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Colour Of Diabetic Urine

How Does Diabetes Affect Urine Color?

How Does Diabetes Affect Urine Color?

Diabetes is a very complicated disease which gives rise to a host of problems which, in turn, leads to the abnormal urine color. Diabetes is known to increase the level of blood glucose in the body. Hence, most of the times when a diabetic passes urine, it smells of something rather sweet. This indicates that there is a presence of glucose in urine. Some of the reasons why diabetes can affect the urine color are as follows: Diabetes can lead to high levels of triglycerides due to the accumulation of fatty acids in the liver. This can darken the color of the urine. Besides, diabetes is known to cause several kidney related problems that can result in the urine getting a color that is not normal. Hence, if you sense the presence of sugar in your blood, you need to get it checked immediately. Continue reading >>

Why Is My Urine Bright Yellow? Causes And Treatment

Why Is My Urine Bright Yellow? Causes And Treatment

Urine color generally ranges from a pale-yellow color to deep amber. This coloring is primarily caused by the pigment urochrome, also known as urobilin. Whether your urine is diluted by water or more concentrated determines how the pigment will appear. The more water you drink, and the more hydrated you become, the lighter the pigment in your urine. The pigments and chemical compounds in the foods you eat and the medications you take also alter the color of your urine. These changes are fairly standard and typically dont last for long. Certain changes in color may be a sign of an underlying medical condition. Everyone has a different normal when it comes to the color of urine. This norm should fall on the yellow spectrum, though. The amount of water you drink influences whether the color is a pale yellow or a dark amber. People who drink more water and stay hydrated typically produce more diluted, pale urine compared to those who are dehydrated or consume less water. If the color of your urine falls outside of this yellow spectrum , you should see a doctor. This includes urine thats cloudy or brown . You should also see a doctor if your urine is red , blue, or green. The color of your urine is primarily determined by how much water youve had to drink. When you drink lots of water, your urine can become light. It may even appear to be almost clear. The less water you drink, the darker your urine will become. Diet can also be a factor. All-natural foods, such as berries and beets, and heavily processed foods can contain high amounts of food dye. This dye can interact with pigment to create a different color. B-vitamins, such as riboflavin (B-2) and cobalamin (B-12), are also known for causing fluorescent yellow-green urine . If you take supplements or multivitamins , the Continue reading >>

10 Colors That Suggest Urine Trouble

10 Colors That Suggest Urine Trouble

Share This Article: Nobody talks about urine in polite company, but it says a lot about you. Its odor, consistency and color are all tell-tale indicators of your lifestyle and well-being, ranging from what you’ve been eating and drinking lately to diseases you might not know you have. Urine is mostly water (at least 95 percent), but the remainder is a surprisingly complex brew of ingredients that include urea, chloride, sodium, potassium, creatinine and other dissolved ions, plus various inorganic and organic compounds. The most common color of urine is yellow, which is caused by the presence of urobilin, a biochemical waste product generated from the breakdown of old red blood cells. (Your body makes about 2 million new red blood cells every day, and recycles an equal number of old ones.) Here’s a handy color chart next time you’re standing around, wondering: 1. Transparent. Colorless urine may indicate over-hydration. While not as dangerous as dehydration, over-hydration can dilute essential salts, such as electrolytes, creating a problematic chemical imbalance in the blood. 2. Pale straw color. Normal, healthy, well-hydrated. 3. Transparent yellow. Normal. 4. Dark yellow. Normal, but suggestive of mild dehydration. 5. Amber or honey. Possibly dehydrated. Note: A lot of popular sites recommend drinking water to address some of the colors above, but Dena Rifkin MD, a staff nephrologist at UC San Diego Health and assistant professor of medicine, suggests prudence. “I never advise people to examine their urine color for hydration and never would recommend hydrating based on urine color. Instead, ‘drink to thirst.' The eight glasses of water per day is an urban myth as far as most physicians are concerned and the only people who should be concerned about drinkin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 2 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Many people with diabetes mellitus measure their blood sugar levels themselves. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar (glucose) level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. Measuring blood sugar levels yourself You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. Shortly after the digital display then shows your blood sugar level. You can follow these steps to measure your blood: First of all, lay out everything you need. These include: a blood glucose meter, a blood-sampling device with a fine needle (lancet), and a test strip. Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, it is less noticeable. You can get the right amount by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measurements along with the date and time, and transfer this information to a computer or smartphone. If this is not possible you could write the measurements down in a special diary. If you measure your blood sugar levels frequently, pricking yourself is less uncomfortable if you use a different finger, or a different place on your Continue reading >>

Urine Colors Chart: Meaning Of Pee Color And Smell

Urine Colors Chart: Meaning Of Pee Color And Smell

A - A + The consistency, odor, and color of your urine are often indicators of your lifestyle and health condition. Each of these signs can vary depending on what you have been eating and drinking to medical diseases. Your urine gets its yellow color from a pigment called urochrome. That color normally varies from pale yellow to deep amber, depending on the concentration of the urine. Taking certain oral medications can turn your urine anything from fluorescent green to blue, and eating carrots can give it an orange hue. Vitamins will often make your pee appear a brighter yellow color, and a disease called porphyria can cause your pee to be the color of port wine. Beets, blackberries, rhubarb, fava beans, and berries are among some of the foods notorious for affecting the color of your urine. Severe dehydration can also produce urine the color of amber. Urine Colors Chart: Meaning of Urine Color Jump To Urine Color: Pale Yellow Dark Yellow Black Blue Brown Clear Cloudy Green Orange Pink Purple Red Pale Straw, Amber or Honey Urine Color - Generally means that you are either drinking a lot of fluid, or you are taking a diuretic drug that forces the body to get rid of excess water. Darker Urine Color - Usually a sign that you're not drinking enough fluid. Your body requires a certain amount of fluid to function, so the body will hold on to fluid and the urine will become very strong and concentrated. When that happens, it will turn a darker color. Black - Causes can include nitrofurantoin, metronidazole, cascara or senna laxatives, methocarbamol, sorbitol, and the phenol derivative cresol. Intramuscular iron injections are also associated with black urine as a benign effect of the medication. Blue - The medical condition hypercalcemia (blue diaper syndrome) can cause blue Continue reading >>

Does Clear Urine Mean You’re Healthy? What Causes Clear Urine?

Does Clear Urine Mean You’re Healthy? What Causes Clear Urine?

Clear urine CAN mean you’re healthy. Typically, the healthier you are, the lighter your urine color. While you would think that clear urine would mean a well hydrated, healthy body, it may actually be a symptom of some other issues. The ideal healthy urine color is actually a straw yellow color. Clear urine that does not appear to have any color can mean that you are healthy and have a well-hydrated body, but it could also mean that you are over hydrated and risk water intoxication (water poisoning) or you may even have diabetes. So, how do you know if you are just healthy or if you have diabetes? Well, diabetes can be accompanied by increased thirst and frequent urination. So, ask yourself, are you thirsty all the time? Are you drinking more than 8 glasses of water a day, and you feel like you still need more water? If you find you’re always thirsty, not just occasionally but frequently thirsty, then take a diabetes test. Don’t mess around when it comes to diabetes. There are 2 different types of diabetes here. Do you notice an increase in the frequency of urination? Are you always thirsty even though you’re drinking a lot of water? Do you wake up a lot of night to urinate. Is your child wetting the bed a lot? Bedwetting and Nocturia (waking up to urinate often) along with a increase in urination can be symptoms of Diabetes Insipidus. Clear urine color can be a symptom of Diabetes Insipidus. Now don’t worry, this type of diabetes has nothing to do with the more commonly known and more serious sugar diabetes type I and type II. The only thing Diabetes Insipidus (sometimes called Water Diabetes) shares with Diabetes Mellitus (type one and type two sugar diabetes) is that you have an increase of thirst Clear urine color and or urination. (whichever doctor though Continue reading >>

5 Key Health Insights Your Urine Can Offer

5 Key Health Insights Your Urine Can Offer

Thinkstock Images via Getty Images Discussing bodily functions is a well-ingrained part of any physician’s vernacular. As a nephrologist, or kidney specialist, I often find myself talking about urine, because well, one of the main jobs of the kidneys is to filter wastes and toxins from our bloodstream. And all those wastes and toxins need somewhere to go once they have been removed from our systems. The result? Urine. On average, the kidneys filter 200 liters of blood each day. When the kidneys are healthy, this is quite an efficient process, so around 198 liters of blood return to the system. Usually, the kidneys are such experts at their jobs that many people don’t even think about them as they go about their regular business, eating, drinking, living and going to the bathroom (yes, that’s where the other two liters go). The kidneys’ complex filtration system is always striking a balance between keeping the minerals and chemicals your body needs to function efficiently and getting rid of the rest via the urine. I’m eager to help you get better acquainted with your kidneys, including their urine byproduct. Cue the PG-rated potty joke. I’ll leave that one and the resulting laugh it likely will elicit up to you, but it’s important to mention that no matter how you look at it — with your naked eyes, under the microscope, or (gasp!) not at all — urine contains valuable information about your health. So if you’re not already thinking about or looking at your urine, it’s time to start doing so. Don’t flush valuable health information down the toilet without first learning about 5 key health insights your urine can offer: The all clear. Literally and figuratively. The color or “concentration” of your urine can tell you whether you’re hydrated and Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Diabetes & Urination: What’s Your Urine Color Tells You?

Out of all the things in the world, and you pick up urine to write about. Is that what you’re thinking about? It may sound strange and bizarre to listen or read about urine, but boy it’s important down to every line. Urine is one thing that can offer great insight into the diabetic condition of the patient. We here would look into the correlation between diabetes and urine as part of our informative series. Perio Protect Treatment Non-surgical, Painless, Easy Method Using an FDA- Cleared Medical Device perioprotect.com Let’s head down and have a look as to how your urine says a lot about your health condition. Diabetes & Urine, A strange yet important relation It has long been practices that the urine color, consistency, and smell has been a benchmark for seeking the status of diabetes within the patient’s body. Up until the recent development of sophisticated machines that help gauge blood glucose levels, urine helped in finding the answers that one sought. But nonetheless, urine still hasn’t lost its place in today’s time of medical practices. Frequent Urination and Diabetes One of the major symptoms of diabetes is increased urination in the patient. The situation in which our body tends to urinate more than the normal is also known as polyuria. When a patient suffers from any type of diabetes, type 1 or type 2, the major symptom of the condition is the excessive passage of urine. In other words, you not only want to urinate more frequently but the volume also increases each time you urinate. In a healthy person, the volume of urine that passes is somewhere around 1-2 liters. However, in the case of diabetes, the patient passes around 3-4 liters of urine each day. Why Does Diabetes Cause Frequent Urination? We know understand the reasons as to why diabetes Continue reading >>

The Truth About Urine

The Truth About Urine

Let’s face it: Most of us don't give much thought to our pee before we flush it out of sight. But the basic details of your urine -- color, smell, and how often you go -- can give you a hint about what’s going on inside your body. Pee is your body’s liquid waste, mainly made of water, salt, and chemicals called urea and uric acid. Your kidneys make it when they filter toxins and other bad stuff from your blood. A bunch of things in your body, like medications, foods, and illnesses, can affect how yours turns out. What Color Is Your Pee? If everything is normal and healthy, the color should be a pale yellow to gold. That hue comes from a pigment your body makes called urochrome. The shade, light or dark, also changes. If it has no color at all, that may be because you’ve been drinking a lot of water or taking a drug called a diuretic, which helps your body get rid of fluid. Very dark honey- or brown-colored urine could be a sign that you’re dehydrated and need to get more fluids right away. It may also be a warning sign of liver problems, so see your doctor if it doesn’t get better after a day or so. Other unusual colors that may show up: Pink or red: Some foods like carrots, blackberries, beets, and rhubarb can turn your pee a pinkish-red color. This can also be a side effect of medications like the antibiotic rifampin or a drug for urinary tract infections (UTIs) called phenazopyridine. Always check with your doctor if your pee is pink or red. You might have blood in your urine. It doesn’t always mean there’s a problem, but it can be a sign of kidney disease, a UTI, prostate problems, or a tumor. Orange: When your pee is the color of a citrus-flavored soft drink, it’s probably because of meds like high-dose vitamin B2, the UTI drug phenazopyridine, or Continue reading >>

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Your Urine And Diabetes: What You Should Know

Paula’s story Paula came to see mcomplaining that her urine smelt funny. She had been referred to through a friend who had diabetes, and who thought that I might be able to help Paula understand why her pee smelled funny. “My friend told me my urine smells like diabetes,” said Paula. “She said she had that same fruity smell when she got diagnosed.” Paula said her urine smelled like, “Sugar Smacks,” of all things. I suspected that Paula may have Type 2 Diabetes, but we needed to run some lab tests in order to confirm this suspicion We tested her urine using a urinalysis. She had high levels of glucose in her urine. After the urinalysis, we ran a random blood sugar, which detected her levels at 798 mg/dL. With the results at hand, Paula was diagnosed with diabetes. She had to start on insulin seemingly right off the bat, as other oral medications wouldn’t control her diabetes. She had weight to lose, and goals to reach. While she’s a work in progress,her urine no longer smells like Sugar Smacks. What exactly is urine made of ? Urine is a clear, yellow liquid produced by the body to handle the wastes from normal body metabolism. When nitrogenous by-products build up in the blood from cellular metabolism, it must be cleared from the bloodstream. In our bodies, some of our toxic waste from metabolism is excreted through perspiration as urea. The rest is handled by an intricate filter system that makes up the human urinary system. The kidneys work through processes of filtering waste, reabsorption, and tubular secretion. They make urine through this complex filtration process, after which then the urine goes through the ureters, which are tubes to the bladder. Once urine reaches the bladder, it is then dispelled out of the body through a tube called the “u Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Symptoms The most common symptoms associated with diabetes insipidus (DI) are extreme thirst and excessive urination. Some patients may drink as much as a full glass of fluids every 10 to 20 minutes. As DI may start in the toddler age group, the excessive thirst and asking for fluids may be misinterpreted as “bad behavior” or habit and parents may be mistakenly told to withhold fluids to break the habit. It is important that these children are allowed open access to fluids until treatment is started. If unable to find fluids easily, some children have been known to drink directly from faucets, baths, pet dishes, swimming pools, and other unusual sources around the home. The extreme urination may continue throughout the day and the night, sometimes as often as every 15-20 minutes, and often includes bed-wetting. The urine is usually pale, without color. Symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to those of diabetes mellitus, except that the urine does not contain high sugar levels. Diabetes insipidus can interfere with appetite and eating. In children, it can interfere with growth and weight gain. Signs of dehydration often appear, since the body is unable to keep enough of the water it takes in. Symptoms of dehydration include: Dry skin Dry mucous membranes (sticky mouth) /reduced tears Sunken appearance to eyes Sunken fontanelles (soft spot in the skull) in infants Fatigue/sleepiness Weight loss Headache Irritability Low body temperature Muscle pains Rapid heart rate Low blood pressure/shock Adults with untreated DI may be able to drink enough water to make up for the extreme loss of urine. However, there is a serious risk of dehydration and imbalances in the blood, such as salt and potassium. Most patients with diabetes insipidus have an abnormal appearance Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

Type 2 Diabetes: 4 Signs Of Trouble

If your glucose levels get out of control, it can lead to serious diabetes problems. Knowing the signs of these diabetes conditions can help you take quick action to resolve them. Diabetes complications can occur if you don't regulate your blood sugar (glucose) levels properly. Blood sugar is produced in your liver and muscles, and most of the food you eat is converted into blood sugar. This is your body's source of energy, but when your blood sugar gets too high, diabetes is the result. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which then carries blood sugar into your cells, where it’s stored and used for energy. When you develop insulin resistance, high levels of sugar build up in your blood instead of your cells and you start to experience signs and symptoms of diabetes. You may notice fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, infections that are slow to heal, pain and numbness in your feet or hands, and increased urination. For awhile, your pancreas will work to keep up with your body’s sugar demand by producing more insulin, but eventually it loses the ability to compensate and serious diabetes complications — including blindness, kidney failure, loss of circulation in your lower extremities, and heart disease — can develop. For most people with diabetes, the target blood sugar level is 70 to 130 mg/dL, but your doctor will work with you to pinpoint your individual target range. Your doctor can also help you learn what to eat and how to keep your blood sugar within a healthy range. Joel Zonszein, MD, director of clinical diabetes at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, says it’s very important to work with and see your doctor regularly and to consult a diabetes educator. If your diabetes is well-controlled and you're monitoring your bloo Continue reading >>

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

What You Can Learn About Your Health By Analyzing The Color And Smell Of Your Urine

By Dr. Mercola Urine can reveal important information about your body's waste elimination process, providing clues about your overall health status. Your kidneys serve to filter excess water and water-soluble wastes out of your blood, getting rid of toxins and things that would otherwise build up and cause you to become ill. Many things — from excess protein and sugar to bacteria and yeast — may make their way into your urine. Instead of ignoring your urine and dashing back to whatever important activity having to pee interrupted, take this golden opportunity to become familiar with your "normal." If you notice changes in the way your urine looks or smells, the cause might be something as benign as what you had for dinner last night, such as beets or asparagus. Or, your astuteness may potentially alert you to a serious condition. If you suspect you have a urinary tract problem, you should consult your physician. One of the first things he or she is likely to do is a urine test. Urine tests have been around for more than 6,000 years1 and are easy, noninvasive tools for quickly assessing your health status2. Minding Your Pees and Cues In your lifetime, your kidneys filter more than one million gallons of water, enough to fill a small lake. Amazingly, one kidney can handle the task perfectly well. In fact, if you lose a kidney, your remaining kidney can increase in size by 50 percent within two months, to take over the job of both.3 Urine is 95 percent water and five percent urea, uric acid, minerals, salts, enzymes, and various substances that would cause problems if allowed to accumulate in your body4. Normal urine is clear and has a straw yellow color, caused by a bile pigment called urobilin. As with your stool, your urine changes color depending on what foods you Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

Most people have heard of the two main types of diabetes. But did you know the name has nothing to do with high blood sugar? It's a general term for any condition that causes your body to make a lot of urine. And that’s just what, diabetes insipidus does. This condition makes you extra thirsty. As a result, you pee -- a lot. Your body makes a substance called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). It’s produced in a part of your brain called the hypothalamus and stored in your pituitary gland. It tells your kidneys to hold onto water, which makes your urine more concentrated. When you’re thirsty or slightly dehydrated, ADH levels rise. Your kidneys reabsorb more water and put out concentrated urine. If you’ve had plenty to drink, ADH levels fall and what comes out is clear and dilute. When your body doesn’t make enough ADH, the condition is called central diabetes insipidus. If you make enough but your kidneys can't respond to it, you have nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In either form, the result is the same. Your kidneys can't retain water, so even if you’re dehydrated, they'll put out a lot of pale, or diluted urine. When your kidneys can’t conserve water, you’ll: Get really thirsty Pee a lot -- this is known as polyuria Some people get dehydrated. If you lose too much water, you could have: Lethargy Muscle pains Irritability If you have this condition, you’ll probably wind up at the doctor for help with your thirst and constant need for a bathroom. To diagnose you, the doctor will do a series of blood and urine tests that may take several hours. You’ll go without water the whole time, so you’ll get thirstier. Your doctor will measure the sodium in your blood and pee. He may give you an ADH substitute to see if your kidneys respond by concentrating your ur Continue reading >>

Changes In Urine Colour

Changes In Urine Colour

A change in your urine colour is normally due to something completely normal, but just occasionally it may be a sign that you should seek medical advice. Urine gets it colour from the pigment urochrome and the colour normally ranges between light yellow and dark amber. The darker the colour of the urine, the more concentrated it will be. Because people tend to sleep for several hours without having a drink, their urine is normally darker when urinating first thing in the morning. Darker urine during the day or evening can indicate dehydration, meaning you're not drinking enough fluids. Drinking lots of fluids will make urine lighter. However, taking a diuretic, a medication to get rid of excess water in the body, also makes urine turn pale, as does diabetes insipidus, a rare type of diabetes. You may notice that when eating certain foods such as beetroot the colour of your urine changes - though this doesn't happen in everyone. Taking certain medications can also make the colour of urine change. Vitamin supplements may change the urine to a particularly bright colour. These changes, which are harmless, are due to the pigments and compounds in the food, supplements or medication. How much the colour of your urine changes will depend on how much food you eat or supplements or medication you take, how hydrated you are and on your own body chemistry. Sometimes a change in urine colour is an indication of a medical problem such as a urinary tract infection, urinary tract bleeding, or kidney, bladder or liver problem. What do different urine colours indicate? The change in urine colour can indicate which food you have eaten, which medicine or supplement you took, or a medical problem. These are some of the foods that may change the colour of urine: Dark yellow or orange: carr Continue reading >>

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