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Coping With Diabetes

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes

10 Tips For Coping With Diabetes

Sometimes you will have those days where you’re discouraged and feel completely overwhelmed with your diabetes. It’s important when you’re feeling this way to take a step back and challenge your perspective so you can find a way to stay motivated to keep moving forward. Managing diabetes is an ongoing process, and there are so many daily tasks involved with your management, which can become challenging at times. We wanted to share some encouragement with you, so we asked the DOC to share the best advice someone has ever given them in life that they can apply to coping with diabetes. Here are 12 tips from the community we hope will make coping with diabetes easier for you. 1. Choose How to Deal “We don’t always get to choose what happens to us, but we do get to choose how we deal with it! It’s ok to be angry and frustrated with this. But use that anger and frustration to motivate you to take care of yourself. Because the more you take care of yourself the less this disease defines you!” – Kristin Sasha Bear McConnell 2. Listen to your Body “Everyone dealing with this is different. What they do to cope may not be good for you. Listen to your body and it will help you. And remember one thing, you are not alone.” – Cecelia Montague 3. Take Care of Yourself First “Take care of yourself first, so you can take care of others and do anything you want.” – Rose Schonberger 4. Find the Diabetes Technology That Works for You “After being type I for more than 45 years, and being on the pump for 8, I can tell you that a pump is a MUST for great control as well enjoyable convenience.” – Mickey Cohen 5. Make the Most of Everyday “Check your BG regularly, eat responsibly, exercise when you can, and know your limits. There are so many variables related Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Handle The News

"You have type 2 diabetes.” It’s a tough diagnosis to hear. Once you're told, what should you do? First, take a breath. You may be surprised or even shocked, especially if your body feels the same as it always has. Some people feel scared, sad, or overwhelmed. “When I was diagnosed, it hit me like a blow to my stomach. I couldn’t believe it,” says 65-year-old Luxmi Popat, from Orlando, FL. But after you have time to think, remember this: You can live a long, healthy life with diabetes. You may need to make changes to your daily routine, but it doesn’t have to stop you from doing the things you want and need to do. “Diabetes can be controlled,” says Gregory Dodell, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System in New York. “In addition to finding ways to live a healthier life, we have amazing tools that can help avoid complications.” Get to the right mind-set with these first steps: A shift in your thinking may help you feel better and move forward. “Think of managing diabetes and improving your overall health as a tremendous challenge with a huge upside,” Dodell says. Maybe you haven’t been eating well or getting enough exercise. Maybe you need more of a work-life balance. Your diagnosis can be a wake-up call -- in a good way. “We often take our health for granted,” Dodell says. “But in the long run, it’s difficult to accomplish all we do on a daily basis if we’re not healthy.” A change in mind-set worked for Quinn Nystrom, a diabetes advocate in Baxter, MN, who has been living with the condition for 18 years. “When I learned that I was the only one that could determine the quality of my life, it changed how I looked at the world,” Nystrom says. “Diabetes didn't have to define me, I could use it to refine me Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Cope With Diabetes Burnout

7 Ways To Cope With Diabetes Burnout

I’ve been feeling burnt out about work, and so I recently forced myself to spend a weekend untethered from my phone, not checking email, and not responding to calls. The two days felt longer than normal, I didn’t miss anything important, and I emerged on Monday morning refreshed – so much so that I’m thinking of making it part of my regular routine. The experience made me wish that it were possible to do something similar with diabetes – to just take a break. But, as I complained to my husband, that’s just not possible; as we all know, there’s simply no way (without the risk of high or low blood sugar) to just take a weekend “off.” You can’t hire a babysitter for your diabetes and have a romantic dinner out. You can’t take a vacation to a tropical island and leave diabetes at home (and if you’re anything like me, diabetes and tropical drinks are a recipe for disaster to begin with). So what can you do? I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about this, especially since I am way too much of a control freak to come anywhere close to ignoring my blood sugar or rebelling against diabetes by eating a box of donuts. And, I came up with what for me might be a partial solution. It occurred to me that perhaps instead of trying to give myself space by ignoring diabetes – which would be self-destructive – I might be able to tackle my diabetes burnout from a side angle: perhaps if I could clear out some of the junk in other areas of my life, I’d have the mental space to take care of my diabetes without feeling quite so overwhelmed. Following this logic, I’m trying to find ways to be nicer to myself – to sleep late when I need to, to work in the garden instead of answering emails – in hopes that in so doing, I’ll clear out some emotional space for Continue reading >>

Coping With Diabetes

Coping With Diabetes

Coping with hypos, health emergencies, travel, driving, insulin,discrimination issues and even making decisions on when and what toeat, are all part of coping with type 2 diabetes. It is important to have a sick plan in place to help manage yourdiabetes during times of illness.Contact your doctor or diabetes educatorif:You can't eat normally - you probably still need to keep takingyour diabetes tablets or insulin, and will need advice about... If you are going a trip, whether by car, plane or train, it isessential that you plan your diabetes management for the durationof the journey.There are a number of things to consider when planning a trip,such as different airline regulations (for domestic... Become a member Multilingual diabetes resources Diabetes Queensland acknowledges the Traditional Custodians past and present on whose land we walk, we work and we live. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visitors to the Diabetes Queensland website are advised that this website may contain images and voices of deceased persons. Continue reading >>

Coping With Your Emotions

Coping With Your Emotions

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed. Here are some ways to cope: Learn to understand and accept your feelings, and live well. A diabetes diagnosis can turn your life upside down. It’s normal to feel overwhelmed. Here are some common feelings: Diabetes doesn’t go away. Sometimes I feel like I’ve had enough! After 10 years with diabetes, I just want a break. I need a vacation from diabetes!” Diabetes is demanding. I have to check my sugar and count my carbohydrates before every meal. I always need to have my meter and wear identification. I have so many doctors’ appointments, it’s ridiculous. It’s like having another job.” Diabetes is frightening. Even though I try my best to do all the things I’m supposed to do, I know there’s no guarantee. I might still have complications. That worry is always in the back of my mind.” Diabetes intrudes. So here I am at a job interview. It’s a great job at a great company. I’m trying to focus and make a good impression. Then I had a low and started sweating. It was awful.” Diabetes is frustrating. What irks me the most is that after all that work, my numbers still don’t make sense! Should I even bother?” Diabetes affects friends and family. I see his anger and frustration and I don’t know how to help him.” Diabetes is discouraging. I know what I should do, but I just can’t seem to do it. Maybe I don’t have the energy; maybe I don’t care.” Diabetes is exasperating. First it takes 20 minutes before I finally get transferred to the right person. It took another 2 months before I got an appointment with the doctor. Then all the doctor did was look at my logbook and tell me my numbers were too high. I felt lousy.” Assemble your team. Learn about your disease. Understand your feelings. Here are some Continue reading >>

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

How To Deal With The Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Common Emotional Reactions Ann Bloise was so ashamed to learn she had type 2 diabetes that she didn't tell her family for three weeks. "I thought I got diabetes because I'm so overweight," the Dallas resident says. "I really felt that it was my fault." On top of her shame, she was terrified about how diabetes would affect her vision, her feet, and her heart. She also became depressed. "I was staring mortality in the face," she says. "Here I was, 44 years old, and I hadn't done half of the things I wanted to do in life." Being diagnosed with diabetes is an emotional experience that can arouse difficult feelings. Some people deny their illness or feel outrage. Others become depressed, feel tremendous guilt and shame, or are stricken with fear about the future. "All of these are common emotional reactions," says John Zrebiec, M.S.W., CDE, associate director of mental health services at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and a member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. "Diabetes can often bring with it a normal grief reaction. But the stages and intensity will differ from person to person, depending on life experiences," he says. Healthy Ways to Deal with a New Diagnosis Zrebiec says it may take as long as a year to come to terms with diabetes. If you're in the doldrums, try not to let negative feelings interfere with taking care of your health. Here are some strategies to keep them in check: Educate Yourself: "The more you learn, the more empowered you'll feel," says Paula Wilkerson of Albany, New York, who was initially terrified by her diagnosis. "Now I know the diagnosis doesn't mean life is over. You can begin an even better life that includes taking better care of yourself and understanding your body," she says. Open Up to Family and Friends: Rather tha Continue reading >>

How You Can Cope With Type 1 Diabetes

How You Can Cope With Type 1 Diabetes

Intro Living with type 1 diabetes can be emotionally draining. It’s normal for people with type 1 diabetes to feel scared, angry, frustrated, or discouraged from time to time. But there are some simple steps that you can take to reduce stress levels and anxiety. These seven suggestions can also help you to live better with type 1 diabetes. 1. Manage your stress It can be difficult to adjust to life with diabetes. Making changes to diet and lifestyle, monitoring blood sugar, counting carbs, and remembering to take insulin and other medications are often sources of stress. As time goes on, these tasks will get easier. But everyone has days when they feel overwhelmed. Doctors call the stress, anxiety, and negative emotions related to diabetes “diabetes distress.” People who have had type 1 diabetes for a long time may develop “diabetes burnout.” This can happen when you start to feel burdened by your diabetes. Along with diabetes stress, you likely also have other sources of stress in your life, such as school or work. Getting a handle on stress can go a long way towards coping better with diabetes. Find an activity that you enjoy to manage daily stress. Some options include exercising, going for a walk, taking a long bath, or even doing the dishes. Breathing exercises can also be helpful for reducing anxiety. 2. Work with your diabetes care team Your diabetes care team often includes your diabetes doctor and nurse, general practitioner, dietician, ophthalmologist, and diabetes educator. Depending on your needs, your team may also include other specialists, such as a foot doctor, mental health professional, or heart doctor. These are the best people to ask if you have any questions about your condition. They can also give you some tips on coping with type 1 diabe Continue reading >>

Coping And Diabetes

Coping And Diabetes

"I simply cannot cope with this!" How often have you uttered just these words when you felt completely overwhelmed by all that you had to accomplish at work or at home? How often have you heard one of your clients with diabetes say, "I cannot manage diabetes in addition to everything else I do! I simply cannot cope!" Have you ever wondered exactly what that patient meant and how you might help your clients cope? There are many definitions of coping (almost as many as there are studies), but probably the most commonly used is that of Pearlin and Schooler,1 who define coping as behavior that protects people from being psychologically harmed by problematic social experiences. Coping serves a protective function that can be exercised in three ways: 1) by eliminating or modifying stressful conditions; 2) by perceptually controlling the meaning of the stressor; or 3) by keeping emotional consequences in bounds. The other commonly used definition is that of Lazarus and Folkman,2 who define it as "constantly changing cognitive and behavioral efforts to manage specific external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the resources of the person." In other words, coping allows people to use various skills to manage the difficulties they face in life. The Lazarus and Folkman framework is process-oriented, not trait-oriented, and emphasizes that the approaches people use to cope change with time, experience, and the nature of the stressor rather than people being "pre-programmed" to use the same coping behaviors regardless of the stressful experience. Further, this approach limits the problem of confounding coping with outcome and avoids equating coping with mastery. In other words, coping is the process that is used to help master a problem, but coping d Continue reading >>

10 Tips On Coping With Diabetes

10 Tips On Coping With Diabetes

Sign up for our free newsletters and special offers! Just enter your email below. Delivering you the best in inspirational articles, life stories, quotes and more. Receive a Daily Measure of God's Word and guidance straight to your inbox. Let angels be your guide with help from this inspiring and thought-provoking newsletter. Diabetes affects 26 million Americans, it's most likely that we all know someone who has diabetes, and perhaps you may be the one who has the disease. To get along with diabetes you have to manage it. Lets discover 10 steps to make the management of your diabetes easier. Diabetes affects 26 million Americans, it is likely that we all know someone who has diabetes, and perhaps you may be the one who has diabetes. Someone once shared with me You dont have to like diabetes, you just have to get along with it, and that is just what we are going to do! Follow these10 simple tips to make the managementand navigationof your diabetes easier. Continue reading >>

Coping With Emotional Issues

Coping With Emotional Issues

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: Depression is sometimes associated with diseases, including diabetes. Dealing with more than one health problem at a time can be difficult, so understanding the link between depression and diabetes is important. Living a Balanced Life with Diabetes Tip SheetsThe tip sheets from the Living a Balanced Life with Diabetes: A Toolkit Addressing Psychosocial Issues for American Indian and Alaska Native People can help you address common emotional issues among people with diabetes and their families. Continue reading >>

Coping With Diabetes Over Time

Coping With Diabetes Over Time

If a problem has no solution, it may not be a problem, but a fact – not to be solved, but to be coped with over time. –Shimon Peres When you are diagnosed with a chronic illness such as diabetes, you must face the fact that there is no cure. Despite the millions of dollars spent in research to better understand diabetes and the ongoing advances in treatment options for it, a person with diabetes has to realize that it will accompany him for the rest of his life. Among chronic diseases, diabetes is unique in the amount of time and attention it requires of the person who has it to remain healthy. It is therefore no surprise that taking care of yourself may feel difficult or challenging at times. That’s why dealing with diabetes over the long term requires developing a range of coping skills and techniques, from learning to carry out the daily tasks of diabetes control, to finding ways to deal with the emotions that having diabetes and having to care for it are bound to bring up at times. Daily care Much of what you do to keep your blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels in the near-normal range is aimed at preventing long-term complications. But it’s also about feeling good today. Keeping your blood glucose level in your target range, in particular, can help you feel more energetic and alert, enabling you to participate in and enjoy the other parts of your life. So how do you carry out the tasks of eating right, getting physical activity, monitoring your blood glucose level, and taking any prescribed medicines every day for the rest of your life without getting overwhelmed? Here are some tips: Knowledge is power. All aspects of diabetes care require a certain amount of knowledge: Meal planning requires some knowledge of nutrition; being physica Continue reading >>

Coping With Diabetes In Adults

Coping With Diabetes In Adults

Maintaining quality of life (QOL) for people with diabetes is an important challenge in diabetes treatment. Quality of life is a multi-dimensional concept representing an individual’s subjective evaluations of physical, emotional and social well-being. Specific to diabetes, quality of life refers to the impact diabetes and its treatment has on an individual’s physical and psychosocial functioning, health beliefs, and perceived well-being. People value feeling well and most individuals place high priority on maintaining and improving the way they feel; however, for people with diabetes, the rigorous demands of following a complex self-care regimen combined with the risk for developing complications may affect their health beliefs and feelings of well-being. Conditions commonly associated with diabetes such as distress, major depression and elevated depressive symptoms also negatively impact quality of life. Thus, a person’s diabetes-related quality of life is subject to change over time as their disease progresses. People with diabetes face major stressors or crises at different points during the course of their disease[1]. Individuals often struggle to cope effectively with stressors or crises[2], which may be reflected in new or existing social and emotional difficulties that further hamper individuals’ efforts to maintain self-care behaviors, glycemia and overall quality of life[3][4]. Four phases representing different stressors or crises warrant particular mention: 1) Onset of diabetes, 2) Health maintenance and prevention, 3) Onset of complications, and 4) Complications dominate(1) (see Figure 1). Treatment approaches and support by the treatment team typically differ across these phases. Often, individuals may respond to stressors in one of two ways. Indiv Continue reading >>

Living And Coping With Diabetes For 42 Years

Living And Coping With Diabetes For 42 Years

Living and Coping With Diabetes for 42 years Contributor > Michele Brown > > Published on: May 14, 2015 Living and Coping With Diabetes for 42 years What one type 1 diabetic has learned from living and coping with diabetes for 42 years. People who know me often ask, How do you stay so healthy with diabetes? Those who do not know anything about me except that I am diabetic (ie, they see my insulin pump), often say, You poor thing. No one has ever said, You are so lucky to have diabetes. Everyone automatically assumes diabetes is a horrible thing. But is it? After 42 years of living with type 1 diabetes, I would have to say, No. For me, diabetes has challenged and taught me so much. The good, the bad, and the ugly have happened and made me the person I am today. And I would not change a thing. I would like to share what I have learned so far (I am sure there is more to come): 1.Responsibility:The bottom line is, it is up to me. I must take care of myself and my diabetes. No one else is going to do it. Others may try, but it is up to me. No excuses. Chiseling out time in the day to manage my diabetes is essential. Testing my blood sugar, exercising, and eating healthy are key components to every single day. The reward is how amazingly good I feel and look (had to include that). I am able to run 12 miles a day, play with my kids, walk my dogs, work, and experience a full life. This is how it should be. I want to be an active participant in my life. At age 6, I begged my parents to send me to the Joslin Clara Barton Diabetic Summer camp. This was a 6-week overnight camp for kids. No one under age 6 was accepted. Many thought I was crazy for going, and that my parents were crazy for allowing me to go. But, I was determined to take responsibility for my diabetes. I wanted to Continue reading >>

Coping With A Diabetes Diagnosis

Coping With A Diabetes Diagnosis

Awareness that you can cope with your diabetes by taking an active part in your treatment Being diagnosed with diabetes is often a shock that turns your life upside down. It takes constant work to accept and psychologically adjust to the diagnosis. If you reject your diabetes, you can compromise your health by undermining your treatment and motivation to adopt a healthy lifestyle. As with other chronic diseases, a diabetes diagnosis means that your health is impaired, and your future health is threatened by the medium- and long-term complications associated with the disease. This sword of Damocles hanging over your head can be very stressful. Stress can impact your diabetes control due to the effect of stress hormones on blood glucose (sugar) levels or even to poor stress-management strategies or behaviours. Furthermore, you are directly responsible for the complicated, demanding and chronic treatment of your diabetes, which can require major changes to your daily habits. On one hand, you have the power to change the course of your disease; on the other, you are burdened with this enormous responsibility. Diabetes can also weaken your self-esteem, which can be compounded by the discrimination you might face at work, when you apply for insurance or a drivers license. The process of adjusting to the stress of diabetes happens in 5 stages, similar to the stages of mourning. The better you understands your diabetes and its treatment, the less fearful and accepting you will be, and the more involved in your treatment and diabetes control. Denial, refusing to even acknowledge the existence of the diabetes, its chronic nature or the necessity of treatment. No, not me! There must be some mistake. This is just a temporary rise in my blood sugar; I will get better. Awareness of Continue reading >>

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