diabetestalk.net

Complementary And Alternative Medicine For Diabetes Mellitus An Overview Of Systematic Reviews

Prospero - My Login Details

Prospero - My Login Details

International prospective register of systematic reviews International prospective register of systematic reviews International prospective register of systematic reviews International prospective register of systematic reviews PROSPERO will not be staffed or supported over the holiday period (Friday 22nd December to Friday 5th January). During this time, we are unable to receive registrations or respond to email or telephone enquiries. You will still be able to access and search the PROSPERO website and to access and edit your records in your PROSPERO account, but not able to submit your record to the admin team. Submissions can be made from January 5th when the submit button will be re-enabled. Registering a review is quick and easy. Just follow these simple steps to register your review in PROSPERO PROSPERO includes protocol details for systematic reviews relevant to health and social care, welfare, public health, education, crime, justice, and international development, where there is a health related outcome. Systematic review protocols on PROSPERO can include any type of any study design. Reviews of reviews and reviews of methodological issues that contain at least one outcome of direct patient or clinical relevance are also accepted. Womens experiences of induction of labour: qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis A systematic review of the literature to investigate the use of preference-based measures of health-related quality of life in research involving adults who have a learning disability Complementary and alternative therapies for infantile colic: an overview of systematic reviews Low dose oral misoprostol for induction of labour A systematic review of the evidence looking at risk factors for progression from MCI to dementia in people with t Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Two Cochrane Systematic Reviews Of Complementary Treatments For Chronic Asthma: Acupuncture And Homeopathy - Sciencedirect

An Overview Of Two Cochrane Systematic Reviews Of Complementary Treatments For Chronic Asthma: Acupuncture And Homeopathy - Sciencedirect

Volume 98, Issue 8 , August 2004, Pages 687-696 An overview of two Cochrane systematic reviews of complementary treatments for chronic asthma: acupuncture and homeopathy Author links open overlay panel R.WMcCarneya Background: Acupuncture and homeopathy are commonly used complementary treatments for chronic asthma. This review summarizes two recently updated Cochrane systematic reviews that assess the safety and efficacy of homeopathy or acupuncture in individuals with chronic stable asthma. Inclusion criteria: Only randomized-controlled trials were considered for inclusion. Statistical aggregation of the data was undertaken where possible. Search strategy: Searches for both reviews were done with the assistance of the Cochrane Airways Group, and through electronic alerts. Results: Acupuncture: 11 studies with 324 participants met the inclusion criteria. Trial reporting was poor, and the trial quality was deemed inadequate to generalize the findings. There was variation in the type of active and sham acupunctures, the outcomes assessed and the time points measured. The points used in the sham arm of some studies are used for the treatment of asthma according to traditional Chinese medicine. Two studies used individualized treatment strategies, and one study used a combination strategy of formula acupuncture with the addition of individualized points. No statistically significant or clinically relevant effects were found for acupuncture compared with sham acupuncture. When data from two small studies were pooled, no difference in lung function was observed (post-treatment FEV1): standardized mean difference 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.55). Conclusion: Acupuncture: There is not enough evidence to recommend the use of acupuncture in the treatment of asthma. Fu Continue reading >>

Overview Of Systematic Reviews: Yoga As A Therapeutic Intervention For Adults With Acute And Chronic Health Conditions

Overview Of Systematic Reviews: Yoga As A Therapeutic Intervention For Adults With Acute And Chronic Health Conditions

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 945895, 18 pages Overview of Systematic Reviews: Yoga as a Therapeutic Intervention for Adults with Acute and Chronic Health Conditions Marcy C. McCall ,1 Alison Ward ,2 Nia W. Roberts ,3 and Carl Heneghan 2 1Department of Continuing Education, Kellogg College, University of Oxford, 60-62 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PN, UK 2Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, New Radcliffe House, Walton Street, Jericho OX2 6NW, UK 3Bodleian Health Care Libraries, University of Oxford, Old Road, Headington OX3 7LE, UK Received 20 December 2012; Revised 21 February 2013; Accepted 21 March 2013 Copyright 2013 Marcy C. McCall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. A. Dangerfield, Yoga wars, BBC News Magazine, 2009, . M. Taylor, What is yoga therapy? An IAYT definition, Yoga Therapy in Practice, 2012, . D. Macy, Yoga Journal Releases 2008 Yoga in America market study, Yoga Journal Magazine, 2008, . National Health Service, NHS: your health, your choices, A Guide to Yoga, 2012, . D. Moher, A. Liberati, J. Tetzlaff, D. G. Altman, and The PRISMA Group, Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement, PLOS Medicine, vol. 6, no. 6, Article ID e1000097, 2009. View at Publisher View at Google Scholar T. Field, Yoga clinical research review, Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 18, 2011. View at Publisher View at Google Scholar View at Scopus E. Ernst and M. S. Lee, How effective is yoga? A concise overview of systematic reviews, Focus on Continue reading >>

Complementary And Alternative Medicine For Patients With Cancer

Complementary And Alternative Medicine For Patients With Cancer

Complementary and alternative medicine for patients with cancer In Norway more than a third of all patients with cancer use some form of complementary or alternative therapy (CAM). By: Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Jeppesen E, Juvet LK. Complementary and alternative medicine for patients with cancer, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services. Research overview 2011. ISBN (digital): 978-82-8121-409-5, ISSN (digital): 1890-1298. Available at www.fhi.no/en In Norway more than a third of all patients with cancer use some form of complementary or alternative therapy (CAM). In order to support The Norwegian Cancer Societys work with information in this field we have identified and summarized 39 systematic reviews on the efficacy and safety of some main complementary and alternative therapies for patients with cancer. The Norwegians law from 2003 gives the following definition of alternative treatment; Alternative treatment means health-related treatment as practiced outside the health service and are not performed by licensed health care professional. Treatment that is exercised in the health service or by an authorized health care providers, however, covered by the term alternative treatment when used methods which are mainly used outside the health service. When patients use alternative therapies in addition to the treatment they receive at the hospital, it is also called complementary or integrated treatment. We searched for systematic reviews documenting efficacy and safety of complementary and/or alternative therapy (CAM) used among patients with cancer. We included systematic reviews of the following methods or therapies: Vitamins and minerals, food supplements, different types of herbs (also pharmacologically produced), acupuncture, refle Continue reading >>

Systematic Reviews Of Complementary Therapies An Annotated Bibliography. Part 2: Herbal Medicine

Systematic Reviews Of Complementary Therapies An Annotated Bibliography. Part 2: Herbal Medicine

BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Linde et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2001 Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with herbal medicine. Potentially relevant reviews were searched through the register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and bibliographies of articles and books. To be included articles had to review prospective clinical trials of herbal medicines; had to describe review methods explicitly; had to be published; and had to focus on treatment effects. Information on conditions, interventions, methods, results and conclusions was extracted using a pre-tested form and summarized descriptively. From a total of 79 potentially relevant reviews pre-selected in the screening process 58 met the inclusion criteria. Thirty of the reports reviewed ginkgo (for dementia, intermittent claudication, tinnitus, and macular degeneration), hypericum (for depression) or garlic preparations (for cardiovascular risk factors and lower limb atherosclerosis). The quality of primary studies was criticized in the majority of the reviews. Most reviews judged the available evidence as promising but definitive conclusions were rarely possible. Systematic reviews are available on a broad range of herbal preparations prescribed for defined conditions. There is very little evidence on the effectiveness of herbalism as practised by specialist herbalists who combine herbs and use unconventional diagnosis. Irritable Bowel SyndromeHerbal MedicineMacular DegenerationIntermittent ClaudicationComplementary Therapy In thi Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine Forfibromyalgia.

An Overview Of Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine Forfibromyalgia.

1. Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Jan;31(1):55-66. doi: 10.1007/s10067-011-1783-5. Epub 2011May 26. An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine forfibromyalgia. (1)Complementary Medicine, Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK. [email protected] Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain condition which is difficult to diagnose and to treat. Most individuals suffering from FM use a variety of complementary oralternative medicine (CAM) interventions to treat and manage their symptoms. The aim of this overview was to critically evaluate all systematic reviews of single CAM interventions for the treatment of FM. Five systematic reviews met theinclusion criteria, evaluating the effectiveness of homoeopathy, chiropractic,acupuncture, hydrotherapy and massage. The reviews found some evidence ofbeneficial effects arising from acupuncture, homoeopathy, hydrotherapy andmassage, whilst no evidence for therapeutic effects from chiropracticinterventions for the treatment of FM symptoms was found. The implications ofthese findings and future directions for the application of CAM in chronic painconditions, as well as for CAM research, are discussed. Continue reading >>

The Role Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine In Diabetes

The Role Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine In Diabetes

, Volume 6, Issue3 , pp 251258 | Cite as The role of complementary and alternative medicine in diabetes Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) describes a diverse group of medical and health care systems, practices, and products not currently considered to be part of conventional medicine. Inadequacies in current treatments for diabetes have led 2 to 3.6 million Americans to use CAM for diabetes treatment, despite limited studies of safety and efficacy of CAM methods. CAM is used mostly by West Indians, Africans, Indians, Latin Americans, or Asians. Prayer, acupuncture, massage, hot tub therapy, biofeedback, and yoga have been used as well as various plant remedies for treating diabetes. Several CAM practices and herbal remedies are promising for diabetes treatment, but further rigorous study is needed in order to establish safety, efficacy, and mechanism of action. In the meantime, it is important to be aware that many patients with diabetes may be using CAM and to consider potential interactions with conventional medicines being used. Herbal RemedyCurcuma LongaMomordica CharantiaTibetan MedicinePanax Quinquefolius These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM): Major domains of complementary and alternative medicine. http:/www.nccam.nih.gov. Useful overview of CAM. Google Scholar American Diabetes Association: Unproven therapies (position statement). Diabetes Care 2004, 27(suppl 1):S135. Google Scholar Eisenberg DM, Davis RB, Ettner SL, et al.: Trends in alternative medicin Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Nonpharmacological And Nonsurgical Interventions For Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Overview Of Systematic Reviews

Effectiveness Of Nonpharmacological And Nonsurgical Interventions For Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Overview Of Systematic Reviews

Effectiveness of Nonpharmacological and Nonsurgical Interventions for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews A Christie, PT, MSc, is Research Fellow, National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, PO Box 23 Vindern, 0319 Oslo, Norway Address all correspondence to Ms Christie. Search for other works by this author on: G Jamtvedt, PT, MPH, is Researcher, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway Search for other works by this author on: KT Dahm, PT, MSc, is Research Assistant, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Search for other works by this author on: RH Moe, PT, is Research Fellow, National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital Search for other works by this author on: EA Haavardsholm, MD, is Research Fellow, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital Search for other works by this author on: KB Hagen, PT, PhD, is Researcher, National Resource Centre for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Physical Therapy, Volume 87, Issue 12, 1 December 2007, Pages 16971715, Anne Christie, Gro Jamtvedt, Kristin Thuve Dahm, Rikke H Moe, Espen A Haavardsholm, Kre Birger Hagen; Effectiveness of Nonpharmacological and Nonsurgical Interventions for Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: An Overview of Systematic Reviews, Physical Therapy, Volume 87, Issue 12, 1 December 2007, Pages 16971715, Conclusions based on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials are considered to provide the highest level of evidence about the effectiveness of an intervention. This overview summarizes the available evidence from systematic reviews on the effects of nonpharmacological and nonsurgica Continue reading >>

Systematic Review Of Herbs And Dietary Supplements For Glycemic Control In Diabetes

Systematic Review Of Herbs And Dietary Supplements For Glycemic Control In Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—To conduct a systematic review of the published literature on the efficacy and safety of herbal therapies and vitamin/mineral supplements for glucose control in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We conducted an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, Cochrane Library Database, and HealthSTAR, from database inception to May 2002, in addition to performing hand searches and consulting with experts in the field. Available clinical studies published in the English language that used human participants and examined glycemic control were included. Data were extracted in a standardized manner, and two independent investigators assessed methodological quality of randomized controlled trials using the Jadad scale. RESULTS—A total of 108 trials examining 36 herbs (single or in combination) and 9 vitamin/mineral supplements, involving 4,565 patients with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 58 controlled clinical trials involving individuals with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (42 randomized and 16 nonrandomized trials). Most studies involved patients with type 2 diabetes. Heterogeneity and the small number of studies per supplement precluded formal meta-analyses. Of these 58 trials, the direction of the evidence for improved glucose control was positive in 76% (44 of 58). Very few adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSIONS—There is still insufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions about the efficacy of individual herbs and supplements for diabetes; however, they appear to be generally safe. The available data suggest that several supplements may warrant further study. The best evidence for efficacy from adequately designed randomized controlled trials (RCT Continue reading >>

Complementary And Alternative Medicines (cam) Use Among Cancer Patients: An Overview And The Decision Making

Complementary And Alternative Medicines (cam) Use Among Cancer Patients: An Overview And The Decision Making

Cancer related deaths are expected to rise to over 13.1 million in 2030 (WHO) [ 1 ]. Treatments for cancer are multidisciplinary which requires the skills of a team of experts. Conventional treatments are those that are extensively merged into the modern health care system. They are usually considered as Evidence Based Medicines (EBM) i.e. the safety and efficacy of these therapies have been well established through clinical trials. The use of CAM for health and for healing purposes has long existed in human society. In the modern era, therapies which are now used to complement or as an alternative to conventional medicines, were the only way of cure in ancient times. However, a boost in modern drug delivery options excluded CAM. The bases of many of the modern treatments for cancer originated in pre-modern society and were used for treatment and prevention. For example, Vincristine (Oncovin) was used as folk remedy for centuries until scientists revealed that this medicinal plant has a number of alkaloids, some of which are responsible for myelosuppression (decreased activity of the bone marrow [ 2 ]. In the modern era of the 21st century, many of the underdeveloped countries such as African and some of the south East Asian countries rely solely on CAM as a source of treatment [3]. Lack of health care facilities, poverty and the disease burden on the health care system forced many patients to choose CAM as their first option for treatment. At the same time cultural influences and a lack of knowledge regarding modern therapies turns many cancer patients towards CAM. In this context defining CAM is a difficult task, as what is considered as CAM in one region of the world could be part of conventional treatment in other regions. In recent years significant emphasis has b Continue reading >>

Challenges In Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine Topics Free

Challenges In Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Medicine Topics Free

Article, Author, and Disclosure Information Author, Article, and Disclosure Information Disclaimer: The authors of this article are responsible for its contents. No statement in this article should be construed as an official position of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the Office of Dietary Supplements, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Acknowledgments: The authors thank Dr. Terry Klassen for feedback on the manuscript, Di Valentine and Cony Rolon for their assistance, and Marilyn Josefsson for administrative support. Grant Support: This research was performed by the Southern California Evidence-based Practice Center based at RAND, Santa Monica, California, with assistance from the University of Alberta Evidence-based Practice Center at Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, under contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (contract 290-02-0003) and is based on work originally supported by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the Office of Dietary Supplements, both at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Shekelle was a Senior Research Associate of the Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service. Potential Financial Conflicts of Interest: Authors of this paper have received funding for Evidence-based Practice Center reports. Requests for Single Reprints: Paul G. Shekelle, MD, PhD, RAND Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401; e-mail, [email protected] . Current Author Addresses: Dr. Shekelle and Ms. Suttorp: RAND Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401. Dr. Morton: RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, PO Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, NC 2 Continue reading >>

Complementary And Alternative Medicine For The Management Of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview Of Systematic Reviews

Complementary And Alternative Medicine For The Management Of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview Of Systematic Reviews

Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews Xu Wei ,1 Shangquan Wang ,2 Jinxue Li ,1 Jinghua Gao ,3 Jie Yu ,3 Minshan Feng ,3 and Liguo Zhu 3,* 1Department of Scientific Research, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 2Department of General Orthopedics, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 1Department of Scientific Research, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 3Department of Spine, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 3Department of Spine, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 3Department of Spine, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 3Department of Spine, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 1Department of Scientific Research, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 2Department of General Orthopedics, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China 3Department of Spine, Wangjing Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Huajiadi Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100102, China Received 2014 Dec 20; Accepted 2015 Mar 3. This is an open access article distributed unde Continue reading >>

Cochrane Systematic Reviews Of Chinese Herbal Medicines: An Overview

Cochrane Systematic Reviews Of Chinese Herbal Medicines: An Overview

Cochrane Systematic Reviews of Chinese Herbal Medicines: An Overview Affiliations Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China Affiliation Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Affiliation Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Affiliation Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Affiliation Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Affiliation Research Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Cochrane Systematic Reviews of Chinese Herbal Medicines: An Overview Our study had two objectives: a) to systematically identify all existing systematic reviews of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) published in Cochrane Library; b) to assess the methodological quality of included reviews. We performed a systematic search of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR, Issue 5, 2010) to identify all reviews of CHM. A total of fifty-eight reviews were eligible for our study. Twenty-one of the included reviews had at least one Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioner as its co-author. 7 reviews didn't include any primary study, the remaining reviews (n = 51) included a median of 9 studies and 936 participants. 50% of reviews were last assessed as up-to-date prior to 2008. The questions addressed by 39 reviews were broa Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Therapies For Fibromyalgia Using Both Amstar And Robis As Quality Assessment Tools

An Overview Of Systematic Reviews Of Complementary And Alternative Therapies For Fibromyalgia Using Both Amstar And Robis As Quality Assessment Tools

An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative therapies for fibromyalgia using both AMSTAR and ROBIS as quality assessment tools Rachel Perry, Email: [email protected] . Received 2016 Dec 7; Accepted 2017 Apr 25. Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic, debilitating pain disorder. Dissatisfaction with conventional medicine can lead people with FM to turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Two previous overviews of systematic reviews of CAM for FM have been published, but they did not assessed for risk of bias in the review process. Five databases Medline, Embase, AMED (via OVID), Web of Science and Central were searched from their inception to December 2015. Reference lists were hand-searched. We had two aims: the first was to provide an up-to-date and rigorously conducted synthesis of systematic reviews of CAM literature on FM; the second was to evaluate the quality of the available systematic review evidence using two different tools: AMSTAR (Shea et al. BMC Med Res Methodol 15; 7:10, 2007) and a more recently developed tool ROBIS (Whiting et al. J Clin Epidemiol 69:225-34, 2016) specifically designed to assess risk of bias in systematic reviews. Any review that assessed one of eight CAM therapies for participants diagnosed with FM was considered Continue reading >>

Complementary And Alternative Therapies For Cancer

Complementary And Alternative Therapies For Cancer

Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Cancer Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA Barrie R. Cassileth, Ph.D., Integrative Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, H13, New York, New York 10021, USA. Telephone: 212-639-8629; Fax: 212-794-5851; e-mail: Cassileth{at}mskcc.org After completing this course, the reader will be able to: Describe the differences between complementary and alternative therapies. List common complementary and alternative therapies used by cancer patients. Know where to access reliable information. Access and take the CME test online and receive one hour of AMA PRA category 1 credit atCME.TheOncologist.com Many cancer patients use therapies promoted as literal alternatives to conventional medical care. Such alternative modalities are unproven or were studied and found worthless. These can be harmful. An even greater proportion of cancer patients uses complementary therapies along with mainstream cancer treatment. Most are helpful adjunctive approaches that control symptoms and enhance quality of life. This review describes alternative as well as complementary therapies commonly used today by cancer patients. Herbal remedies also are discussed. Evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) is reviewed, and implications for oncologists are discussed. To encourage open communication of CAM use by patients, oncologists should be knowledgeable about the most popular remedies and know where to find reliable information for themselves and for their patients. Terms applied to therapies not commonly included in mainstream medicine have repeatedly changed over time, evolving from a very negative quackery through unorthod Continue reading >>

More in diabetes