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Cough Medicine For Diabetics With High Blood Pressure

Cold Medications For Diabetics

Cold Medications For Diabetics

I've acquired a miserable cold with head and chest congestion along with sneezing, coughing and a runny "doze"! Tis the season... or nearly the season... I suppose... This is my first real lulu of a cold since being diagnosed diabetic... and I hope it's the last... Dream on, Cheri... I thought I'd share with you what the pharmacist told me today: Do not take things like hot cold medications, non-sugar-free cough syrups. In larger pharmacies there are sugar-free expectorant cough syrups available and they will order the same in for me upon request. If you have high blood pressure and or diabetes: Do not take any pill, tablet or capsual form of decongestants. They all raise both blood pressure and blood gulcose levels. Diabetics can use nasal sprays quite safely, though, apparently... according to the pharmacist... I HATE nasal sprays or anything else that has to be taken into my body THAT way!!! LOL! Grrr.... So I said to Daryl, our pharmacist, "Other than nasal sprays, sugar-free cough syrups, and homemade chicken soup there isn't anything else that I can do for this wretched cold." He said, "NO!" I did try one experiment this afternoon, though. I made a hot lemon drink with real juice from real lemons and added a packet of "Equal" sugar substitute to it! This really helped to stop this wretched coughing quite a bit. I try it again before I go to bed tonight. We diabetics can take sugar-free cought syrups, but watch out for the sugar-alcohol levels in them, nasal sprays, chicken soup, low sodium of course, and hot lemon drinks made with real lemons and quality sugar subsitutes. I sure hope that this helps some of you... Continue reading >>

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

Are Cough And Cold Products Safe For People With Diabetes?

It's that time of year again. Stuffy noses, scratchy throats, upset tummies, and splitting headaches can send even the most stoic among us to the local drugstore for a magic pill to take away the pain. The fluorescent aisles of brightly colored bottles promising fast relief can seem daunting. Are all over-the-counter cold and flu meds safe for people with diabetes? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Most experts agree that most people with diabetes can feel free to select whatever over-the-counter (OTC) product works best for them, so long as the medication is taken as directed. At the same time, everyone is different so it's important to shop smartly to ensure a quick and safe recovery from this season's infections. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Ask the Pharmacist Don't just wander around the drugstore dazed and confused. "When making these choices, this is a time to utilize a pharmacist…This is what they are trained for…Tell the pharmacist all your symptoms, what other medicines you are taking,” says Jerry Meece, RPh, FACA, CDE, director of clinical services at the Plaza Pharmacy and Wellness Center in Gainesville, Texas." Meter/Monitor Accuracy There's been concern that certain OTC medications can cause false blood glucose readings. "Ten years ago, as companies were changing the process by which they mon Continue reading >>

Managing Cold And Flu Symptom Relief In Patients With Hypertension

Managing Cold And Flu Symptom Relief In Patients With Hypertension

Managing Cold and Flu Symptom Relief in Patients With Hypertension Hypertension, commonly known as high blood pressure (BP), affects approximately 34% of adults 20 years or older in the United States.1,2 It has been estimated that less than half (46%) of patients with hypertension achieve BP control.2 With adults generally suffering 2 to 4 colds each year,3 pharmacists are frequently asked to recommend treatment for the relief of common cold, often in patients who may also have elevated BP. In patients with hypertension, the use of certain medications that may raise BP should be avoided.4 It is important for pharmacists to raise awareness of considerations for their patients with high BP, and to counsel them on appropriate treatment options that provide cold and flu symptom relief without adversely affecting their BP. Cold and Flu: Multiple, Concurrent, Bothersome Symptoms To understand how symptoms present over the course of a typical cold or flu, Vicks, the makers of NyQuilTMand DayQuilTM, conducted a prospective cold surveillance study among employee volunteers. Data were gathered on community-acquired cold illness episodes over a 4-year period. The study is unique because most subjects were enrolled within 24 hours of the start of cold symptoms.5 Self-reported cold symptoms over the first 7 days, assessed at 9 AM, 3 PM, and 9 PM are shown in Figure 1.5,6 In a further analysis, cold symptoms of nasal congestion and cough were assessed independently; other symptoms were grouped according to their proximate pathophysiology, including secretory symptoms (runny nose, sneezing, watery eyes), and pain and feverish symptoms (sore/scratchy throat, headache, muscle aches and pains, feverishness and chilliness). Over the first 4 days of illness, the combination of secretory s Continue reading >>

Cough Suppressants For People With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Cough Suppressants For People With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

cough suppressants for people with diabetes and high blood pressure Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. cough suppressants for people with diabetes and high blood pressure I have been coughing now for 5 days, don't know why, what is the best cough suppressants for people with diabetes and high blood pressure. I have caught something that has been making me cough, as well. I finally used Ricola cough drops and it seems to have helped supress the cough. They are all natural so shouldn't hurt you. I hope you feel better soon. I have caught something that has been making me cough, as well. I finally used Ricola cough drops and it seems to have helped supress the cough. They are all natural so shouldn't hurt you. I hope you feel better soon. Maximum Strength Cough Suppressant abd Cold Relief. It is designed for diabetics so it is sugar free. We buy it a CVS, but I am sure other places care it. Manufactured by Scot - Tussin Pharmaceutical Let me know if you need any more information. There is a prescription drug called "Tessalon Perles" that works very well for coughs. I have a hard time with BP when I take a cough syrup. Doc gave me these and they were great. I didn't notice any side effects with them at all. If the source of your cough is a cold or allergy with nasal drainage, sometimes treating the nasal symptoms will help relieve the cough. Of course, many of those meds will also cause blood pressure to rise. I like to use the sugar free (isomalt) Cold-Eeze lozenges and as far as I know there is nothing in them that will cause an increase in blood pressure. However, please check the label and ask a pharmacist. Cold_Eeze seems to Continue reading >>

Cough Associated With Blood Pressure Medicine More Common In Diabetics

Cough Associated With Blood Pressure Medicine More Common In Diabetics

Cough Associated With Blood Pressure Medicine More Common in Diabetics Sept. 24, 1999 (Cleveland) -- A type of blood pressure medication that has been shown to help prevent the kidney damage associated with type 2 diabetes may cause an annoying, hacking, dry cough in as many as 15% of diabetics who take it, according to a survey done by a team of Italian researchers. The survey findings are reported in the September issue of Diabetes Care. The medication, called an ACE inhibitor, includes such drugs as Vasotec ( enalapril ), Capoten ( captopril ), and Prinivil ( lisinopril ). ACE inhibitors have been shown to be the most effective medication for controlling blood pressure in diabetics. High blood pressure and type 2 diabetes often occur hand-in-hand, and the combination can damage the kidneys , eventually causing kidney failure . In the survey, Pier Luigi Malini, MD, associate professor of medical therapeutics at the University of Bologna, tells WebMD that of the diabetic patients who reported the cough , only about 5% asked to be taken off the drug because of it. None of the patients involved in the study were aware that Malini's team was investigating cough . Malini tells WebMD that one very intriguing finding was that the 5% who did stop taking the medication because of the cough were among the few patients who knew it was a side effect. "This point is extremely interesting. Certainly awareness of the possibility of a side effect increases the chances that a patient might declare it," Malini says. "There are some patients who read the leaflet that accompanies the medication box, and the next time you see them they declare all the symptoms written." But the fact that some patients did not know about the cough is troubling, says Malini, because it suggests that the ph Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Safe Treatments For Cough

Safe Treatments For Cough

Cough is among the most common maladies for which pharmacists are consulted for treatment. Many people tend to trivialize cough as just another annoying symptom of an upper respiratory infection, but a nagging cough can slow recovery, and a severe cough can even be dangerous for some people. When choosing cough medicine, most people rely on what they?ve seen advertised or what may have seemed to work previously, but treating a cough properly is complex and requires careful application of both clinical and pharmacologic insight that may be unique to the pharmacist. Cough is usually accompanied by underlying problems that can range from benign and self-resolving to chronic or even life-threatening, depending on patient variables and comorbid illness. Effective treatment involves addressing or resolving the underlying cause while recognizing the significance of the cough itself on one?s overall health. Far from a trivial annoyance, cough has developed over time as a protective mechanism to expel material that doesn?t belong in the respiratory tract. Cough can become a serious health problem, however, causing severe complications, especially in someone who is already ill or debilitated. Severe or uncontrolled cough can: Impair the function of catheters and surgical shunts Cause soreness of the muscles used in coughing from overuse, making recovery from illness extremely painful Cause urinary or bowel incontinence, which can cause emotional trauma Damage bodily structures: fractured ribs; ruptured muscles of the abdomen; ruptured subconjunctival, nasal, and anal veins; ruptured spleen; inguinal or pulmonary herniation; inversion of the bladder through the urethra; pulmonary interstitial emphysema; and neck problems Cause neurologic problems such as dizziness, headache, hypo Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Cough Medicines For People With High Blood Pressure

Cough Medicines For People With High Blood Pressure

Cough Medicines for People With High Blood Pressure Diana Kaniecki has been writing health-related articles since 1991. Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed health journals including the "American Journal of Cardiology," "Chest" and "Pharmacoeconomics." She also develops health technology products for wellness and chronic illness self-management. Kaniecki received her Doctor of Clinical Pharmacy from St. Johns University. Several cough medicines may be safe for people with high blood pressure. Many seemingly safe over-the-counter cough and cold products may be dangerous for people with high blood pressure, because they can raise blood pressure without causing symptoms. Therefore, it is very important to be selective when it comes to selecting cough and cold products. Those with high blood pressure should familiarize themselves with the ingredients in over-the-counter medicines before buying any of them. The American Heart Association says various cough products contain decongestants that can both raise blood pressure and affect the way blood pressure medicines work. This is because decongestants tighten blood vessels in the nose and other parts of the body, says the Mayo Clinic. The clinic recommends over-the-counter cough products that do not contain a decongestant for those who have high blood pressure. Examples of common decongestant ingredients in multisymptom cough and cold products that can increase blood pressure include pseudoephedrine, ephedrine and phenylephrine, according to the Mayo Clinic. Those with high blood pressure may consider cough and cold products that do not contain any of these ingredients. The Heart Association advises that it is still important to discuss taking any over-the-counter medication with a doctor. Cough and cold products that are Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure--medicines To Help You

High Blood Pressure--medicines To Help You

High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is often called a "silent killer" because many people have it but do not know it. Some people do not feel sick at first. Over time, people who do not get treated for high blood pressure can get very sick or even die. High blood pressure can cause: kidney failure stroke blindness and heart attacks. There is good news. There are life-saving medicines people can take every day to help control their high blood pressure. People who eat healthy foods, exercise, and take their medicines every day can control their blood pressure. Take your blood pressure medicines. It is important to take your blood pressure medicines every day. Take your medicines even when your blood pressure comes down … even when you do not feel bad. Do not stop taking your medicine until your doctor says that it is OK. Most people who take high blood pressure medicines do not get any side effects. Like all medicines, high blood pressure medicines can sometimes cause side effects. Some people have common problems like headaches, dizziness or an upset stomach. These problems are small compared to what could happen if you do not take your medicine. Understanding your blood pressure -- What do the numbers mean? When you have your blood pressure taken, you are told 2 numbers, like 120/80. Both numbers are important. The first number is your pressure when your hear t beats (systolic pressure). The second number is your pressure when your heart relaxes (diastolic pressure). High Blood Pressure Medicines Use this guide to help you talk to your doctor about your blood pressure medicines. Ask your doctor about the risks of taking your medicine. This guide only talks about some of the risks.Tell your doctor about any problems you are having. Also, tell Continue reading >>

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

Guidelines by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) indicate most over-the-counter cough and cold remedies may be ineffective, and doctors suggest that children under 12 do not take these remedies. Still over-the-counter cold medicines abound in the pharmacy. While most people can take any of the cold medication at the prescribed dose without side effects, diabetics have to be careful since cold medication does contain some sugar. However, to cater to a large market, pharmaceutical companies have come up with cold medicine formulas safe for diabetics. Benylin Adult Benylin Adult is a sugar-free and alcohol-free version of the cold medicine popular with patients who have associated cough symptoms as well. The most common ingredient for the formula is dextromethorphan. Robitussin-CF Robitussin-CF with dextromethorphan helps control cold and coughs. It is sugar-free and can safely be used by diabetic patients. Diabetic Products by Scot-Tussin Scot-Tussin products were the first in a line of sugar-free and alcohol-free cold and cough medicines. These are safe for diabetics. Echinacea Combinations A company called Insure makes a natural cold medicine from Echinacea combinations. This is a sugar-free product and helps colds and coughs. However, diabetics should always inform a doctor when they take a medication to ensure there are no interactions with any medication they may be on. Sugar-Free Cough and Cold Drops There are lots of sugar-free cough and cold drops that help soothe the throat when you have a cold. These are available at most stores. Flu Shot The best cold and flu treatment prescribed by doctors is the flu shot at the beginning of winter or end of fall. It helps reduce the intensity of any cold and flu you may get, and it is safe for diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Learning About Ace Inhibitors And Arbs For Diabetes

Learning About Ace Inhibitors And Arbs For Diabetes

Learning About ACE Inhibitors and ARBs for Diabetes ACE inhibitors and ARBs are medicines used to control blood pressure. They allow blood vessels to relax and open up. This lowers your blood pressure. When you have diabetes, taking an ACE inhibitor or ARB can help to: Treat high blood pressure. Your risk of problems from diabetes goes up when you have high blood pressure. Prevent or slow kidney damage. Diabetes can damage the blood vessels in the kidneys. High blood pressure can damage the kidneys, too. Lower the risks of stroke and heart attack. Your risks go up when you have high blood pressure, heart disease, or both. An ACE inhibitor or ARB is a good choice for people with diabetes. Unlike some medicines, these don't affect blood sugar levels. Some side effects of ACE inhibitors include: Low blood pressure. You may feel dizzy and weak. An allergic reaction of the skin. Symptoms may range from mild swelling to painful welts. You may have other side effects or reactions not listed here. Check the information that comes with your medicine. Be safe with medicines. Take your medicines exactly as prescribed. Call your doctor or nurse call line if you think you are having a problem with your medicine. Before starting an ACE inhibitor or ARB, tell your doctor if you: These medicines are not safe for pregnancy. If you are pregnant or planning to be, talk to your doctor about a safe blood pressure medicine. ACE inhibitors can cause a dry cough. If the cough is bad, talk to your doctor. Switching to an ARB is likely to help. Taking some medicines together can cause problems. Tell your doctor or pharmacist all the medicines you take. This includes over-the-counter medicines and natural health products. You may need regular blood and urine tests. Go to Enter M316 in the search Continue reading >>

Are Over-the-counter Cold Remedies Safe For People Who Have High Blood Pressure?

Are Over-the-counter Cold Remedies Safe For People Who Have High Blood Pressure?

Over-the-counter cold remedies aren't off-limits if you have high blood pressure, but it's important to make careful choices. Among over-the-counter cold remedies, decongestants cause the most concern for people who have high blood pressure. Decongestants relieve nasal stuffiness by narrowing blood vessels and reducing swelling in the nose. This narrowing can affect other blood vessels as well, which can increase blood pressure. To keep your blood pressure in check, avoid over-the-counter decongestants and multisymptom cold remedies that contain decongestants — such as pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline. Instead: Choose a cold medication designed for people who have high blood pressure. Some cold medications, such as Coricidin HBP, don't contain decongestants. However, these medications may contain other powerful drugs, such as dextromethorphan, that can be dangerous if you take too much. Follow the dosing instructions carefully. Take a pain reliever. To relieve a fever, sore throat or headache or body aches, try aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use saline nasal spray. To relieve nasal congestion, try saline nasal spray. The spray can help flush your sinuses. Soothe your throat. To relieve a sore or scratchy throat, gargle with warm salt water or drink warm water with lemon juice and honey. Drink plenty of fluids. Water, juice, tea and soup can help clear your lungs of phlegm and mucus. Increase the humidity in your home. Use a cool-mist humidifier or vaporizer to moisten the air, which may ease congestion and coughing. Get plenty of rest. If you're not feeling well, take it easy. Call your doctor if your signs and symptoms get worse instead of better or last more than 10 days. Continue reading >>

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