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Cough Medicine For Diabetics With High Blood Pressure

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How To Treat Cold Sores | How To Stop Getting Cold Sores | How To Prevent A Cold Sore When You Feel It Coming | Cold Sore Treatments Hey guys! This weeks video is about cold sores, how to prevent them and how to try and treat them. I couldn't find any information to clinically prove the effectiveness of some cold sore remedies seen online like distilled vinegar, witch hazel and alcohol, so I can't recommend them. But feel free to leave a comment if you've tried them to let us know how effective they were. WHAT ARE COLD SORES: About 1 in 5 people in the UK have recurring cold sores. Cold sores usually resolve on their own without treatment in 7-10 days. Cold sores, also known as fever blisters or oral herpes, are very common. They can be easy to recognise as they usually appear as red bumps or blisters around the lips and mouth. Cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), the oral form of the virus. In fact, 67% of the world population under age 50 has HSV-1 because it is so contagious Once you are infected, the virus never leaves your body. Most people arent exactly sure when they first encountered the virus. Its usually contracted in early childhood where it may not appear as a visible cold sore. HOW DO COLD SORES SPREAD: The oral herpes virus is spread through direct skin-to-skin contact. It is even contagious when you cant see a cold sore. Most people first contract the cold sore virus (HSV-1) when they are very young, usually by skin-to-skin contact with an adult carrying the virus. The virus can spread in various ways: through kissing, or by sharing objects like toothbrushes, water bottles, drinking glasses, and silverware. It is also possible to spread the virus from the mouth to the genitals, eyes, and other parts of the body. COLD SORE TRIGGERS WHICH MAY BE PREVENTED: Not everyones cold sores are triggered by the same thing, but these triggers are the ones which could be avoided to prevent a cold sore attack. Stress can wear down your immune system, giving that dormant cold sore a chance to launch a sneak attack. Instead, when you feel stressed, breathe deeply and relax. Heres a look at some relaxation techniques that can help you take it easy -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-... Being tired can make you vulnerable to cold sores. Like stress and illness, fatigue can zap your immune system, making you easy prey for a cold sore outbreak. Getting rest is key. Link to my video to help you get a better night sleep - https://youtu.be/m_ZHgD5rVPU If you find that sunlight triggers your cold sores, try using sunscreen lip balm (SPF 15 or more) before going out into bright sunlight. This has been found to prevent some bouts of cold sores in some people. Do not share lip balms with other people if you have cold sores. Prevent chapped lips in the cold by using a hydrating lip balm. COLD SORE TREATMENT: Aciclovir can be bought over-the-counter (OTC) at pharmacies. This does not kill the virus but prevents the virus from multiplying. It has little effect on existing blisters but may prevent them from becoming worse. The cream may provide some protection against cold sores caused by sunlight if it is used before exposure. If you use an antiviral cream as soon as symptoms start then the cold sore may not last as long as usual and may be less severe. There is debate as to how well the cream works. WHEN TO SEE YOUR GP: You should see your GP if you are unsure of the diagnosis, or if the cold sores are not resolving after a week or so. If you have a poor immune system (you are an immunocompromised person) and develop possible cold sores, you should see your GP. You may need tests to confirm the virus, and/or oral antiviral medicines. For full list please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cold-so... Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharma... https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamTh... https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449... https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Are Over-the-counter Cold Remedies Safe For People Who Have High Blood Pressure?

Over-the-counter cold remedies aren't off-limits if you have high blood pressure, but it's important to make careful choices. Among over-the-counter cold remedies, decongestants cause the most concern for people who have high blood pressure. Decongestants relieve nasal stuffiness by narrowing blood vessels and reducing swelling in the nose. This narrowing can affect other blood vessels as well, which can increase blood pressure. To keep your blood pressure in check, avoid over-the-counter decongestants and multisymptom cold remedies that contain decongestants — such as pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, phenylephrine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline. Instead: Choose a cold medication designed for people who have high blood pressure. Some cold medications, such as Coricidin HBP, don't contain decongestants. However, these medications may contain other powerful drugs, such as dextromethorphan, that can be dangerous if you take too much. Follow the dosing instructions carefully. Take a pain reliever. To relieve a fever, sore throat or headache or body aches, try aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use saline nasal spray. To relieve nasal congestion, try saline nasal spray. The spray Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. PaulinaB

    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.

  2. kimbo1962

    PaulinaB said: ↑
    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.
    Click to expand... When I was first diagnosed and picking up my first script for metformin the lovely pharmacist told me from then on to always say I was diabetic when purchasing over the counter medicines, I think it's due to some containing sugar- she did say there sugar free versions of most cough meds for example

  3. poohtiggy

    PaulinaB said: ↑
    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.
    Click to expand... I agree with Kimbo on this, it's probably sugar content. I have just had a hacking cough and because of other medication I have to avoid decongestants so I bought a simple Buttercup syrup and it contained something like 62g of sugar per 5ml spoonful, the box also had a warning for diabetics. Thanks Kimbo I did not know there were sugar free cough medicines I will look into that

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homemade cough drops(ginger lemon honey cough drops)is one of the best medicine for cold and cough.Hi guys,today i have come up with homemade cough syrup drops.this is one of the common cold treatment,this is the best cold medicine,you can easily make this with ginger,lemon,and honey,this is organic and a very effective cold treatment,it will improve diegestion power,and it's great for stomach upset,it is suitable for all ages.this cough syrup is easy and natural medicine,try it. mail me: [email protected]

Safe Treatments For Cough

Cough is among the most common maladies for which pharmacists are consulted for treatment. Many people tend to trivialize cough as just another annoying symptom of an upper respiratory infection, but a nagging cough can slow recovery, and a severe cough can even be dangerous for some people. When choosing cough medicine, most people rely on what they?ve seen advertised or what may have seemed to work previously, but treating a cough properly is complex and requires careful application of both clinical and pharmacologic insight that may be unique to the pharmacist. Cough is usually accompanied by underlying problems that can range from benign and self-resolving to chronic or even life-threatening, depending on patient variables and comorbid illness. Effective treatment involves addressing or resolving the underlying cause while recognizing the significance of the cough itself on one?s overall health. Far from a trivial annoyance, cough has developed over time as a protective mechanism to expel material that doesn?t belong in the respiratory tract. Cough can become a serious health problem, however, causing severe complications, especially in someone who is already ill or debilitate Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Kaiyle

    Nagging Dry Cough

    Does anyone else have nagging dry coughs? I've never had problems like this before the diabetes. I drink plenty of water and when the coughs come on, I grab a vitamin C drop which helps quiet it down. These dry coughs hit me sporadically and at the most inconvenient times. I would go a spell before it happens but now it's happening more often. Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can remedy this problem for good?!!!

  2. msann

    yes having that problem now runny nose and nagging cough but he going to have to change my bp pills my pills are one of the side effects

  3. Anonymous

    I have been a diabetic for over 10 yrs I have this dry cough and its annoying can u help please

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How To Treat A Cold | How To Cure Common Cold | Best Medicine For A Cold, Fever & Sore Throat OTC Pharmacy Medicine A cold is a mild viral infection of the nose, throat, sinuses and upper airways. It's very common and usually clears up on its own within a week or two. Adults have an average of two to three colds a year. Children have an average of five to six colds a year. Young children in nursery schools may average up to twelve colds per year. The main symptoms of a cold include: Sore throat Blocked or runny nose Sneezing Cough More severe symptoms, including a high temperature (fever), headache and aching muscles can also occur, although these tend to be associated more with flu. WHAT TO DO: There's no cure for a cold, but you can look after yourself at home by, Resting, drinking plenty of fluids and eating healthily. Taking over-the-counter painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to help with headaches, temperatures and even sore throats. Using decongestant sprays to relieve a blocked nose. Trying remedies such as gargling salt water to help with a sore throat (not suitable for children). Many painkillers, decongestants and other medicines are available from pharmacies without a prescription. When buying any medicine please always run it by your pharmacist so you they can make sure these medicines are ok for you to take. WHEN TO SEE YOUR GP: You only really need to contact your GP if: Your symptoms persist for more than three weeks. Your symptoms get suddenly worse. You have breathing difficulties. You develop complications of a cold, such as chest pain or coughing up bloodstained mucus. It might also be a good idea to speak to your Pharmacist or GP if you're concerned about your baby or an elderly person, or if you have a long-term illness such as a lung condition. You can also phone NHS 111 for advice. HOW TO STOP THE SPREAD OF A COLD: You can take some simple steps to help prevent the spread of a cold. For example: Use your own cup, plates, cutlery and kitchen utensils. Don't share towels or toys with someone who has a cold Wash your hands regularly, particularly before touching your nose or mouth and before handling food. Always sneeze and cough into tissues this will help prevent the virus-containing droplets from your nose and mouth entering the air, where they can infect others; you should throw away used tissues immediately and wash your hands. Clean surfaces regularly to keep them free of germs. For more information on stopping the spread visit: https://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cold-co... Here are some related keywords for this video: How to treat a cold How to cure common cold Best medicine for a cold Best medicine for a cold and fever Best medicine for a cold and sore throat Best OTC medicine for a cold Best medicine for a cold and congestion What to do with a cold How to treat common cold How to cure a cold Best medicine to treat a cold Best medicine to cure a cold Best medicine to treat common cold Best medicine to cure common cold Pharmacy medicine for a cold OTC medicine cold Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharma... https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamTh... https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449... https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamTheP... ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a bett Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. PaulinaB

    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.

  2. kimbo1962

    PaulinaB said: ↑
    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.
    Click to expand... When I was first diagnosed and picking up my first script for metformin the lovely pharmacist told me from then on to always say I was diabetic when purchasing over the counter medicines, I think it's due to some containing sugar- she did say there sugar free versions of most cough meds for example

  3. poohtiggy

    PaulinaB said: ↑
    Hi all,
    I bought some cold medication that contains: paracetamol, phenylephrine and guaifenesin. On the leaflet is says "do not take if you have diabetes" (along other medical conditions). I'm wondering - WHY? Is there any specific reason or is this just general "advice"? It's not even in the "take special care" section, but in the big bold "do not take".
    I know that there are other therapies/treatments for cold, I was just curious if there's anything special about those ingredients that can be "bad" for diabetics. I always assumed that if something can affect you BG, it would be in the "take care" section, and the "do not take" section was for serious, potentially life-threatening interactions.
    Click to expand... I agree with Kimbo on this, it's probably sugar content. I have just had a hacking cough and because of other medication I have to avoid decongestants so I bought a simple Buttercup syrup and it contained something like 62g of sugar per 5ml spoonful, the box also had a warning for diabetics. Thanks Kimbo I did not know there were sugar free cough medicines I will look into that

  4. -> Continue reading
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