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Cottage Cheese Diabetes

Confused About Cottage Cheese And Peaches

Confused About Cottage Cheese And Peaches

Confused about Cottage Cheese and Peaches Confused about Cottage Cheese and Peaches I've just recently been diagnosed with diabetes. I need to lose weight and my cholesterol is 5.6. The doctor says it should be at the most 5 so I'm trying to lower it. The nurse recently asked me to keep a food diary and write down everything I ate. On the follow up appointment she went through my diet and everything was ok except for some low fat cottage cheese and a peach I had eaten (I didn't eat them together ). I love cottage cheese and over 8 days, I had eaten cottage cheese 4 times (mostly for lunch with a salad). She said the cottage cheese was not as good as people imagine and that while it was ok I should limit the number of times I eat it. Looking at the tub there is this information on it: I'm not sure why cottage cheese should be restricted as I'm so new to this but could someone tell me why cottage cheese should not be eaten much? Also, instead of the peach, the nurse recommended I eat an apple, hard pear, hard banana or orange. I've looked at the information at this site and the calories and carbohydrates of peaches seem better than those of appleas, pears, bananas and oranges. Once again I am confused. Could someone please explain why peaches should be avoided? Friend Diagnosed with type two on July 5th, 2006 Maybe there is way too much fats./triglycerides (I have to read up on those).my mother was telling me to watch it on cheese...because there is a lot of fat in it..and we don't want that stuff to add up in our bodies,and or to our heart or ateries...but, I can ask or research around, and you should do that too...because there might just be some cheeses that would be a lot healthier for us....I think that alpine cheese is a lot lighter..you can buy this at safeway or Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Cottage Cheese?

Can A Diabetic Eat Cottage Cheese?

Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light. Bowl of cottage cheesePhoto Credit: YelenaYemchuk/iStock/Getty Images If you have diabetes, planning your meals around nutrient-dense foods that promote healthy glucose levels is a top priority. Your physician will likely recommend you see a dietitian to help create a meal plan that is right for you. Watching your carbohydrate intake at each meal is crucial. Luckily, cottage cheese is low in carbs and protein-rich, so you can enjoy it as part of a healthy diet. The American Diabetes Association lists cottage cheese as one of the best cheese choices you can make. Portion control plays a dominant role in meal planning for people with diabetes. Two ounces of low-fat or nonfat cottage cheese provides 7 grams of protein, about 2 grams or less of carbohydrates and about 1 gram or less of fat. This amount is listed as a serving on the diabetic exchange list. Lose Weight. Feel Great!Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM Continue reading >>

Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting On A Diet For My Diabetes

Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting On A Diet For My Diabetes

Cases of people being newly diagnosed with diabetes is on the rise. Because of this many people are often misinformed about what it means to have diabetes (type 1 and type 2) and how you should be eating. Before you begin any crazy diabetic diet, its important to take a step back and learn as much as you can about your eating habits. Dont think just because you have diabetes you have to stop eating your favorite foods, this is as far from the truth as it can get. When I talked to those newly diagnosed about what they wish they knew before they started their new food journey with diabetes, they had some really good tips. I wanted to compile these amazing tips together in one convenient location so that you all could benefit from them. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. When you eat food, it is broken down into glucose, or sugar. Glucose is responsible for providing your body with the energy it needs. In order to use the glucose as energy, your body requires insulin. When you have Type 1 diabetes , your body does not make its own insulin and requires injections for assistance with this. With type 2 diabetes , your body does not have the ability to make enough insulin or use it properly. Because the cells in your body cannot use the glucose as energy, this glucose stays in your bloodstream which leads to high blood sugar levels and potential problems. While there is no cure for diabetes, it can be managed. Learning to balance out the foods you eat with the proper treatment plan and exercise can help to keep your blood sugars within a healthy range. The Most Impo Continue reading >>

Cottage Cheese-lemon Pancakes

Cottage Cheese-lemon Pancakes

Spray griddle or skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat to medium heat. Combine baking mix and sugar in large mixing bowl. Make well in center of mixture. Add water, egg, oil, cottage cheese, and lemon peel. Stir mixture with wire whisk just until blended. Using 1/4-cup measure or ladle, pour batter onto griddle. Cook pancakes on griddle until golden brown, turning once. Serving suggestion:Serve with plain nonfat yogurt, additional lemon peel, raspberries and mint leaves. Yield: 12 (4-inch) pancakes. Serving size: 3 pancakes per serving. Calories: 245 calories, Carbohydrates: 37 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 55 mg, Sodium: 547 mg, Fiber: 3 g Exchanges per serving: 2 Bread/Starch, 1 Fat, 1 Meat. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Prevention And Treatment Of Diabetes With Fruit

Prevention And Treatment Of Diabetes With Fruit

Unlike type 1 diabetes, the risk of type 2 diabetes reduces when aligned with a healthy weight. Whether you're looking to prevent or treat diabetes, how can nutritious foods and fruits fit into a diabetic diet? Diabetes is a growing health condition affecting more than nine percent of the U.S. population, with type 2 diabetes comprising 90 to 95 percent of those numbers and type 1 covering the rest. Unlike type 1 diabetes, the risk of type 2 diabetes reduces when aligned with a healthy weight. But with obesity on the rise, it is understandable how type 2 diabetes is, and projected to be, so common and prevalent. Whether looking to prevent or treat diabetes, how can nutritious foods and fruits fit into a diabetes game plan? Fruits and Diabetes Does an apple a day keep diabetes away? Published Harvard research from 2013 suggests two servings of fruit each week can do so - specifically blueberries, grapes, and apples. The catch? Fruits should be consumed in their whole form, as fruit juices can actually increase the risk of diabetes. But ultimately, the total game plan reduces the risk of diabetes. A well-balanced diet is critical to all levels of health - generally filled whole grains, nutritious fruits and veggies, lean proteins, and healthy fats. Additionally, consistent aerobic exercise and strength training each week further aids in weight loss and whole-body health. Can Diabetics Eat Fruits? If diagnosed with diabetes, fruit lovers can rejoice! Yes, diabetics can eat fruits! Individuals generally have a misrepresentation in their head regarding a diabetic-friendly diet, particularly when it comes to fruit and diabetes. Although fruit is a rich carbohydrate source, its intake offers more than natural sugar - they are mostly loaded with fiber and an abundance of nutrie Continue reading >>

Diet Guidelines: No-no Foods — Eliminating Simple Sugars

Diet Guidelines: No-no Foods — Eliminating Simple Sugars

NO-NO FOODS: ELIMINATING SIMPLE SUGARS Named below are some of the common foods that contain simple sugars, which rapidly raise blood sugar or otherwise hinder blood sugar control and should be eliminated from your diet. All grain products, for example—from the flour in “sugar-free” cookies to pasta to wheat or non-wheat grain products except pure bran—are converted so rapidly into glucose by the enzymes in saliva and further down in the digestive tract that they are, as far as blood sugar is concerned, essentially no different than table sugar. There are plenty of food products, however, that contain such tiny amounts of simple sugars that they will have a negligible effect on your blood sugar. One gram of carbohydrate will not raise blood sugar more than 5 mg/dl for most diabetic adults (but considerably more for small children). A single stick of chewing gum or a single tablespoon of salad dressing made with only 1 gram of sugar certainly poses no problems. In these areas, you have to use your judgment and your blood sugar profiles. If you’re the type who, once you start chewing gum, has to have a new stick every 5 minutes, then you should probably avoid chewing gum. If you have delayed stomach-emptying (Chapter 22), small amounts of “sugar-free” chewing gum may help facilitate your digestion. Powdered Artificial Sweeteners At this writing, several artificial sweeteners are available. They are available from different manufacturers under different names, and some, such as Equal and Sweet’n Low, can have brand names under which more than one form of sweetener is sold. Here, to simplify your shopping, are acceptable products currently and soon to be available: saccharin tablets or liquid (Sweet’n Low) aspartame tablets (Equal, NutraSweet)* acesulfame- Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: Healthy Diabetes Diet Foods | Prevention

Diabetes Prevention: Healthy Diabetes Diet Foods | Prevention

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet , and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber(plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calciumabout 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fatthe kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin Da potent diabetes-quelling combinationthan in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both nutrients. You can get these nu Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Cottage Cheese Parfait With Berries

Sugar-free Cottage Cheese Parfait With Berries

Sugar-free Cottage Cheese Parfait with Berries Berries and cottage cheese come together perfectly in this easy and healthy, no sugar added Cottage Cheese Parfait. Cottage cheese is a wonderful ingredient to use for creamy desserts. Its extremely versatile. Just throw it in the blender with other flavorful ingredients, puree until smooth, and there ya have ita great base for delicious dessert like this Cottage Cheese Parfait. This recipe is super simple. Just toss some low fat cottage cheese into a blender or food processor, add a little cinnamon, some vanilla extract, and liquid stevia to taste (I used 8 drops total). Blend until smooth and chill until you are ready to use it. When you are ready to enjoy this easy treat, divide the creamy cottage cheese mixture into two small bowls and top with your favorite berryor other fruit for that matter! For my Cottage Cheese Parfait, I chose to use blackberries. I find the sweet and tart nature of the nutrient rich blackberries perfectly complements the creamy slightly sweet cottage cheese layer. Blackberries are also a great nutrient rich option, packed with Vitamin C. Another great thing about this dessert is that it lasts. The cottage cheese base stores well in the refrigerator for a few days. You can easily whip together a few batches and have a healthy dessert ready for you anytime you want! Just keep the berries on the side until you are ready to eat it. Although this sugar-free dessert is delightful as is, it would be quite delicious if you wanted to add a little something extra to itlike almonds! If you do add almonds to your parfait, make sure they are toasted and not salted. Either way, Im sure you will enjoy this easy Sugar-free Cottage Cheese Parfait with berries. Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetics – Best And Worst Foods

Type Ii Diabetics – Best And Worst Foods

Having diabetes can make dining out a nightmare, but knowing what the best and worst foods for type II diabetics can help you manage and even cure it! There is a sort of balancing act that has to happen to keep the body’s blood sugar levels in the right range without getting too hungry. That’s why it’s just as important to know what NOT to eat as it is to know what to eat. Why is this so important? Because having blood sugar too low or too high can cause big swings in a diabetic’s symptoms, including: Dizziness Headaches Cravings Frequent Urination Unusually High Thirst Fatigue Tingling in the Hands And many other side effects happen when a type II diabetic’s blood sugar is out of whack. So the goal is to be eating the kinds of food that make you feel full and happy, WITHOUT the crazy blood sugar spikes. P.S. If you’re into healthy eating tools, check out our awesome Healthy Salad Dressing Recipes Magnet and Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Conversion Magnets at the end of this article! The Basics Chances are that you don’t have a nutrition degree and probably started with a very vague understanding of what type II diabetes is. In order to follow a healthy diet, understanding how certain foods affect blood sugar is key. The good news: Keep in mind that type II diabetes is curable in most cases. With the right plan of action and program, many people see their type II diabetes reversed. The following foods are a big part of curing and managing diabetes. The Best and Worst Foods for Type II Diabetics Proteins Proteins are the building blocks of lean muscle tissue and a healthy, happy body. It will also have virtually no effect on blood sugar levels. So you should be eating a large amount of protein in a diabetic diet. Best sources: Lean protein sources like organic Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes-friendly Breakfast Ideas

8 Diabetes-friendly Breakfast Ideas

Starting out the day with a wholesome breakfast can benefit just about anyone. This healthy habit is especially important for people with diabetes. There’s even evidence to suggest that eating a healthy breakfast can support weight loss, which can positively improve blood sugar control and insulin sensitivity. “Some studies find that breakfast eaters are slimmer, have overall diets with greater nutritional quality, and have less insulin resistance,” Jill Weisenberger, MS, RDN, CDE, FAND, told Healthline. Weisenberger is a Virginia-based registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Skipping breakfast may be associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published in Public Health Nutrition in 2015. Regular breakfast consumption may even be used as a prevention tactic. Everyone with diabetes should know their numbers, or the amount of carbohydrates they should aim to eat at every meal. Because this is so individualized, speak with your doctor if you don’t already know your numbers. Your doctor and dietitian can provide guidance. These target goals may be expressed either as grams of carbohydrates per meal or number of exchanges per meal. Knowing your numbers is important when planning your meals. “Sometimes people with type 2 diabetes are more insulin-resistant in the morning than at other times of the day, but this is not always the case,” said Weisenberger. “[Carb goals are] individualized based on preferences, blood sugar control, blood sugar goals, medications, and more.” Once you know your numbers, stock your kitchen with diabetes-friendly breakfast staples. While breakfast is important, choosing a healthy option when you’re short on time ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

Confused about how much you can eat when you have diabetes? First you need to know how much food is in a serving. It may be different from what you expect. Let’s say you eat a cup of rice at dinner. But a serving is actually considered 1/3 cup. So you got three times as many carbs as you thought. To outsmart those mistakes, get to know what a serving size really holds. And for expert help, talk to your dietitian or a certified diabetes educator. 1/2 banana 1 small apple, orange, or pear 1/2 cup chopped, cooked, or canned fruit 1 cup raw leafy vegetables 1/2 cup other vegetables cooked, raw (chopped), or canned 1/2 cup vegetable juice 1 slice of bread 1/2 English muffin, bun, small bagel, or pita bread 1 6-inch tortilla 4-6 crackers 2 rice cakes 1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup cooked cereal, pasta, or bulgur 1/3 cup cooked rice 1 small potato or 1/2 large potato 1/2 cup sweet potatoes or yams 1/2 cup corn kernels or other starchy vegetables such as winter squash, peas, or lima beans 2-3 ounces cooked lean beef, veal, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, or fish 2-3 ounces low-fat natural cheese (such as Swiss, cheddar, Muenster, parmesan, mozzarella, and others) 1/2 cup cooked dry beans 1/4 cup tofu 1 egg (or an equal serving of egg substitute) 2 tablespoons peanut butter 2 ounces processed cheese (American) 1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese 1/2 cup canned tuna (packed in water) 1 cup low-fat milk 1 cup low-fat yogurt (unsweetened, or sweetened with aspartame or other artificial sweeteners) Continue reading >>

Cottage Cheese! - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Cottage Cheese! - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am back after a couple of months. Thanks much for all your help in the past. I have one question about diet. Is fat free cottage cheese good for us ( or ) do we need to avoid it? With my little knowledge, I understand that cottage cheese and milk have lactose and may not be suitable for diabetics. The thing that is confusing me is that it is low in carbs but high in protein. I think the best way to tell if you can tolerate it would be to have a serving and test 2 hrs after the first bite..if you're blood sugar is stable, you'll know it's something you can enjoy. I've never developed a taste for it myself, so I can't speak from personal experience. Personally, I can have milk without a lot of problem. I have it on cereal (Kashi) occasionally with not much rise in blood sugar. If you can tolerate a little milk, I would think you could have the cottage cheese as well. Hi- Well for me personally it works great. I eat it 2,3 sometimes 4 times a day. I prefer non-fat, but will eat low and regular if that's all I can get. I only eat 1/2 to 1 cup. !/2 for a snack and 1 full cup if it's a meal. I put a couple teaspoons of light and fit yogurt to give it a little more flavor and I have fruit with it. That all being said, I don't know if it is better to have low fat or regular. For me i like the lower fat because I have a huge amount of weight to lose. Also what works for me may not work for you. So you can give it a try and test and see if it works for you. I am new to this so maybe I am doing things wrong, but my daily BG levels are great. I test 8-10 times a day. I am also still losing weight. I wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

Flaxceed Oil & Cottage Cheese For Diabetes?!

Flaxceed Oil & Cottage Cheese For Diabetes?!

Flaxceed Oil & Cottage Cheese For Diabetes?! EXPERIENCE: The natural cure for beating diabetes is avoiding all trans fat, hydrogenated fat, fatty acids and replacing with cold pressed oils such as flaxseed oil, Hemp Oil, Cod Liver oil, etc. Avoid all vegetable oils unless cold pressed, avoid processed foods . Mix flaxseed oil with cottage cheese ( Budwig diet ) and together with plenty of fruit and veg, exercise and natural supplements (zinc, chromium,cinnamon, bitter lemon). Your diabetes will be beaten. Give it 7-12 months to work! How can this formula work? My opinion is that only if the pancreas is producing enough insulin. In my case I only produce very little insulin so if I eat too many carbs that my body cant burn quickly guess what---- my glucose sky rockets!!!! Therefore I have to take some insulin just to maintain a somewhat normal level. Please open my eyes and make me understand how this can work for everyone with diabetes. Cant wait to here this one. The formula here generally works for Diabetes Type 2 where the body produces insulin but can't use it properly. The idea is to get enough Omega 3 in your diet of ratio 3:1 against Omega 6. The cells in your body have the sticky Trans Fat around it so that the glucose can not get into it, via the insulin which then it turn transports it in your body to where its needed. The idea is that the cold pressed oil will make the cells more permeable, and hence have less blood sugar. In terms of your pancreas producing more insulin (and therefore working properly) you need to have MSM powder, which provides the nutrients for the Pancreas to work properly. Cinnamon mimics insulin. I hope that helps. You need to try cinnamon and MSM powder (sulfur). In addition try HIT ( high intensive training ) - on an exercise bike - Continue reading >>

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination. Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight. For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories. Can people with diabetes eat cheese? People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone. When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things: Calories Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese. Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes. There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight: stick to small servings choose lower-calorie cheeses use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course Saturated fat Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats. Other experts advise no more than 1 Continue reading >>

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