diabetestalk.net

Controlling Diabetes Without Medication

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

8 Essential “dos” To Beat Diabetes… Without Drugs!

8 Essential “dos” To Beat Diabetes… Without Drugs!

Save Many people I talk to are very surprised to hear that it is possible to manage, and even reverse, Diabetes II without medication. I have been taught that if you are diagnosed with a disease like this, you will be bound to pharmaceuticals for the rest of your life; but when I was diagnosed and prescribed medication, I felt terrible from the side effects. So I made a choice, and opted out. Since then I have met many others who want to do the same, but don’t know how to do it. Here are 8 tips I used to beat Type II Diabetes without drugs. Note: Do not stop taking any medications without talking to your doctor first about how to do it safely! 1) When I was first diagnosed with diabetes I spent a lot of hours reading and talking to experts. I also found some really great videos, that documented other people’s journeys from sickness to health without drugs, or with limited drugs. I researched different diets and stories to the find ones that worked for others. I wish Further Food had existed back then! 2) Shift Your Perspective: Say it with me, “DRUGS ARE NOT THE ONLY WAY!!!” I am certainly not against drugs, there is a time and a place for everything, but too often they are what we turn towards first. You will have many skeptics, who will tell you that defeating diabetes without drugs cannot be done. I want to encourage you to be confident and know that thousands of people have done this. For me, drugs are a band-aid, while developing healthy habits in your food and exercise helped me to get to the root of my disease! 3) Invest in Yourself: If you’re worried about the time and effort required to make healthy changes, think of it this way: you are going to have to invest time, money, and energy into dealing with diabetes, regardless of which route you take…yo Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Without Medication

How To Reverse Diabetes Without Medication

How to Reverse Diabetes Without Medication Can you reverse diabetes? It depends on type, stage, and several other factors, many of which are totally in your control. Diabetes symptoms include things like increased hunger, increased thirst, frequent urination, slow wound healing, and blurred vision, to name a few. Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 23.1 million people in the US, and as many as 1 in 4 people dont know they have it. That doesnt count people who are prediabetic or at risk for developing diabetes. When insulin is working well, your cells get the energy you need and you dont store excess fat. A couple things can go wrong with this process, though. Read on to find out what diet and lifestyle changes can keep your blood sugar level and regulate your insulin production. Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 23.1 million people in the U.S., and as many as 1 in 4 people dont know they have it. [1] Numbers have steadily climbed over the past few decades with no signs of leveling off. Diabetes symptoms include things like increased hunger, increased thirst, frequent urination, slow wound healing, and blurred vision, to name a few. All doctors approach diabetes differently, and the management of it depends on whether your doctor focuses on prescriptions or takes a more holistic approach. Some doctors will decide whether or not you need insulin medication, and how much. Others will advise you on diet and lifestyle changes that can help. Diabetes is one of those conditions where conversations with your doctor will be much more productive if you have some information about whats going on. Read on to learn the basics about how diabetes and insulin work, and how to improve your condition whether youre at risk or if you already h Continue reading >>

10 Steps To Fight Diabetes Without Medication

10 Steps To Fight Diabetes Without Medication

Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Hypertension, gum disease, infections and stroke are some complications linked to badly controlled diabetes. Simple modification in lifestyle and some physical exercises daily can prevent pre-diabetic conditions. Here are 10 ways to prevent diabetes: 1. Beans: Consumption of beans can help regulate blood glucose and insulin levels. They can help prevent diabetes, or minimize its effects in those diagnosed with the disease. 2. Almonds and walnuts: Almonds and walnuts prevent diabetes by regulating blood glucose. According to studies, eating almonds before a meal helps regulate blood sugar levels. 3. Green tea: As per studies, green tea regulates glucose levels in the body. It reduces complications associated with diabetes, such as cataract and cardiovascular disease, and promotes weight loss. 4. Blueberries: Consuming blueberries might help reduce the risk of diabetes, with the added benefit of helping you lose belly fat. 5. Exercise: At least 30 minutes of your day should be dedicated to exercise. It could be anything from walking to swimming. Regular exercise helps in reducing insulin resistance. 6. Adequate sleep: Get at least seven hours of sleep daily. A University of Chicago study found that people who slept for less than six hours each night were at a higher risk of diabetes. 7. Fish: Eat fish once a week. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) can help improve insulin sensitivity. 8. Sunshine: Get enough of sunshine vitamin. Scientists say that the people with high levels of vitamin D are less likely to develop type II diabet Continue reading >>

Managing My Type 2 Diabetes Without Medications

Managing My Type 2 Diabetes Without Medications

If you have type 2 diabetes, you can manage it well without any drugs — without any oral medications and without insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will always have to take insulin injections, but you can likely use less than you do now. To manage diabetes well means keeping your blood sugar level down in the same range as that of people who don’t have diabetes. The way we check this level is the A1C (sometimes called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, or HbA1c). This test tells you what your average blood sugar level was during the previous two or three months by using a drop of blood about as small as that you use on your regular fingerstick tests that tells you what your level is right then. When you manage your diabetes well, it is well controlled. It is normal. We know that the normal A1C level is 6.0 or below. See “The Normal A1C Level.” An A1C level of 6.0 or below means that your diabetes is in remission. It does not mean that you have cured it. If you relax your vigilance, your A1C level will go above 6.0 again, and you will again put yourself at risk of the terrible complications of uncontrolled diabetes. You can use drugs to bring your A1C level down to normal. That’s a good thing. But this strategy does have its costs, and those costs aren’t just money out of your pocket or your checkbook. The worst of those costs are the potential side effects of the drugs. All drugs can have side effects. The systems and the organs of our bodies are so interconnected that no drug can target just one part of it without having some effect elsewhere. Sometimes we find that the side effects are helpful, but we can also find that they are harmful. Sometimes they are subtle and affect only a few people, but sometimes they are serious. All of the drugs that w Continue reading >>

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

How To Cure Diabetes Without Medication | Men's Health

If you Google type 2 diabetes, reliable sourceslike the National Institutes of Health websitewill tell you that its a chronic condition. But Newcastle University researcher Roy Taylor, M.D., begs to differ. His research finds that some people are able to reverse their diabetes by going on an ultra low-calorie diet. For Dr. Taylors new study, 30 diabetic people ate just 700 calories daily for two months. They lost 31 pounds on average. Related: THE 21-DAY METASHREDOne Guy Lost 25 Pounds In Just 6 Weeks! Twelve of those subjects blood sugar levels fell below the threshold for diabetes, 126 milligrams per deciliter, as a result. Some of their levels were completely within the normal range, Dr. Taylor says, but the average fell within pre-diabetic parameters. Afterward, the researchers gave the study participants guidance on portion size to help them return to a normal diet while maintaining their new, lower weight. Six months later, all of those people were still diabetes-free. That means that as long as they keep their weight down, they no longer need to take insulin or constantly monitor their blood sugar. Theyre no longer at risk for premature heart attacks and strokes, or diabetes complications that can damage their eyes, kidneys, and feet, says Dr. Taylor. Plus, they just feel betterpoor blood sugar regulation can zap your energy. How does a diet cure type 2 diabetes? It comes down to weight loss, he says. Diabetes is caused by a buildup of fat in your pancreas, Dr. Taylor says. The extra fat screws with your organs ability to make insulin, the hormone that controls your blood sugar. Related: Does Sugar Really Cause Diabetes? But when you lose fat, the first bit to go is the fat in your organs, says Dr. Taylor. In the first 10 to 14 kilograms [22 to 31 pounds] of wei Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

Managing Type 2 Without Meds: 3 Stories

My goal is to be as healthy as I can. If something happens and one day I'm back on medication, my goal is still to be healthy. It had been about a year since Akua Jitahadi felt like herself. But she was 51 and expected menopause to kick in soon. Plus, she and her daughter had just moved to oppressively hot Arizona. So she brushed off the tired, sluggish feeling as a side effect of being a middle-aged woman adjusting to sweltering temps. And then, overnight, her vision dimmed. Something was most definitely wrong. The verdict from her doctor: type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. "Of course, I broke down in tears," Jitahadi, now 55, says. "I wasn't ready to hear this. I always associated diabetes with 'Oh no, it's really bad.' " After Jitahadi spent a few weeks on medication, her vision cleared and she began to feel better. It didn't last long. "I hated metformin . I had all the colon and digestive issues on it," she says. "I never knew if I would be OK on it or if I'd be nauseous. I'd question whether I wanted to go out with my friends." When she asked for an alternative medication, her doctor said metformin was the best drug for the job, so Jitahadi stuck it out for a year. After that, she decided to make major lifestyle changes in hopes of quitting her medications. That proved more difficult than she had imagined. She hadn't seen a diabetes educator. The only dietitian covered by her insurer was too far away. And her doctor's sole advice was for Jitahadi to watch what she ate. "I was scared in the beginning," says Jitahadi. "It was through friends and starting to read [about diabetes] that I knew I could do this. I could get through this." Jitahadi bought books on diabetes, nutrition, the glycemic index, and diabetes-friendly meals. Instead of slightly modifying he Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

Last year during a physical, Lauren Crim of Richwood, TX, got a diagnosis she wasn’t expecting: type 2 diabetes. She had no symptoms, so the news threw her for a loop. “I was devastated,” she says. “My grandmother had diabetes, and I saw her go through major health struggles because of it.” After seeking support from loved ones -- and shedding a few tears -- Crim got to work. With help from her health care team, she changed the way she ate and started exercising. Now, a year later, she’s 22 pounds lighter, and her blood sugar is normal. “My advice to anyone else facing type 2 diabetes is to stick to a plan, stay positive, and put your health first,” she says. A diabetes diagnosis might feel overwhelming, but living well with the condition doesn’t have to be. If you’re ready to take control of your blood sugar levels and get on the path to better health, here’s how to start. “It takes a village to manage diabetes,” says Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, chair of the National Diabetes Education Program. Along with your doctor or nurse practitioner, you can get help from: Diabetes educators Dietitians or nutritionists Pharmacists Endocrinologists Podiatrists Dentists Psychologists or Therapists Their services are often covered by insurance. Having a health care team is key, but you're the most important member of it. “We want you to be informed and empowered,” Siminerio says. Take an active role in your care. Ask questions. Learn what your medications do and how to take them properly. Practice any other healthy habits your doctor recommends. And know what your A1c levels are and what they mean. “Being overweight is one of the major drivers of the epidemic of diabetes,” says Vivian Fonseca, MD, a professor of medicine and pharmacology at Tulane Uni Continue reading >>

How To Control Diabetes Without Medication - Lifestyle Changes You Can Start Today

How To Control Diabetes Without Medication - Lifestyle Changes You Can Start Today

It can be shocking and overwhelming to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Aside from the physical issues that come with the disease, diabetics have to adjust to lifestyle changes as well. The good news is that diabetics can learn how to control diabetes without medication by making these lifestyle changes. Diabetes treatment plans usually consist of four important components: A healthy, nutritious, diabetic-friendly diet. Regular exercise. Maintaining a healthy weight, or at least controlling weight gain. Medication, such as pills or insulin injections. Most people would probably prefer to avoid medication where possible. For many people, it is possible to control diabetes without resorting to medication. It takes commitment and consistency to the other three parts of the treatment plan: diet, exercise, and weight control. Controlling Diabetes through Diet Many tasty and delicious diabetic recipes and cookbooks are available to help ease one's way into dietary changes. Because the carbohydrates in foods quickly raise blood sugar levels, diabetics have to be especially careful about what they eat, how much they eat, and even when they eat. Complex carbohydrates provide a slower, steadier release of sugar, while refined carbohydrates, sweets, and processed foods tend to provide a quick release of sugar, or a blood sugar "spike" -- something that diabetics want to avoid. Ironically, a "diabetic-friendly diet" is basically a diet that's healthy for anyone: rich in fresh, whole vegetables and fruits, whole grains, and lean meats or proteins, while minimizing overly-processed or refined foods and sweets. Eating on a regular schedule also helps to control blood glucose levels. Rather than eating when you feel like it, or eating when you get around to it, a regular meal and sna Continue reading >>

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

High blood sugar occurs when your body can't effectively transport sugar from blood into cells. When left unchecked, this can lead to diabetes. One study from 2012 reported that 12–14% of US adults had type 2 diabetes, while 37–38% were classified as pre-diabetic (1). This means that 50% of all US adults have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Here are 15 easy ways to lower blood sugar levels naturally: Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the available sugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. If you have problems with blood sugar control, you should routinely check your levels. This will help you learn how you respond to different activities and keep your blood sugar levels from getting either too high or too low (2). Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming and more. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity and helps your muscles pick up sugars from the blood. This can lead to reduced blood sugar levels. Your body breaks carbs down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system (3). Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve blood sugar control (4, 5). Many studies also show that a low-carb diet helps reduce blood sugar levels and prevent blood s Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Natural Therapies

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Natural Therapies

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 11 P. 28 Experts examine whether alternative approaches can cure the disease or at least send it into remission. John couldn’t seem to quench his thirst no matter how much water he drank. With his wife’s encouragement, he scheduled an appointment with his primary care doctor. A few days later, his doctor called him back into the office and told him, “You have severe type 2 diabetes.” Like many people who receive an unexpected diabetes diagnosis, John was frightened. He started surfing the Internet and reading as much as he could about the disease. Unfortunately, the information only left him reeling with more questions than answers. To make matters worse, his doctor prescribed medication that made him hypoglycemic. John spoke to several friends who had different health problems that had been either cured or treated by a doctor of naturopathy. He decided to schedule an appointment with the same doctor. At his first visit, the naturopathic doctor told John he’d be “off medication and free of diabetes in three months.” John left the doctor’s office with instructions to eat a low-carb diet. He’d been on a low-fat diet for years because of heart problems, but while he’d cut the fat, his meals included many highly processed foods. His new diet included “a lot of salads and healthful, organic foods.” He was given several whole food supplements that he says were “simple to mix and tasted good.” After two months under the care of the naturopath, John returned to his primary care doctor to discover that his hemoglobin A1c had dropped from 8.9% to 4.9%—a nondiabetic range. For eight months and counting, he’s been off all his diabetes medication. His last A1c reading was 5.1%. With the help of his naturopath, John seem Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Under Control Without Meds For 25 Years

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Under Control Without Meds For 25 Years

When Bonny Damocles was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he asked his doctor if he could try diet and exercise before starting the recommended medications. Granted a reprieve, he immediately began the most grueling workout he could think of: running stairs. Because his export business allowed him to work from his Midland, Michigan home where he served as the primary caregiver for a son with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, he broke his workouts up into segments totaling two hours per day. He quit eating sugar and most processed foods. When he reported back to his doctor ten days later, his blood sugar had dropped from 468 to readings in the 130s and 140s. “Continue what you are doing,” his doctor told him. “These are very encouraging results.” Twenty-five years later, the 80-year-old still runs stairs and watches his diet rather than using medication to control his diabetes. His a1c tests typically range from 5.2 to 6.3 percent; his most recent result was 5.8. He reports no diabetes complications and considers himself in excellent health. But he knows he hasn’t conquered diabetes. About 3½ years after his diagnosis, after a long streak of excellent blood sugar readings, a friend suggested he was cured. Damocles believed him. “So I drastically reduced my stair-running time to practically none on some days and started eating the wrong foods for me: steaks, fried chicken, pork chops, and other high-fat foods.” Then one day, out of curiosity, he tested his blood sugar. “It was 486 mg/dl. I nearly fainted.” These days, Damocles does his stairs exercise in four 25-minute increments, primarily before meals. He knows better than to let up. “I know, as all type 2 diabetics know, that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. I will never get rid of this disease.” Too Continue reading >>

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the United States and around the world. But if you've been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot you can do to improve your health — and the best place to start is likely by making some changes to your lifestyle. “Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes. A December 2016 review in Diabetologia similarly found through 28 studies that participants who were able to achieve about 150 minutes per week of moderate activity lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with nonactive participants. If you're ready to make positive changes to help control diabetes, here's how to get started. Improve Your Diet to Help You Treat Type 2 Diabetes Naturally Keeping close tabs on your diet is a major way to help manage type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet for people with type 2 diabetes includes fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables, whole grains, beans, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free dairy. Focus on eating fruit and non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, and lettuce, and having smaller portions of starchy foods, meats, and dairy products. Be especially careful about loading Continue reading >>

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Control Or Reverse Diabetes Naturally

Can you control diabetes? Reverse it? Absolutely. We can beat diabetes. The disease process associated with diabetes (which leads to heart attacks, strokes, and other crippling illnesses) can be slowed and even partially reversed by controlling blood glucose and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce and/or properly use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas. When there are troubles with insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. A fasting glucose level below 100 is considered normal. A fasting glucose between 100 and 125 signals pre-diabetes. A fasting glucose of 126 or higher means you have diabetes. Though “silent,” at least at first, diabetes can turn into a horrible disease. It can greatly increase our risk of heart attacks, strokes, peripheral arterial disease, erectile dysfunction, blindness, diabetes neuropathy, poor wound healing, and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2. At least 90% of diabetics in America have Type 2 diabetes. Studying the evolution and lifestyle habits of humankind, we can confidently assert that Type 2 diabetes is virtually entirely preventable. Worldwide, many populations are now suffering epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes because many populations live in a “food toxic” environment and exercise little or not at all. All this suffering, all this early death, is preventable. It is the direct result of the way we live – by our sedentary habits and our Western-style diets, bereft of whole, fiber-rich foods and full of fast foods and other calorie-dense junk. Type 2 diabetes usually starts after the age of 40. But because of America’s childhood obesity epidemic, more and more of our youth are being diagnosed with the disease, including Continue reading >>

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take daily insulin injections to keep your blood glucose in a normal range. Your body produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a vital hormone that helps your body convert food into energy. Without insulin, you would die. If you have type 2 diabetes, the answer to this question is much less clear. Many people can keep their blood glucose in a healthy range without medications (either oral diabetes medications or insulin injections) if they lose weight and keep their weight down, are regularly physically active, and follow a meal plan that helps them keep portion sizes under control and helps them spread the amount of carbohydrate they eat at each meal throughout the day. Eventually, however, many people with type 2 diabetes find that despite their best efforts, weight control, exercise and diet aren't enough to keep their blood glucose in a healthy range. This is not unusual. One theory is that some people's insulin-producing cells just get tired out from having to produce more and more insulin because their cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. If your healthcare team tells you that you need to take oral diabetes medications or insulin injections to manage your blood glucose, it's important that you follow their instructions. Keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range is key to preventing long-term complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks, and other problems that poorly controlled blood glucose can cause over a period of years. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes