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Cost Of A1c

Point-of-care Hemoglobin A1c Testing: A Budget Impact Analysis

Point-of-care Hemoglobin A1c Testing: A Budget Impact Analysis

Go to: Overuse, underuse, and misuse of interventions are important concerns in health care and lead to individuals receiving unnecessary or inappropriate care. In April 2012, under the guidance of the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee's Appropriateness Working Group, Health Quality Ontario (HQO) launched its Appropriateness Initiative. The objective of this initiative is to develop a systematic framework for the ongoing identification, prioritization, and assessment of health interventions in Ontario for which there is possible misuse, overuse, or underuse. For more information on HQO's Appropriateness Initiative, visit our website at www.hqontario.ca. The Programs for the Assessment of Technology in Health (PATH) Research Institute was commissioned by Health Quality Ontario to evaluate the budget impact and predict the costs of point-of-care testing for hemoglobin A1c for the management of diabetes. The budget impact of implementing each intervention is estimated. Health Quality Ontario conducts full evidence-based analyses, including economic analyses, of health technologies being considered for use in Ontario. These analyses are then presented to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee, whose mandate it is to examine proposed health technologies in the context of available evidence and existing clinical practice, and to provide advice and recommendations to Ontario health care practitioners, the broader health care system, and the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. DISCLAIMER: Health Quality Ontario uses a standardized costing method for its economic analyses. The main cost categories and associated methods of retrieval from the province's perspective are described below. Hospital costs: Ontario Case Costing Initiative cost data are u Continue reading >>

Medical Claim Cost Impact Of Improved Diabetes Control For Medicare And Commercially Insured Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Medical Claim Cost Impact Of Improved Diabetes Control For Medicare And Commercially Insured Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Kathryn Fitch, RN, MEd; Bruce S. Pyenson, FSA, MAAA; and Kosuke Iwasaki, FIAJ, MAAA ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Diabetes prevalence is increasing in the United States, yet the control of critical clinical metrics (e.g., hemoglobin A1c [A1c], blood pressure, and lipids) remains suboptimal. Lower A1c levels have been shown to be associated with lower diabetes complication rates, and reduced medical costs have been reported in individuals with diabetes who have improved glycemic control. While many studies have quantified the impact of A1c control on medical claim costs, this article provides new information on the cost and event impact of better control for all 3 metrics for the commercial population and Medicare population separately. OBJECTIVES: To (a) quantify current type 2 diabetes control rates for A1c, blood pressure, and lipids and (b) model the impact of scenarios for better control of these metrics on diabetes complication rates and complication costs in people with diabetes in commercially insured and Medicare populations. METHODS: 858 adults with commercial (n = 392) or Medicare (n = 466) cov- erage and type 2 diabetes were identified from approximately 10,000 indi- viduals in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; combined series 2005-2006 and 2007-2008). Based on each individual’s risk factors, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study modeling tool was used to project rates of 7 diabetes complications under status quo A1c, blood pressure, and lipid levels and complication rates under better man- agement. Three improved management scenarios were created to model the impact of better control in all commercially insured and Medicare individuals with type 2 diabetes who had A1c, blood pressure, or lipids not at goal and in a subset of Continue reading >>

3 Key Questions In T2dm Care: Cv Protection, Cost, And A1c Goals

3 Key Questions In T2dm Care: Cv Protection, Cost, And A1c Goals

3 Key Questions in T2DM Care: CV Protection, Cost, and A1c Goals New and effective drugs are available to combat the growing type 2 diabetes epidemic. However, new drugs are giving rise to new questions for which there are no easy answers. For example, should lower-risk patients get drugs with proven cardiovascular (CV) benefits, or should these agents be reserved for those with established CV disease? Does the efficacy of the new treatments justify their cost? How aggressively should glycemic goals be pursued and how ambitious should those goals be in the first place? Patient Care recently spoke with William H. Herman, MD, MPH, the Stefan S. Fajans/GlaxoSmithKline Professor of Diabetes and Director of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, to discuss the latest controversies with new diabetes drugs, clinical trials, and guidelines. We have a lot of different medications now available, and we have data on for whom they seem to be most effective, says Herman, who spoke on these unresolved questions at the ACP Internal Medicine Meeting 2018 in New Orleans, Louisiana. I think the main issue is to personalize treatment according to each individual patient's needs, both with respect to target levels of glycemia and to the choice of agents. Key Question 1: Which drugs should we give? Continue reading >>

Leveraging Benefit Design For Better Diabetes Self-management And A1c Control

Leveraging Benefit Design For Better Diabetes Self-management And A1c Control

The American Journal of Managed Care > February 2018 Published on: February 16, 2018 Leveraging Benefit Design for Better Diabetes Self-Management and A1C Control Abiy Agiro, PhD; Yiqiong Xie, PhD; Kevin Bowman, MD; and Andrea DeVries, PhD Patients with diabetes receiving insulin treatment with lower cost sharing for blood glucose testing strips were more likely to achieve glycemic control than those with higher cost sharing. Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between cost sharing for blood glucose testing strips and glycemic control rates. Study Design: A retrospective observational study using medical and pharmacy claims data integrated with laboratory glycated hemoglobin (A1C) values for patients using insulin and testing strips. A new user study design was utilized to identify individuals from 14 commercial US health plans who filled testing strips with assumed intention to monitor blood glucose. Methods: Patients were divided into low (<20% of annual testing strip cost; n = 3575) and high (20%; n = 3580)cost-sharing categories. We compared the likelihood of patients in low and high cost-sharing categories achieving glycemic control (A1C <8.0%) through modified Poisson regression models. Results: Patients with low cost sharing for testing strips had higher rates of control than those with high cost sharing (58.1% vs 50.3%; P <.001). Low cost sharing was associated with greater probability of glycemic control (adjusted risk ratio [aRR], 1.14; 95% CI, 1.09-1.20; P <.0001). Glycemic control was more likely for patients in areas with median household income greater than $60,000 versus less than $40,000 (aRR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.07-1.25; P <.01) and greater than $80,000 versus less than $40,000 (aRR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.32; P <.01). Conclusions: We found a statistica Continue reading >>

A1c Test Now Available For Cats And Dogs

A1c Test Now Available For Cats And Dogs

Hemoglobin A1c testing has been the gold standard for years for the diagnosis and management of diabetes in humans. Today, veterinarians can use a similar test for their patients. Diabetes is a common disease in both animals and people that requires consistent ongoing monitoring and management. Measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels has long been the primary tool for diagnosing, monitoring, and managing diabetes in people. Until now, A1c measurement has not been available in pets due to cost and the amount of time to get a result. Baycom Diagnostics has developed A1Care, the first cost-effective hemoglobin A1c blood glucose diagnostic test kit for feline and canine diabetes. The test is easy to use and requires only a few drops of dried blood. Here’s how it works: The practice fills out a test request form and then fills in 2 circles on the form with whole blood from the patient. After the blood has dried, the form is mailed to Baycom and typically received in 3 to 5 business days. Samples are tested the day they arrive, and results are mailed, emailed, and available by entering in a code from the test request form. The tests are run in the Florida State University Department of Biology Hybridoma Core Facility. Why A1c? The benefit of using A1c levels over the traditional tests that employ fructosamine to manage diabetes is that A1c gives 6 times more data by providing an average blood glucose level for the previous 70 days in cats and 110 days in dogs. “Testing for A1c in people with diabetes has been the gold standard for over a decade,” says Gustav Ray, president and CEO of Baycom Diagnostics. “It is the one test that gives doctors a 120-day report card on how the body has been managing its sugar levels. For the first time, we are offering this Continue reading >>

A1c Blood Sugar Test

A1c Blood Sugar Test

Get a hemoglobin A1C blood sugar test at a lab near you for $34.16. Results in 3-5 business days. The A1C blood sugar test measures your average blood sugar over the last 3 months. High blood sugar could mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. Order Test Available in CA, CT, FL, GA, IL, MD, MI, MO, OH, OR, PA, SC, VA, and WA. Not available in AZ, NY and RI. Convenient affordable care for all Americans We set up Lemonaid to help Americans get the convenient great care they need, regardless of insurance. Lemonaid is for people like you who are busy and care about their health. We think you should be able to get the care and labs you need when you want it and at a price you can afford. We’ve launched our A1C blood sugar testing service because we want to make it as simple and low cost as possible for you to understand your risk of diabetes and prediabetes. If you’ve got symptoms of diabetes, a family history of diabetes, or you’re 40 and over and overweight or obese, you should consider testing your blood sugar levels. 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year and about 7 million Americans have diabetes but don’t know it. How we can help Understand your average blood sugar levels with the help of our doctors Our A1C blood sugar testing service lets you understand your blood sugar levels without having to go to a doctor’s office before you go to the lab. If the A1C test shows you have high blood sugar levels then this could be a sign that you have diabetes or prediabetes. Another name for the A1C test is the HbA1c test. The A1C test shows your average blood sugar levels over the last 3 months. By comparison, most home tests tell you your blood sugar level at a single point in time. Unlike other online lab testing services, our doctors help you in Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (496)

Hemoglobin A1c (496)

1 mL whole blood collected in an EDTA (lavender-top) tube Sodium fluoride/oxalate (gray-top) tubes Heparinized plasma Set up: Daily a.m., nights; Report available: Next day Hemoglobin A1c is observed to be lower in healthy pregnant women than healthy non-pregnant women. Medical conditions associated with high red blood cell turnover are associated with lower hemoglobin A1c results. To assist with control of blood glucose levels, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended glycated hemoglobin testing (HbA1c) twice a year for patients with stable glycemia, and quarterly for patients with poor glucose control. Interpretative ranges are based on ADA guidelines. The Result and LOINC information listed below should not be used for electronic interface maintenance with Quest Diagnostics. Please contact the Quest Diagnostics Connectivity Help Desk for more information at 800-697-9302.NOTE: The codes listed in the table below are not orderable Test Codes. Reference ranges are provided as general guidance only. To interpret test results use the reference range in the laboratory report. The CPT codes provided are based on AMA guidelines and are for informational purposes only. CPT coding is the sole responsibility of the billing party. Please direct any questions regarding coding to the payer being billed. LOINC assignment is based on a combination of test attributes, including the method used by the performing laboratory. For tests not performed by Quest Diagnostics, codes are assigned by the performing laboratory. * The tests listed by specialist are a select group of tests offered. For a complete list of Quest Diagnostics tests, please refer to our Directory of Services. Continue reading >>

Medical Claim Cost Impact Of Improved Diabetes Control For Medicare Andcommercially Insured Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

Medical Claim Cost Impact Of Improved Diabetes Control For Medicare Andcommercially Insured Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

1. J Manag Care Pharm. 2013 Oct;19(8):609-20, 620a-620d. Medical claim cost impact of improved diabetes control for medicare andcommercially insured patients with type 2 diabetes. (1)Milliman, One Pennsylvania Plaza, 38th Fl., New York, NY 10119, USA. [email protected] BACKGROUND: Diabetes prevalence is increasing in the United States, yet thecontrol of critical clinical metrics (e.g., hemoglobin A1c [A1c], blood pressure,and lipids) remains suboptimal. Lower A1c levels have been shown to be associatedwith lower diabetes complication rates, and reduced medical costs have beenreported in individuals with diabetes who have improved glycemic control. Whilemany studies have quantified the impact of A1c control on medical claim costs,this article provides new information on the cost and event impact of bettercontrol for all 3 metrics for the commercial population and Medicare populationseparately.OBJECTIVES: To (a) quantify current type 2 diabetes control rates for A1c, blood pressure, and lipids and (b) model the impact of scenarios for better control of these metrics on diabetes complication rates and complication costs in peoplewith diabetes in commercially insured and Medicare populations.METHODS: 858 adults with commercial (n = 392) or Medicare (n = 466) coverage and type 2 diabetes were identified from approximately 10,000 individuals in theNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; combined series2005-2006 and 2007-2008). Based on each individual's risk factors, the UnitedKingdom Prospective Diabetes Study modeling tool was used to project rates of 7diabetes complications under status quo A1c, blood pressure, and lipid levels andcomplication rates under better management. Three improved management scenarioswere created to model the impact of bett Continue reading >>

A1c Test For Diabetes

A1c Test For Diabetes

The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Diagnosing Diabetes With A1c

The Pros And Cons Of Diagnosing Diabetes With A1c

An International Expert Committee was convened in 2008 by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the International Diabetes Federation to consider the means for diagnosing diabetes in nonpregnant individuals, with particular focus on the possibility to indicate A1C as an alternative if not a better tool (1). After reviewing the available literature and a thorough discussion on the advantages and the limits of previous diagnostic strategies (essentially based on fasting glucose assessment) and the considered alternative approach (based on A1C measurement), a consensus was reached that the latter (i.e., A1C) should be included among diagnostic tools for diabetes and, with the exception of a number of clinical conditions, should even be preferred in diabetes diagnosis in nonpregnant adults. The main conclusion of the International Expert Committee was implemented in the most recent clinical recommendations issued by the ADA. However, in these guidelines, A1C is indicated as a diagnostic tool alternative but not superior to blood glucose, leaving to the health care professional the decision about what test to use in an individual. The World Health Organization is currently examining the proposal made by the International Expert Committee and is carefully addressing the controversial issues still remaining, most of which have been the subject of letters to the editor and articles recently published in the literature. Nevertheless, the use of A1C for diagnosing diabetes is rapidly becoming a reality in many Western countries. In the text that follows, one of us (E.B.) will present the main points supporting A1C (pros) and the other (J.T.) will illustrate the main counterpoints challenging A1C (cons) as the primary tool Continue reading >>

'healthy You Heart Screening,' 'hemoglobin A1c Diabetic Screening' Events Planned In Area During September

'healthy You Heart Screening,' 'hemoglobin A1c Diabetic Screening' Events Planned In Area During September

'Healthy You Heart Screening,' 'Hemoglobin A1C Diabetic Screening' Events Planned In Area During September The Union Hospital Community Health and Wellness Department will host several low-cost health screening events during the month of September at various area locations. Appointments are required for both the Healthy You Heart Screening blood test and the Hemoglobin A1C Diabetic Screening blood test, and can be made online on the Health Events section of the hospital website at www.unionhospital.org or by calling (330) 308-3599. The Healthy You Heart Screening will have four locations accepting appointments: Sept. 6 from 7:30 to 11 a.m. at the New Philadelphia location of Buehlers Fresh Foods Sept. 11 from 8 to 10 a.m. at the Tuscarawas County YMCA at Dover Sept. 13 from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Tuscarawas County Senior Center at Dover Sept. 20 from 7:30 to 11 a.m. at the Dover location of Buehlers Fresh Foods The heart screening tests for total cholesterol, good (HDL) and bad (LDL) cholesterol, as well as triglycerides and blood sugar readings. Results are most accurate after a 12-hour fast. The cost is $9. The Hemoglobin A1C Diabetic Screening is scheduled Sept. 26 from 8 a.m. to noon at the Giant Eagle grocery store in Dover. The non-fasting A1C test checks management of blood sugar and is key in reducing the health complications of diabetes. The cost is $5. All health screening events are conducted by the professional nursing staff of the Union Hospital Community Health and Wellness Department. Information about Union Hospital and all of its services available to the community is available on the hospital website at www.unionhospital.org , and on the hospitals pages on Facebook and Twitter (@Union_Hospital). Continue reading >>

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

The A1C, a Glycated hemoglobin, is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average blood glucose concentration. The A1C test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is only four months. In other words, it’s the indication of your blood sugar level for a three-month period. Typically, your doctor will test your A1C levels every 90 to 180 days depending on how well your blood sugar levels have been managed. In basic terms, the A1C test checks to see how much glucose is attaching to your red blood cells. You can work to keep your A1C within your target range using a recommended diabetes management regimen along with a well-managed diet, exercise routine and other healthy lifestyle . Normal a1C Prediabetes a1C Diabetic a1c Under 5.7 5.7 to 6.4 6.5 and above A1C Test Features and Pricing While most hospital conducted A1C tests cost around $86 per test (depending on your co-pay), you can now buy the A1C self-check home kit for around $40. Each kit includes one test with two strips, but you can buy a double test kit as well. The kits are not reusable so once you use your two lancets, you must buy another kit. Use Most people use this test every 30 days instead of waiting 90 days to be seen by the doctor. This helps patients have a more accurate reading on where their levels fall throughout the month. Insurance Coverage Most insurances will cover 1 or 2 tests per year and some hospitals will have a sample take-home A1C test that you can ask for. However, not all hospitals do so you may still need to buy over the counter kits depending on how many results a year you want to have or how many your doctor requires. Pros and Cons of Home Testing The A1C at home kit needs four large drops of blood which is eas Continue reading >>

A1c Test In Griffin, Ga

A1c Test In Griffin, Ga

Get your A1c Test results securely and privately. An A1c Test checks your A1c level.People in Griffin, GA orderan A1c Test for general screening or ongoing tracking. Our A1c Test price includesthe doctor's order that you need to get tested in Griffin, GA, alllab fees and taxes, and a pdf copy of your results. For currentprices, CLICK HERE . For a sample report of an A1c Test,please CLICK HERE . "I just wanted to take a minute to thank all of you for your patience and extremely good service in regard to my recent lab tests.Your ability to provide me a fast, professional, affordable and reliable way to quantify these problems has been invaluable. I can assure you that I will be be areturn customer, and will refer you to my friends. Thanks again for everything!" At Accesa Labs, we realize that getting an A1c Test in a fast, affordable manner can be challening. Even if you find a place,a lot of unknowns about the lab testing process inevitably come up: - Where do I get my doctor's lab order for the test? - How long does it take to get my lab test results? At Accesa Labs, our A1c Test service was designed to answer those questions: - A1c Test prices include a certified lab order that is usable at affiliated Griffin, GA locations Continue reading >>

Using A1c Test Is Cost-effective To Diagnose Prediabetes

Using A1c Test Is Cost-effective To Diagnose Prediabetes

Using A1c to catch prediabetes is cost-effective if the threshold for diagnosis is set at 5.7%…. The cost of treating patients for an HbA1c level less than 5.7% would likely outweigh the savings from improvement in long-term outcomes, according to an analysis by Xiaohui Zhuo, PhD, of the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues largely at the same agency. Those diagnostic cutoffs wouldn’t fall within the $50,000 per quality life-year gained, typically considered cost-effective. "Lowering the cutoff from 5.7% to 5.6% also may be cost effective, however, if the costs of preventive interventions were to be lowered," the group noted. The threshold for diagnosing prediabetes became controversial in 2009, when the American Diabetes Association recommended using hemoglobin A1c as the new standard diagnostic test for diabetes and prediabetes. That organization indicated 6.5% as the cutoff for frank diabetes, but the level indicating prediabetes has variably been set anywhere from 6.0% to 5.5% by different professional groups. "Establishing an A1c cutoff for prediabetes, however, has been more challenging than for diabetes because the relationship between the incidence of type 2 diabetes and A1c below 6.5% is continuous, with no clearly demarcated threshold that is associated with an accelerated risk of diabetes or other morbidities," Zhou’s group explained. They ran simulations using a nationally-representative sample of the nondiabetic adult population in the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES 1999 to 2006), modeling the impact of each 0.1% increment in the threshold for prediabetes from 6.4% to 5.5%. Each lower threshold progressively improved health of the population considered over a lifetime from the healthcare system perspective but also increased cost Continue reading >>

Feds Say “no” To Finger-stick A1c: Health Screening Compliance

Feds Say “no” To Finger-stick A1c: Health Screening Compliance

Afew months ago, my company was engaged in a RFP process for one of our most valued municipal clients of over 3 years. As part of that process, our client asked us to provide pricing for “point of care” (a.k.a. finger-stick) Hemoglobin A1c testing. As we began to explain that, practically speaking, there is no compliant solution available for finger-stick A1c, we were surprised to hear that other health screening vendors were proud to offer this test. To provide some background, finger-stick A1c products were developed to help people who have already been diagnosed with diabetes monInterlinitor their blood sugar levels. Over time screening companies began to use these Hemoglobin A1c tests in the field. A few years ago, the FDA issued a letter to manufacturers of finger-stick A1c test kits clarifying that the tests are only approved for monitoring and that no A1c test had been cleared to diagnose diabetes. Now, understand that health screening vendors do not diagnose, we screen. Screened individuals who show a likely condition are referred to a physician for formal diagnosis. Therefore, health screening vendors continued to offer finger-stick A1c under the assumption that as long as the test was used to screen, not diagnose participants, it would comply with the intended restriction. However, in 2013, manufacturers of finger-stick A1c solutions began discontinuing their lines of finger-stick A1c products, including Bayer who then manufactured a product labeled A1cNow+®. The A1cNow+® product is now manufactured by PTS for its intended purpose of monitoring the blood sugar levels of people already diagnosed with diabetes. The manufacturer’s insert clearly states “This test is NOT for the screening or diagnosis of diabetes” under the section labeled “Limitatio Continue reading >>

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