seek prompt care from your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms, especially if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels may cause severe and permanent kidney and nerve damage. Diabetes Drug Interaction Always discuss all medications you are currently taking with your primary medical provider before beginning treatment with dietary or herbal supplements, including fish oil. The blood sugar raising effects of fish oil may reduce the efficacy of any diabetes medications you are currently taking, including glipizide, metformin, glyburide or insulin, the University of Maryland Medical Center warns. Consequently, your doctor may need to increase the amount of diabetes medication you take each day to counteract the blood sugar effects of fish oil. People with diabetes may also experience side effects that are common among most people during treatment with fish oil supplement Continue reading >>

Fabulous Fish Oil Findings: Part 3

Fabulous Fish Oil Findings: Part 3

Weve covered a lot of information about omega-3 fatty acids over the past two weeks . Today well wrap up the three-part series by looking at fish-oil supplements, as well as the potential side effects and safety issues that surround them. Why would someone want to take fish-oil supplements? Well, if youre like me, I happen to dislike seafood, with the exception of a tuna sandwich and the occasional piece of swordfish. Or maybe you love fish but live in an area where its hard to get fresh, high-quality seafood. Or it may be that you take fish-oil supplements for health insurance purposes. Remember, too, that if you have heart disease or have high triglycerides , the amount of omega-3s that you need can be difficult to get from eating fish alone. Whatever the reason, more and more people are turning to supplements (of all kinds). How do you go about choosing a fish-oil supplement? First off, stay clear of taking cod-liver oil. This oil, which some of you may remember having to choke down during your childhoods, is a highly concentrated source of both vitamins A and D. Too much of either of these fat-soluble vitamins can be dangerous. Also, cod-liver oil is obviously made from the cods liver. The liver is the bodys filter and can harbor toxins, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic pollutants that are frequently found in the fatty tissue of animals and fish. Second, make sure you choose a supplement that contains both EPA and DHA, the two types of omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil. Menhaden, sardines, anchovies, halibut, salmon, and mackerel are commonly used to make supplements. Most fish-oil supplements come in gelatin capsule form and are usually odorless, tasteless, and easy to swallow. (However, avoid taking any supplement that smells rancid or fishy. Continue reading >>

Why Does Cod Liver Oil Raise My Blood Sugar?

Why Does Cod Liver Oil Raise My Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Why does cod liver oil raise my blood sugar? Hi all, About 4 years ago I started taking omega 3 capsules/oil but I found that my need for insulin increased and made blood sugar control really hard so I experimented with different brands etc. but with no luck so I just stayed off it. Lately I've been trying to increase my vitamin D levels and so decided to give cod liver oil a go but unfortunately the same thing has happened. The day after starting on it, my blood sugar shot up and I'm now injecting a lot more than usual. It's like having insulin resistance. I've searched on google but not really found anything. I do remember reading on this forum of someone else who cannot tolerate fish oils but have had no luck in my search. I think I'll just have to accept I cannot take fish oils but I would love to know the science behind why it affects some diabetics in this way. Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Treating And Preventing Diabetes With Omega-3?

Treating And Preventing Diabetes With Omega-3?

In recent years, diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. Globally, it is estimated that 387 million people are living with diabetes and the number is expected to rapidly rise in the upcoming years. Diabetes is a chronic and dangerous disease, and it is becoming almost excepted that developing it is a part of growing older, just like going grey. However, it doesn’t have to be this way, as the latest research is clearly showing. The role that diet and lifestyle play in the development of diabetes is no very clear. In fact, you can even go as far as saying that diet and lifestyle are the cause of type II diabetes. One of the key dietary components in avoiding and treating diabetes is the level of omega-3 in your diet. Diabetes, by plain definition, is a condition where insulin production or efficiency is impaired. The way in which the insulin function is impaired depends on the type of diabetes and there are two types: Type 1. Also known as Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, this is normally found in children and is predominately caused by genetics. With this type of diabetes, the immune system has destroyed the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. The body is then no longer able to break down glucose due to having an insulin deficiency. The main treatment for Type 1 diabetes is insulin injections. Type 2. This type is, by far, the most common. It’s characterized by cells becoming less sensitive to insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance, which means the cells can’t interact with glucose to properly absorb it and break it down. In response, the pancreas will often increase insulin production, which leads to having both too much glucose and too much insulin in the body. The excess demand placed on the pancreas over time may cause metabolic da Continue reading >>

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

In the past two years, six separate meta-analyses have been published on the relationship between fish consumption and type 2 diabetes. The whole point of a meta-analysis is to compile the best studies done to date and see what the overall balance of evidence shows. The fact that there are six different ones published recently highlights how open the question remains. One thread of consistency, though, was that fish consumers in the United States tended to be at greater risk for diabetes. If we include Europe, then fish eaters appeared to have a 38% increased risk of diabetes. On a per serving basis, that comes out to be about a 5% increase in risk for every serving of fish one has per week. To put that into perspective, a serving of red meat per day is associated with 19% increase in risk. Just one serving per day of fish would be equivalent to a 35% increase in risk. But why might fish be worse than red meat? Fish intake may increase type 2 diabetes risk by increasing blood sugar levels, as a review of the evidence commissioned by the U.S. government found. The review found that blood sugars increase in diabetics given fish oil. Another possible cause is that omega 3’s appear to cause oxidative stress. A recent study, highlighted in my video, Fish and Diabetes, found that the insulin producing cells in the pancreas don’t appear to work as well in people who eat two or more servings of fish a week. Or it may not be related to omega 3’s at all but rather the environmental contaminants that build up in fish. It all started with Agent Orange. We sprayed 20 million gallons of the stuff on Vietnam, and some of it was contaminated with trace amounts of dioxins. Though the Red Cross estimates that a million Vietnamese were adversely affected, what about all the servicem Continue reading >>

5 Excellent Benefits Of Fish Oil For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Excellent Benefits Of Fish Oil For Type 2 Diabetes

Derived from the fatty tissues of certain oily fish, fish oil contains the essential omega-3 fatty acids – eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA). These fatty acids are well known to be essential to human health, and they have some particularly great benefits for those with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. Research surrounding fish oil is extremely promising – from protective effects against coronary heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer, to aiding in diabetes management. Among the many benefits of omega-3s, the one that stands out the most is their ability to help fight inflammation in the body. Being that diabetes is partly an inflammatory condition, you will soon find out how it helps improve various outcomes for you. DISCLAIMER Please note that this information is not an endorsement for fish oil. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor. How fish oil works As already mentioned, fish oil provides a mighty dose of omega-3 fatty acids. And one of the main functions of omega-3 fatty acids is their ability to reduce inflammation. Inflammation is a complex process that occurs on a cellular level in your body. As a result of different stimulus, inflammatory cells are triggered in a long series of chemical reactions. These reactions involve critical immune cells that either increase or decrease the inflammation that is occuring in our bodies. In fact, inflammation is controlled in our bodies through a balance in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules. And this is where omega-3 fish oil lends a helping hand. Omega-3 fatty acids work by up-regulating (increasing) the expression (release) of the anti-inflammatory molecules. As a result this reduces inflammation in your body, Continue reading >>

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

A type of polyunsaturated fat believed to have multiple health benefits. Omega-3 fatty acids get their name from the structure of their molecules, in which the first of several double bonds occurs three carbon atoms away from the end of the carbon chain. There are three types of omega-3 fatty acids: Alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) is found in vegetable sources, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) come from fish and other marine life. Research has suggested that consuming omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oils could protect a person from coronary heart disease. For example, some studies have shown that Greenland Eskimos, who consume a lot of seal and whale meat, have much lower blood cholesterol levels, lower triglyceride levels, and lower rates of coronary artery disease than people living in Denmark (who consume less fish). Other studies have shown that men who ate fish at least once a week had a lower mortality rate from coronary artery disease than men who ate none. Other potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acids have also emerged from scientific studies, including the following: • Diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may decrease insulin resistance in people with diabetes. • Diets high in omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of heart attacks, stroke, macular degeneration, and certain types of cancer. • Those who consume more fish appear to have lower rates of depression, and omega-3 supplements, when used in conjunction with conventional medical therapy, may be helpful in treating bipolar disorder (also known as manic depression) and schizophrenia. • Omega-3 supplements have been shown to improve symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Health experts agree t Continue reading >>

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm.

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm.

Abstract Fish oils, containing omega-3 fatty acids (omega 3FAs), favorably influence plasma lipoproteins in nondiabetic humans and prevent the development of insulin resistance induced by fat feeding in rats. We studied the effects of fish oils in 10 subjects (aged 42-65 yr) with mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Subjects were fed a standard diabetic diet plus 1) no supplementation (baseline), 2) 10 g fish oil concentrate (30% omega 3FAs) daily, and 3) 10 g safflower oil daily over separate 3-wk periods, the latter two supplements being given in radom order by use of a double-blind crossover design. At the end of each diet period, fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin, and lipids were measured, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp performed with [3-3H]glucose. FBG increased 14% during fish oil and 11% during safflower oil supplementation compared with baseline (P less than .05), whereas body weight, fasting serum insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity were unchanged. The absolute increase in FBG during each supplementation period correlated with the baseline FBG (fish oil, r = .83, P less than .005); safflower oil, r = .75, P = .012). Fasting plasma triglyceride levels decreased during fish oil supplementation in the 4 subjects with baseline hypertriglyceridemia (greater than 2 mM) but were not significantly reduced overall. There was no significant change in fasting plasma total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In summary, dietary fish oil supplementation adversely affected glycemic control in NIDDM subjects without producing significant beneficial effects on plasma lipids. The effect of safflower oil supplementation was not significantly different from fish oil, sugg Continue reading >>

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm

Effects Of Fish Oil Supplementation On Glucose And Lipid Metabolism In Niddm

Fish oils, containing omega-3 fatty acids (ω3FAs), favorably influence plasma lipoproteins in nondiabetic humans and prevent the development of insulin resistance induced by fat feeding in rats. We studied the effects of fish oils in 10 subjects (aged 42–65 yr) with mild non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Subjects were fed a standard diabetic diet plus 1) no supplementation (baseline), 2) 10 g fish oil concentrate (30% ω3FAs) daily, and 3) 10 g safflower oil daily over separate 3-wk periods, the latter two supplements being given in radom order by use of a double-blind crossover design. At the end of each diet period, fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin, and lipids were measured, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp performed with [3-3H]glucose. FBG increased 14% during fish oil and 11% during safflower oil supplementation compared with baseline (P < .05), whereas body weight, fasting serum insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity were unchanged. The absolute increase in FBG during each supplementation period correlated with the baseline FBG (fish oil, r = .83, P < .005; safflower oil, r = .75, P = .012). Fasting plasma triglyceride levels decreased during fish oil supplementation in the 4 subjects with baseline hypertriglyceridemia (>2 mM) but were not significantly reduced overall. There was no significant change in fasting plasma total, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In summary, dietary fish oil supplementation adversely affected glycemic control in NIDDM subjects without producing significant beneficial effects on plasma lipids. The effect of safflower oil supplementation was not significantly different from fish oil, suggesting that the negative effects on glucose Continue reading >>

Far From Fin-ished: Fish Oil May Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes, But Link Unclear

Far From Fin-ished: Fish Oil May Help Fight Type 2 Diabetes, But Link Unclear

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2013 — There’s something fishy about the news that omega-3 supplements may help fight type 2 diabetes. Researchers believe fish oil can help with glucose regulation, but they don't yet understand whether it has a direct impact on type 2 diabetes development, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health reviewed data from 14 studies involving 1,323 subjects to determine the effects of fish oil supplements on diabetes risk factors. In total, 682 subjects had taken fish oil supplements. The researchers found that fish oil was associated with an increase in the level of the hormone adiponectin – which effects glucose regulation and inflammation. Their findings confirmed previous animal studies that also found fish oil can raise the level of adiponectin in the bloodstream. Scott Drab, PharmD., CDE, BC-ADM, associate professor of pharmacy and therapeutics at the University of Pittsburgh, says people with diabetes can benefit from taking fish oil supplements. “Fish oil has anti-inflammatory properties, and because insulin resistance is associated with inflammation, we recommend fish oil to our patients,” said Dr. Drab. “Anything used as an anti-inflammatory can help glucose levels.” Miracle Cure for Diabetes It may help glucose levels, but the authors of the Harvard study were not convinced that the increase in adiponectin levels associated with fish oil could directly prevent type 2 diabetes. "Although higher levels of adiponectin in the bloodstream have been linked to lower risk of diabetes, whether fish oil influences glucose metabolism and development of type 2 diabetes remains unclear," said the study's lead author, Jason Wu, PhD, in a press release Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

Fish Oil Pills Might Cut Diabetes Risk

Fish Oil Pills Might Cut Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter supplements could help reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. The supplements, also known as omega-3 fatty acids, increase levels of a hormone called adiponectin that's linked to insulin sensitivity, Harvard researchers found. Higher levels of this hormone in the bloodstream have also been linked to a lower risk for heart disease. "While prior animal studies found fish oil increased circulating adiponectin, whether similar effects apply in humans is not established," the study's lead author, Jason Wu, from the Harvard School of Public Health, said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. For their study, the researchers conducted a "meta-analysis" of 14 clinical trials. A meta-analysis reviews existing research and attempts to find a consistent pattern. In this case, the studies that were reviewed were all randomized, placebo-controlled trials, which is considered the gold standard in research. "By reviewing evidence from existing randomized clinical trials, we found that fish oil supplementation caused modest increases in adiponectin in the blood of humans," Wu explained. Overall, the new study looked at 682 people who took fish oil supplements, and 641 who were given placebos such as sunflower or olive oil. Among the people treated with fish oil, adiponectin levels increased by 0.37 micrograms per milliliter of blood. This hormone plays a beneficial role in processes that affect metabolism, such as blood sugar regulation and inflammation. Because the effects of fish oil varied significantly in the studies analyzed, the researchers suggested that omega-3 fatty acids could have a stronger effect in certain groups of people. The investigators concluded that more research is needed to determine which people would benefit most f Continue reading >>

Fish Oil May Help With Diabetic Neuropathy

Fish Oil May Help With Diabetic Neuropathy

Omega-3 fatty acids in found to improved nerve damage in mice with type 1 and type 2… Approximately 50 percent of patients with diabetes suffer from nerve damage, or neuropathy. No cure exists, and the most effective treatment, keeping blood sugar in control, only slows neuropathy. But a new study shows that fish oil supplements can restore the condition of nerves damaged from diabetes in mice. “Diabetic neuropathy is a very costly and debilitating complication of diabetes. It is the leading cause of foot ulcers and nontrauma-related amputations, and the impact of diabetic neuropathy on the patient and family are unmeasurable,” said Mark Yorek of the VA Medical Center in Iowa City, the study’s lead investigator. Fish oil is an attractive treatment approach because “supplements are considered very safe and could be easily translated into everyday care. Fish oil would be easy to take, like a vitamin, and should have few side effects when combined with other medications,” explained Yorek. Previous studies of obesity and diabetes have reported better blood sugar handling, liver function and reduced inflammation with omega-3 fatty acids treatment. The health benefits were attributed to protective molecules produced from omega-3 fatty acids, including one type called resolvins. The research group had previously observed that diets enriched with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil improved diabetic neuropathy in mice with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and in this new study they examined why. Researchers used a mouse model of diabetes to study the effect of fish oil. Diabetic mice were fed a high-fat diet and treated with daily injections of resolvin or given a high-fat diet in which half the fat came from fish oil. The results were compared to healthy, non-diabetic mic Continue reading >>

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