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Cost Of Insulin In France

Getting Insulin Abroad (in France)

Getting Insulin Abroad (in France)

This story was originally published as a guest post in 2 parts for the Type 1 Diabetes Blog I write bi-weekly for Diabetes Sisters. Before moving to Europe both times, I’ve gotten this question quite often: But how will you get your insulin over there? While studying abroad in France when I was 21, I brought enough insulin for a 3-month stay. I was to be there for 4 months (which turned in to 9 months but that’s another story for another time), but I was supposed to get my visa by the second month. That visa would grant me health benefits akin to French citizens. However, if you’ve ever lived in France, you know how the French bureaucracy works. Read: slowly. Fast forward to month #3, visa “on it’s way- should arrive within the month,” and I’m cracking open the last of my Humalog supply. Obviously, I had to get more- but how, without insurance, without a visa? Without really speaking French? Without a doctor, or any clue where to begin? I emailed my study abroad advisor, and asked for her advice. She wasn’t extremely helpful, but she did send me the address to a walk-in clinic in the area. The next day, with a map in one hand and copies of my American prescriptions in the other, I began Mission Insulin. When I opened the door to the clinic, I was instantly confused. I was expecting what I am used to in the states: walls lined with clean, comfortable chairs, a plethora of health-related magazines, an unenthused secretary perched behind a wall of glass. There were indeed many chairs lining the walls of the small, stuffy room, but there was no secretary. No clipboard where you sign in, no ticket machine to get a number in line. There were 5 other people in the room, speaking quiet French to each other or coughing or checking the time. Because I didn’t kno Continue reading >>

Travelling Around Europe

Travelling Around Europe

Sorry, I can't give you guidance on the mechanics of sorting it out but in France, insulin is available only on prescription. In theory, you can see any doctor to obtain the necessary prescription and repeat prescriptions can be offered but finding an English speaking doctor might be your first challenge. The European Health Insurance Card covers EEC citizens travelling in the EEC. Mine covers me for all but two countries - France (where I live and am therefore covered by their system) and the UK (who pay my pension and who repay France for any outlays on my health) but it only provides a mechanism to avoid some of the costs of treatment. It doesn't provide any evidence of state of health or medication needs. My only advice is that you actually talk to your doctor about your trip and your worries concerning your insulin supply. Obviously, while you should take enough insulin to cover your entire trip, that isn't possible in your case since you are backpacking and staying in hostels. However, you could ask your doctor if he/she has any contacts in the countries you plan on visiting and whether you could contact them to help in replenishing your supplies. The cost for a 10ml vial of Novorapid costs 237,50kr or $41AU and 5x3ml Flexpens of NovoRapid costs 331kr or $57AU (albeit that is here in Sweden which is not on your itinerary) I'm starting to think I shouldn't do this trip. It will be one thing to come from Sydney and have to get registered with the NHS...but finding a doctor/pharmacy in France to get insulin... I have been googling for answers and I think you don't need a script in Spain, but it costs a fortune. Wait wait, I don't want you to give up the trip of a lifetime for something as silly as this. Diabetes should never limit you in life. Something I have come Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes Complications In Six Industrialized Countries

Cost Of Diabetes Complications In Six Industrialized Countries

We collected the costs of diabetes complications in six countries; Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and Spain. The chosen European countries were included in the review because they are the most populous and readily utilize health economic analyses (requiring cost estimates) in decision making for the reimbursement of new technologies. Cost estimates in the UK and US were excluded from this review because they have been/will be reported elsewhere.[ 3 ] Both Australian and Canadian health authorities require that the economic value of new treatments must be demonstrated before reimbursement decisions are made and subsequently cost values for associated complications were included in the review, as the reported data are vital to researchers who may undertake future evaluations.[ 4 , 5 ] Our search of published sources was designed to distinguish the difference between complication costs arising in the first and subsequent years for complications where differences are regularly reported. Reported costs identified in our search were direct costs, those incurred by the third party payer and as such, self payment costs, opportunity costs and costs borne to other parties were excluded from the review. Costs collected were divided into six sections: management costs (cost of standard medication and screening programs); direct cost of cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications; direct cost of renal complications; direct cost of acute events; direct cost of eye disease; and the direct cost of neuropathy and foot ulcer complications. Complications and management costs identified were selected for the collection analysis after reviewing the cost inputs required in previously reported economic analyses. Cost data and evaluative studies published before 1994 were excluded f Continue reading >>

Filling An Insulin Prescription In Europe

Filling An Insulin Prescription In Europe

Filling an insulin prescription in Europe Filling an insulin prescription in Europe I'm insulin-dependent. I buy insulin at home in the US in vials of 100 units, with a prescription. They must be kept refrigerated till I start using an individual vial. Insulin has a "shelf-life" of 28 days after it reaches room temp. So once I take a vial out of the fridge, I must discard it within 28 days whether it's empty or not. I am considering a trip to Europe. So unless I could get a prescrip filled in Europe while I'm there, I could only take 28 days of insulin with me and I'd need to be back home in 28 days or sooner. I've filled a prescrip in Canada by finding a walk-in clinic that'd take a US citizen and the Dr wrote me a prescrip a Canadian pharmacy would fill, using my written US prescrip, of course, which I had with me So my question now is: is it reasonable to expect that I might find places like that in Europe that would also write a prescrip, using my USA one, that a local pharm would fill? If so, it would mean I could plan a longer trip than 28 days, which I would REALLY like to do! I am delighted the Frio will be good for you. It really is a superb piece of kit and whenever travelling to warm/hot countries it has never let me down. What makes it so good is that it only needs cold water and each 'fill' lasts about 5 days. When you feel the crystals through the material you simply buy some more cold water! BTW it was another regular and long-time contributor here, billbarr, who tipped me off about the Frio. It's a British product now available in the USA and he has used one for years during his travels to Greece. He did me a huge favor when he wrote me about it just before a trip to Spain when I was worried about the hot temperatures and how it would affect my insulin Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly Raised U.s. Prices Of Diabetes Drug 700 Percent Over 20 Years

Eli Lilly Raised U.s. Prices Of Diabetes Drug 700 Percent Over 20 Years

Eli Lilly Raised U.S. Prices Of Diabetes Drug 700 Percent Over 20 Years Eli Lilly, an Indianapolis based company, that has sold insulin products to diabetes patients since 1921, has quietly raised some U.S. prices 700 percent in the last 20 years by marketing so-called improved versions to consumers. Novo Nordisk, a Danish company, has also profited handsomely from this practice. Insulin is a $23 billion global business with over 75 percent of the revenue coming from such new and improved versions. A recent Washington Post analysis of the price increases has stirred up outrage. The newspaper noted that Humalog, an Eli Lilly brand of insulin that was sold for $21 per bottle in the U.S. 20 years ago, is now priced at $255, which represents a 700 percent markup, after adjusting for inflation. "People are dying or getting sicker because they can't afford their insulin, just so Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk can make outrageous profits ," Bernie Sanders, a U.S. senator and former presidential candidate, tweeted. "The history of insulin captures one of the mystifying complexities of the pharmaceutical market - how long-standing drugs become more expensive with time and competition fails to hold down prices," writes Carolyn Y. Johnson in the Washington Post. "Companies point to improvements in their drugs, but medical experts say some of those changes are simply a strategy to keep prices high with new patent protections." "I don't think it takes a cynic such as myself to see most of these drugs are being developed to preserve patent protection," David Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor, told the newspaper. "The truth is they are marginally different, and the clinical benefits of them over the older drugs have been zero." In reality, part of the problem is also the private Continue reading >>

U.s. Pays Much More Than Uk For Insulin

U.s. Pays Much More Than Uk For Insulin

A study finds that U.S. consumers pay between 5.7 times and 7.5 times more for Lantus and NovoRapid than UK consumers. A new study finds that people with diabetes in the U.S. are paying between 5.7 times and 7.5 times more than those in the UK for two popular insulins and a rare drug to treat diabetic retinopathy. U.S. consumers absorb this higher cost despite often not being the first in line to have access to new drugs or medical device treatments. According to a Reuters report, researchers from the University of Liverpool (UK) analyzed the drug prices for 20 top-selling drugs worldwide, including Sanofi’s Lantus, Novo Nordisk’s NovoRapid insulins, and Roche’s Lucentis, a macular degeneration drug recently approved by the FDA to treat diabetic retinopathy. U.S. consumers ended up paying 5.7 times more for Lantus, 7.5. times more for NovoRapid, and 7.5 times more for Lucentis than their UK counterparts, according to a chart published by the Daily Mail (UK). The average price difference of the Top 20 drugs sold was 3 times higher in the U.S than in the UK. The gap between drug prices in the U.S. and prices in other industrialized countries is even greater – 6 times higher than in Brazil and 16 times higher than in India, for example. That difference comes mostly because other countries implement price controls, while the U.S. usually allows the market to set prices, according to a Reuters report. In the report, representatives of the pharmaceutical industry pushed back against the study, saying that the market price for a drug is often not the one paid by the consumer, as many insurers demand a deep discount. In 2014, for example, Sanofi’s then-CEO Chris Viehbacher warned that sales for Lantus might flatline as insurers would demand discounts in 2015 for the p Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin If Working In France

How To Get Insulin If Working In France

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My daughter is going to work as a chalet host for 4-5 months in France. She is a UK resident, type 1 Diabetic on Lantus and Novorapid, but planning to switch to a pump soon, and has a European Health card - can she get medication when she is in France, and will she have to pay for it ? Hope all goes well for your daughter in France! This is about using an EHIC. It would be different if she was paying French contributions and tax... though given my experience with the system she would only just about get registered when it was time to go home. She will have to pay up front to see a doctor to get a prescription If she has any lab tests she would again pay upfront. She will only be reimbursed at 70% for doctors visits /lab costs (of I think 22 for a GP, 41 for a specialist about 20; for an HbA1c ) She may be better going to a diabetologue , I don't think many T1s are cared for by GPs but of course any doctor can prescribe insulin. Be very careful though about whether they are sector 1 or 2. Sector 2 docs can charge considerably more than the amount the authorities will base their reimbursement on. ) Again at the the chemists she will probably have to pay upfront for for insulin/strips etc Prices (2010) 5 rapid insulin pens 43,18 euros, 5 basal pens (lantus or levimir) 67.41E, 1 vial rapid insulin 21,65 E I am not certain whether she will be 100% reimbursed for insulin, the article suggests that some medications get 100% back, and insulin seems to me to be an essential medici Continue reading >>

Advice Needed! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & Want To Move To France

Advice Needed! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & Want To Move To France

FrenchEntre The Forum Living in France Health and Social Welfare ADVICE NEEDED! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & want to move to France ADVICE NEEDED! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & want to move to France Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total) Im 52 and want to move to as far South in France as I can, with my 17 yr old and 2 cats! I have limited funds and want to know what you do about insulin and other medication, Diabetic advice and driving (do you insure from the UK or in France?). I need to do this move now, rather than never fulfil my dream. My grandmother lived in the South of France and so I feel comfortable down thereAny help and advice will really help me. I dont earn much but I have my own internet business, and so internet connection (as fast as possible) is really important.Tax? You seem to need a lot of advice. I would suggest you put each question into the relevant section i.e. tax queries in the Taxation section and be specific about what you want to know. You may have to give a bit of personal information or you may just want to know how to register. As for the diabetes, I am type 2 and get treated very well. I am on insulin and my doctor sends me for blood tests every 3 months and then I have a consultation with him. All the meds here are practically the same but here is the problem. I am registered with CPAM (the French Health System) but I am not sure what you will have to do as new immigrants come under different rules. I believe you have to have an S1 from Newcastle which will cover you for around 18 months. I get free treatment for diabetes as a Ailment longe duree with 100% refund but I dont know if this will apply to you under the new system. You need some serious advice on this as your health cover could cost you a lot of money. Also, as you say you will be Continue reading >>

Cost Of Lantus In France, Order Insulin Ml Dose

Cost Of Lantus In France, Order Insulin Ml Dose

Cost of lantus in france, order insulin ml dose Generic drugs contain the same active ingredients as the original brand drugs. We use the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) protocol which enables end-to-end data protection. All invoices are sent via e-mail as confirmation of order. Please note that orders are shipped on business days only (Monday to Friday, with the exception of public holidays). the initial starting dose of lantus should be 10 units diabetes natural medicine add ml lantus 100 ul can take hawthorn aphids get rid lantus can be used contained by a sliding scale The best pharmacists of the country worked together! A lot of people choose generics because a lot of money is spent by the manufacturers of brand-name drugs to advertise their products. Please refer to the current privacy policy in the terms & conditions section of our order page. We provide delivery to almost all countries around the world. You may order any version, though generic production is many times cheaper due to the lack of promotions, which inflates the cost of a good. In some cases, due to credit card company policies, credit card payment may not be available for certain products and other payment options may be presented. Buying a generic medication one pays less but gets the very same result. Our direct medicines suppliers are based in India - the largest drug manufacturer country, holding more than 80% of pharmacopoeia market today. Most orders are processed and shipped within 24 hours of being received price of lantus cure blood sugar medicine ve been type 1 for 32 years and over the last 10 years have been on the lantus novo mix lantus should work without lows whether you eat or not which is probably why you haven You can see all our shipping rates and other information after selecting a Continue reading >>

Insulin/needles - Need An Rx When Travelling From Us To...

Insulin/needles - Need An Rx When Travelling From Us To...

Insulin/needles - need an RX when travelling from US to... - Paris Forum Insulin/needles - need an RX when travelling from US to... My mother in law asked me if she needs a perscription for her diabetic medications and insulin/syringes when traveling to Paris from the States (for customs purposes). If you're diabetic, please let me know what you take when you go to France . 1.Re: Insulin/needles - need an RX when travelling from US to... Yes, otherwise she won't be able to get them onto the plane in the US;also if she looses/breaks her insulin she will be able to replace it more easily if she has the prescription. Make sure she has a Medalert bracelet or neck chain too. 2.Re: Insulin/needles - need an RX when travelling from US to... One needs one's doctor to provide a list of medications and doses. It is handy for you to have a copy of the list in case of medical emergency. They state that all medications must be in a labeled prescription bottle. One may only take up to 90 days or the amount for you vacation time without a visa permission request to bring more. Please note one must call Insulin company to find out if particular medication is available in France . ( In case yours is lost stolen or contaminated. Last time I went a most popular insulin drug was not available in France. I also keep a copy of my eye glass prescription in case of breakage I can replace the lense . We took my daughter's needles and medication to Mexico and no one asked or even looked. She had a doctor's note also. 6.Re: Insulin/needles - need an RX when travelling from US to... I found this on the State Department's website. Hope it's helpful: If you go abroad with preexisting medical problems, you should carry a letter from you doctor describing your condition, including information on any Continue reading >>

Lilly Insulin Prices Come Under Microscope

Lilly Insulin Prices Come Under Microscope

Home Lilly insulin prices come under microscope Lilly insulin prices come under microscope Medical device tax is history, ending years of frustration for Indiana companies Over the past 20 years, while the price of a gallon of milk climbed 23 percent and the sticker on a Dodge Caravan minivan rose 21 percent, the list price of the insulin Humalog, made by Eli Lilly and Co., shot up 1,157 percent. Other Lilly insulins saw hefty price increases, too, including Humulin, on the market since 1982. It has seen price increases totaling nearly 800 percent over the last two decades. The soaring prices at Indianapolis-based Lillyand two other insulin makers, whose prices are climbing at similar ratesare sending sticker shock through the diabetes community. In recent months, patients have filed lawsuits and called for congressional investigations, and now theyre planning a demonstration next month in front of Lillys headquarters on South Delaware Street. The actions are casting a bright glare on Lillys oldest and perhaps most famous franchise. The company was the first to mass produce insulin in the 1920s, a move that allowed it to attract scientists and make other breakthroughs in fields from cancer to depression. Its a critical time for Lilly, as it tries to increase its dominance in the $10 billion diabetes-drug market against chief rivals Sanofi of France and Novo Nordisk of Denmark. Lilly CEO David Ricks continues to point to diabetes as a key area for investment and growth, but the companys ability to keep patients and physicians satisfied could depend on how well it addresses their concerns over prices. Already, some physicians say high insulin prices across the industry are causing financially strapped patients to ration or discontinue their medicines, which could lead to Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

The doctor led me to a large, clean, bright-white room. It had everything that a doctor's office in the US has, such as an exam table, medical posters on the walls, and sterilization equipment, but it also had a large desk with a computer and several chairs. Luckily, this doctor spoke English. (During my second visit several months later, however, the doctor did NOT speak English, so thankfully by then my French was at a much, much higher level.) I didn't need an exam, so we went straight to his desk. I told him I had Type 1 diabetes. I told him I took Humalog and Lantus and Freestyle test strips (all of these are available in Europe.) He didn't ask for proof, for statements from doctors or prior prescriptions. He simply typed it all into the system and printed a prescription paper out for me. He put 2 refills on it and told me to come back when I needed more. As I stated in Part 1, I didn't have scurit sociale (health insurance benefits) yet. In the US, even going to a walk-in clinic located in a tiny room in the back of a drugstore can cost $100 or more if you don't have insurance. This exchange in France cost 22 euros. If I'd had insurance, it would have been free. In fact, it still was free in the long run, because once I had my insurance, I simply submitted a claim and was reimbursed for my visit. But at the time, I paid the 22 euros directly to him, as his exam room that doubled as a consultation area also tripled as the secretarial office. And with that, I set off for the pharmacy. Although my walk-in clinic visit had been surprisingly inexpensive, I was still trembling with fear of how much my insulin would cost without insurance, because I know how much it costs in the US and it is absolutely terrifying. I handed the pharmacist (who also luckily spoke English) Continue reading >>

Rising Insulin Prices: What Can Be Done?

Rising Insulin Prices: What Can Be Done?

Media Matters: Can Anything Be Done About High Insulin Prices? Written by Dan Fleshler on April 14, 2016 Please welcome back Dan Fleshler, New York-based longtime type 1, writer, media strategist and periodic correspondent here at the 'Mine, with another take on hot topics in the diabetes news. If your life depends on insulin like ours do, you won't want to miss this savvy assessment of access issues. Solving the Insulin Cost Crisis, by Dan Fleshler Its easy to imagine the stressed-out faces of people handling public relations for Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi on February 20th. Thats when Break Up the Insulin Racket, a guided missile aimed at the three companies that control the insulin market, appeared in the New York Times . The column by Kasia Lipskaan endocrinologist at Yaleattacked the Big Three for the skyrocketing cost of insulin. Lipksas piece was the most prominent in a recent spate of stories about high insulin prices. Taken together, they provided strongthough anecdotalevidence that the cost of the medication is prompting more and more PWDs to drastically reduce insulin intake or even do without it. While this coverage provided a good overview of the problem, I searched in vain for convincing solutions. The media flurry began on January 28th with a Marketwatch report on an earnings call by Lillys CEO, John Lechleiter, who said: Yes, they (drugs) can be expensive, but disease is a lot more expensive. D-advocates including Kelly Kunik , Leighann Calentine and our own Mike Hoskins here at the 'Mine railed against the insensitivity and lack of responsiveness by Lilly and other insulin manufacturers to what may well be an emerging health crisis. Several stories tried to explain how we got into this mess, including an overview by Diabetes Forecasts Allison Ts Continue reading >>

Direct Medical Costs Of Type 2 Diabetes In France: An Insurance Claims Database Analysis

Direct Medical Costs Of Type 2 Diabetes In France: An Insurance Claims Database Analysis

, Volume 2, Issue2 , pp 209219 | Cite as Direct Medical Costs of Type 2 Diabetes in France: An Insurance Claims Database Analysis Our objects was to estimate the direct healthcare costs of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in France in 2013. Data were drawn from a random sample of 600,000 patients registered in the French national health insurances database, which covers 90% of the French population. An algorithm was used to select patients with T2DM. Direct healthcare costs from a collective perspective were derived from the database and compared with those from a control group to estimate the cost of diabetes and related comorbidities. Overall direct costs were also compared according to the diabetes therapies used throughout the year 2013. Cost analysis was available for a sample of 25,987 patients with T2DM (mean age 67.5standard deviation 12.5; 53.9% male) matched with a control group of 76,406 individuals without diabetes. Overall per patient per year medical expenditures were 650610,106 in the T2DM group as compared with 36686954 in the control group. The cost difference between the two groups was 2838 per patient per year, mainly due to hospitalizations, medication and nursing care costs. Total per capita annual costs were lowest for patients receiving metformin monotherapy (41536170) and highest for those receiving insulin (12,890). However, apart from patients receiving insulin, costs did not differ markedly across the different oral treatment patterns. Extrapolating these results to the whole T2DM population in France, total direct costs of diagnosed T2DM in 2013 was estimated at over 8.5 billion. This estimate highlights the substantial economic burden of this condition on society. The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s41669-017-0050-3 ) contains Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control. In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer." Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin. Greene decided to call some local pharmacies, to ask about low-cost options. He was told no such options existed. "Only then did I realize there is no such thing as generic insulin in the United States in the year 2015," he says. Greene wondered why that was the case. Why was a medicine more than 90 years old so expensive? He started looking into the history of insulin, and has published a paper about his findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The story of insulin, it turns out, starts back in the late 1800s. That's when scientists discovered a link between diabetes and damaged cells in the pancreas — cells that produce insulin. In the early 1920s, researchers in Toronto extracted insulin from cattle pancreases and gave it to people who had diabetes, as part of a clinical trial. The first patient was a 14-year-old boy, who made a dramatic recovery. Most others recovered as well. Soon, insulin from pigs and cattle was being produced and sold on a massive scale around the world. But for some, the early forms of the medicine weren't ideal. Many people required multiple injections every day, and some developed minor allergic reactions. Over the next few decades, scientists figured out how to produce higher-quality insulin, Greene says. They made the drug purer, so recipients had fewer bad reaction Continue reading >>

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