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Cough Syrup For Diabetics

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

Over The Counter Cough Medicine And Diabetes: A Safe Approach

The “common cold” may cause some patients with diabetes to worry about elevations in their blood sugar. When you get sick, your body is under a lot of stress. Your body tries to make up for this stress by releasing hormones to fight the sickness. These hormones may cause your blood sugar levels to rise. There is no cure for the common cold; we have to help with symptoms that we are suffering. One of the annoying symptoms is a cough. There are 2 main ingredients over the counter helpful for a cough, yet so many products on the shelf. You will find that they contain one if not both of these medications and may be mixed with pain medication or medicine for congestion. This can be confusing, especially if when worried about raising blood sugar levels. Keep in mind is that suffering from cold symptoms usually is short term barring any complications. It is temporary and soon you will be feeling better. There are two main types of cough- a wet, mucus cough and a dry, hacking cough. They are treated differently. When you want to get rid of the mucus in your lungs (wet cough) this is treated with an expectorant – guaifenesin. A dry cough is treated with a cough suppressant –dextromethorphan. Guaifenesin is an expectorant that helps break up and clear mucus in your lungs. It is available in tablet and liquid form. The tablets, available 600 mg or higher, are more potent, and work better than the smaller doses available in a syrup as 100 mg. For a dry cough, the most effective medication is dextromethorphan. This is available in a syrup, tablet or capsule form. This medication will work in your brain’s cough center to make you less likely to cough. Although the medication is available as a syrup you only need to take 2-4 teaspoons full per day. The likelihood of this sma Continue reading >>

Recommendation For Sugar Free Cough Meds/drops

Recommendation For Sugar Free Cough Meds/drops

Recommendation for sugar free cough meds/drops Recommendation for sugar free cough meds/drops Hi All! Can somebody recommend sugar-free cough meds/drops? I used to just take 2 tablespoons of honey for coughs but of course that's not an option for me now. I just called to schedule with my PCP but won't be able to see her until end of November. Thanks in advance. D.D. Family Pre-Diabetic since April 2017 Robitussin makes a cough medicine in a pill form. Sometimes you have to ask for it at the pharmacy counter -- not a prescription item though. A few other brands (Alka Seltzer Cold, Mucinex, etc.) also have pill form, sometimes with other meds mixed in, so you may have to choose one that only treats your symptoms. If you want a syrup, there are a few brands with sugar free options: Robitussin, again, Diatussin, etc. Can't say how they taste (I just go for the pill form). Ask the pharmacist for a recommendation, if you can't decide. Diagnosed pre-diabetic in April 2017; treating with lchf diet and exercise. 120 mg Nadolol, Magnesium, pacemaker/ICD implant since Apr 2014 You should be able to find sugar free cough drops at most drug stores. Breathing steam helps. A vaporizer with Vicks is good. Also, an aromatherapy diffuser with cool mist with eucalyptus oil is comforting. Continue reading >>

How To Choose Cough Syrup For Diabetics

How To Choose Cough Syrup For Diabetics

For people with diabetes , sickness as mild as cold can truly be troublesome. The ailment itself does not endanger their health or life, but the medicine used for treating it is often contraindicated with their condition. Symptoms like coughs can often be relieved only by taking syrup, which contains sugar, which is bad for their diabetes. Diabetic people thus need to know how to pick the rightcough syrup for diabetics. If you are diabetic who is dealing with coughs, you should know whether the sugar content of the syrup is dangerous for your health and whether you should pick a sugar-free drug to treat your condition. Is the Sugar in Cough Syrup Harmful for Your Health? Before you buy and use sugar-freecough syrup for diabetics, the first option that is often available for you when it comes to choosing the right medicine for your condition a syrup that contains sugar. The question is, is the sugar content of the syrup dangerous for your condition? When you read the label of the cough syrup, you will see that the drug is not recommended for people with diabetes. The most common message printed on the label is that you need to ask your doctor before taking the drug if you have heart problem, high blood pressure or diabetes. By looking at the label alone, you should already know that the drug should be taken with caution, especially if you are diabetic. So, the drug tells you that as a diabetic , you should consult your doctor before trying to take the drug. But doctor is not available all the time, right? So, most of the time, you need to rely on your own judgment to determine whether the sugar-containing drug is safe for you to use. If you want to avoid sugar completely, then you need to avoid using sugar-containing cough syrup and choose sugar-freecough syrup for diab Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

An ingredient found in cough medicine may assist in treating diabetes, according to a new study out of the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. According to the study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, dextromethorphan, often listed simply as “DM” on the labels of cold medications, boosted the release of insulin in mice, human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small group of diabetes patients. DM has far fewer side effects than most current type 2 diabetes drugs, which is what prompted the doctors to believe it may be a new potential treatment option. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by very high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which the cells require to live. But people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin (which comes from the pancreas and moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells where it’s needed). As a result, blood sugar remains high, unable to move to the cells. The authors of the study interestingly did not plan on studying dextromethorphan as a potential treatment for diabetes initially; instead, they fell into it by chance. Inspired by previous research, the authors were originally focusing on a disorder called hyperinsulism, which is essentially the opposite of diabetes in that it involves a person having too much insulin. They hypothesized that dextromethorphan would actually lower and suppress insulin release in patients with hyperinsulinism. But while studying it, they discovered that a certain compound that’s released as a byproduct of DM, dextrorphan, actually increased insulin release from a patient’s pancreas — thus making it potentially useful in treating type 2 diabetes. The researchers aren’t entirely sure how it works; however, they assume it has something to do with suppressing t Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Cough And Cold Products For Patients With Diabetes

Cough And Cold Products For Patients With Diabetes

Ms. Terrie is a clinical pharmacy writer based in Haymarket, Virginia. Currently, a variety of OTC cough and cold products are available on the market to meet the specific needs of the diabetes patient population. Pharmacists can assist patients with diabetes by making them aware of the availability of these specialized cough and cold products, as well as guide them in the proper selection of OTC products. These specialized products are available in various formulations that include liquids, tablets, and lozenges for both the adult and pediatric patient populations. Many of the cough and cold products marketed for the diabetic population are formulated as free of sugar, alcohol, dextrose, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium, fructose, glycerin, and dyes. Prior to recommending the use of any OTC products to patients with diabetes, pharmacists should evaluate the patient?s current allergy/medical history and drug profile to prevent potential drug interactions and/or contraindications, as well as ascertain if self-treatment is appropriate. Furthermore, pharmacists should always counsel patients on the proper use of these products and remind patients to always adhere to the manufacturer?s directions and warnings listed on the product?s label and to avoid the use of medications that contain sugar or alcohol when possible. During patient counseling, pharmacists should advise patients to consult a pharmacist or their primary health care provider before using any OTC products, including alternative/complementary medications or supplements, to determine if they are appropriate to use. Patients also should be reminded to always read the labels to check the sugar and alcohol content of medications. It is important for pharmacists to remind patients that the use of certain medications may af Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes The Healthy Way.

Living With Diabetes The Healthy Way.

Take steps to stay healthy with these 3 helpful tips, and choose the right remedy for you during cold and flu season. Prevention. Your blood glucose levels may rise when your immune system is down.1 In addition to monitoring your blood glucose levels, keep your hands washed, bring hand sanitizer wherever you go, and avoid touching your face. Food & Hydration. Maintain your regular meal plan as much as possible. If you don’t have an appetite, talk to your doctor about creating a sick-day meal plan. Drink plenty of fluids. Liquids help to flush out the infection and also help to lower your increased blood glucose levels. 2 BENYLIN® Cough & Chest Congestion for People with Diabetes. This sugar-free remedy is just as effective as BENYLIN® Extra Strength Cough and Chest Congestion Syrup; and it contains a decongestant suitable for diabetes*. Sugar-free is a great choice! 1 2 * To be sure this product is right for you always read and follow the label. Continue reading >>

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

Guidelines by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) indicate most over-the-counter cough and cold remedies may be ineffective, and doctors suggest that children under 12 do not take these remedies. Still over-the-counter cold medicines abound in the pharmacy. While most people can take any of the cold medication at the prescribed dose without side effects, diabetics have to be careful since cold medication does contain some sugar. However, to cater to a large market, pharmaceutical companies have come up with cold medicine formulas safe for diabetics. Benylin Adult Benylin Adult is a sugar-free and alcohol-free version of the cold medicine popular with patients who have associated cough symptoms as well. The most common ingredient for the formula is dextromethorphan. Robitussin-CF Robitussin-CF with dextromethorphan helps control cold and coughs. It is sugar-free and can safely be used by diabetic patients. Diabetic Products by Scot-Tussin Scot-Tussin products were the first in a line of sugar-free and alcohol-free cold and cough medicines. These are safe for diabetics. Echinacea Combinations A company called Insure makes a natural cold medicine from Echinacea combinations. This is a sugar-free product and helps colds and coughs. However, diabetics should always inform a doctor when they take a medication to ensure there are no interactions with any medication they may be on. Sugar-Free Cough and Cold Drops There are lots of sugar-free cough and cold drops that help soothe the throat when you have a cold. These are available at most stores. Flu Shot The best cold and flu treatment prescribed by doctors is the flu shot at the beginning of winter or end of fall. It helps reduce the intensity of any cold and flu you may get, and it is safe for diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Prescription Cough Medicine!

Sugar Free Prescription Cough Medicine!

Well I managed to get a bottle of sugar free prescription cough medicine! This was no easy task as my doctor did not know what to prescribe and the pharmacy didn't know they had sugar free cough syrup. It seems I was the first person to ever request this! Also you need a paper prescription because it has codeine in it - my doctor first ordered a cough medicine which did not come in sugar free, so I had to go back to the doctor and get a different paper prescription. The pharmacy only has one type which is sugar free and it is called: Guaifenesin/Codine 100-10 mg/5ml SF. I also found over-the-counter sugar free cough medicine, but could only find one type - "Tussin DM". And that only comes in a small container. (Do they think we need less if sugar free or something?) And I found sugar free orange drink which tastes just like orange juice. This is at Walmart in the Kool Aid/soda pop area. It is a powdered drink mix. You can get one packet to make just one glass. So with the cold I have now, my blood sugars are not going through the roof. Nice! I have used the Robutussin DM and it worked for me. I like 4-C products s.f. cranberry/pomegranite drink. Good for you for persisting and achieving prescription sf cough medicine! I, too, hope that you can feel better now and heal quickly. Unfortunately, I can not tolerate any artificial sweeteners. One dose of sf cough medicine and I will have diarrhea all night long. I was finally able to find some Robitussin DM pills that work well, do not raise my bg AND do not cause diarrhea! "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce ca Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Cough Syrup Does Not Raise Blood Sugars

Sugar-free Cough Syrup Does Not Raise Blood Sugars

Sugar-free Cough Syrup Does Not Raise Blood Sugars People with diabetes should know that they have the option of treating their seasonal cold and flu symptoms with a sugar-free cough syrup. Most consumers dont even realize how much sugar is in many cough and cold medicines, not to mention many other unnecessary ingredients, says Gary M. April, president of Health Care Products, the company that manufactures Diabetic Tussin. Diabetic Tussin is the first and only cough and cold medicine formulated without sugar, sodium, alcohol, fructose, sorbitol, dyes and decongestants. It contains the active ingredients Guaifensin and Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide to control coughs and relieve chest congestion. A childrens formula and cough drops in cherry and menthol flavors are also available. Diabetic Tussin comes in liquid and soft gel, and is available at most major supermarkets and wholesalers throughout the country, including Wal-Mart, Target, Walgreens, Rite-Aid, Kroger and Giant Foods. For more information on Diabetic Tussin, visit Health Care Products Web site at www.diabeticproducts.com, or call (800) 899-3116. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

The cold and flu season is on its way. And while sick days bring everyone down, people with type 2 diabetes have some special considerations when they're under the weather. In addition to choosing the right cold medications and checking in with your doctor about possible dosage changes, good diabetes care means being prepared for the days when you would rather not drag yourself out of bed for a glucose check or a snack. Pick the Right Cold Medicine “A lot of [cold and flu] medications, particularly cough syrup, are high in glucose,” says internist Danny Sam, MD, the program director of the residency program at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Calif. His practice specializes in adult diabetes. If you have diabetes, your best bet is a medicine that is clearly labeled sugar-free. Almost every major pharmacy has a store brand of sugar-free cold or cough medicine, says Dr. Sam. If you have questions, ask your pharmacist for help. Check Blood Sugar Often “Diabetes is not as well controlled when you are sick,” observes Sam. This is because when your body fights infection, it releases a chemical cascade that can alter your body’s glucose and insulin response. As a result, you may need to check your blood sugar more often than you usually do. People with type 2 diabetes may need to check their blood sugar four times a day, and should check their urine for ketones anytime their blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dL. Other medications you may need to take when you are sick can affect your blood sugar levels: Aspirin may lower blood sugar levels Certain antibiotics may decrease blood sugar levels in those taking some oral diabetes medications Decongestants may raise blood sugar levels Adjust Your Plan “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you m Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine Ingredient May Aid Diabetes Fight

Cough Medicine Ingredient May Aid Diabetes Fight

MORE An ingredient in many over-the-counter cough suppressants seems to improve the release of insulin in humans, a discovery that may lead to new treatments for Type 2 diabetes. Doctors at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany, found that the drug dextromethorphan increased the release of insulin from the pancreas in a series of studies conducted first in mice, then in human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small sample of people with diabetes. Dextromethorphan, often indicated by the letters DM on the labels of cold medications, has few serious side effects, particularly in comparison to the current arsenal of drugs used to treat people with Type 2 diabetes, the researchers noted. The results appear today (March 16) in the journal Nature Medicine. Type 2 diabetes affects about 350 million people globally, according to the World Health Organization. The disease is characterized by elevated levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which cells use for fuel. Insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas, ferries glucose out of the blood and into the cells. But in people with Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin, or cells no longer respond properly to the hormone. The authors of the new study said they stumbled upon the effects of dextromethorphan on diabetes by mistake. Based on the work that other researchers did a decade ago, they thought that dextromethorphan would suppress insulin secretion in patients with a condition called hyperinsulinism, which involves having too much insulin in the blood stream, somewhat opposite of diabetes. [7 Bizarre Drug Side Effects] Instead, they found that dextromethorphan — or, more specifically, a compound called dextrorphan, which is a byproduct that forms in the body when someone takes dex Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

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