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College Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

#tgw: Living With Type 1 Diabetes

#tgw: Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Ashley Askin manages her diabetes while also managing the student-athlete lifestyle By Justin Fedich | The Good Word Inspired by three Yellow Jacket student-athletes living with diabetes, on Saturday, October 15, the Georgia Tech Athletic Association will participate in the Juvenile Diabetes Walk at Centennial Olympic Park. Click HERE for more info. When Ashley Askin was a child, she couldn't help laying in her bed and crying. Askin wanted to be able to play sports, but a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes, which she was diagnosed with when she was 7 years old, made it difficult to do so at a high level. Her parents, Denise and John, who each played basketball and football, respectively, at Notre Dame, weren't going to let Askin use diabetes as an excuse to derail her from her goals. "You've got five minutes to cry, and then you've got to get up and you've got to get tough," Askin's mother Denise would say. "You can't cry about the things that you can't change." It made Askin mad when her mother told her over and over again to stop crying. "Why can't I cry," she thought. Now, she knows why crying would have done her no good. Askin, a 21-year-old outside hitter for the Georgia Tech volleyball team, has a positive outlook on life, a mindset shaped by her tough-minded parents and three siblings. She understands that unless a cure is found, she will have Type 1 diabetes for the rest of her life, and that will not change. But she won't whine or complain about it, no matter how much of a burden it is on her daily schedule. To make sure she stays as healthy as possible, Askin takes an average of six shots a day and checks her blood 10 times a day, both of which are time consuming for a student athlete schedule that already doesn't allow for much down time. Through it all, she keeps Continue reading >>

A Little Madness Over College Basketball And Diabetes

A Little Madness Over College Basketball And Diabetes

A Little Madness Over College Basketball and Diabetes Written by Mike Hoskins on March 18, 2014 The Madness of March is here, once again! It's the time of year when college basketball fever consumes the world and businesses lose countless hours of employee productivity thanks to bracketology and all forms of NCAA fan activity. I'm a sports fan myself, and while pro baseball and hockey are my first two loves, tying for a close third would be college basketball and football. Now, I've never been one to go to the extreme of memorizing stats and standings like many of my friends (hey, I'm dis tracted enough by diabetes math!) But yes, I like to keep tabs on college basketball, and when March Madness rolls around, I definitely feel the fever myself. Like so many other fans, I was glued to the TV set this past weekend during the highly-anticipated Selection Sunday when 68 teams are matched up for the first round, which begins today. Of course, as a PWD, I've kept my eye especially on a number of athletes who've succeeded in their respective sport while living with type 1. In fact, following their journey over the past decade has motivated me to start better managing my own health, and also delve more deeply into the Diabetes Community. What I'm getting at here is that I was privileged to recently have the chance for an interchange with one of those type 1 college stars by the name of Tom Gisler , who played Division III basketball for the University of Northwestern in Minnesota up until his graduation last year. Tom made a big impact in that college basketball division, becoming one of the best long-range shooters that helped lead the Northwestern Eagles to a third consecutive berth in the NCAA Division III tournament. Or, as stat-watchers may appreciate: Standing at 6'-4'', Continue reading >>

9 Tips For Student-athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

9 Tips For Student-athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

9 tips for student-athletes with type 1 diabetes Athletes and anyone who has type 1 diabetes need to be careful when they exercise to avoid hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Because exercise increases sensitivity toinsulin, risk for a low after exercise increases. However, exercise can be done safely by learning to balance insulin, food and physical activity. Here are ninetips to remember when exercising/playing a sport: Talk with your diabetes team to decide whether you should change your insulin dose when you exercise. Consider when you last took insulin and if it may be peaking during your activity as it may put you at greater risk for a low. Check your blood glucose before you exercise. If it's low, eat a snack and wait until your blood glucose comes up. For some people, even if your blood glucose isn't low, you may still need to eat a snack. If it's higher than 240, check for ketones. If ketones are present, don't exercise. Pack a bag of supplies and keep it close by. Include snacks in case of hypoglycemia as well as snacks to prevent hypoglycemia including things like glucose tablets, hard candy, juice boxes, crackers with peanut butter or cheese, a big bottle of water and your blood glucose meter and supplies. Take a short break to check your blood glucose and eat a snack if you're exercising for longer than an hour, like when playing in a soccer game. Check your blood glucose often after exercising. Remember, the effects of exercise on your blood glucose can last for up to 24 hours. Tell your teammates, coach or person you're exercising with the signs to look for in case you start to go low. Also teach them what to do to help you. Continue reading >>

Being 2-sport Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Makes Alabamas Keith Holcombe One Of A Kind

Being 2-sport Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Makes Alabamas Keith Holcombe One Of A Kind

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. They give you an orange to practice on, that part they get right on television. Not just to the child, but especially the parents, because theyre the ones who usually end up giving the injections for the first few years. He was 9 when told he had diabetes. It was a Friday, April 15, tax day, when his blood sugar was so off that he should have been convulsing. The doctor who finally figured out what was wrong told his parents to go straight to the hospital, dont even stop at home to get anything, because they could get him there faster than a dispatched ambulance. Thats a lot for someone that age to take in. Yet when it came time for his first non-administered insulin shot three days later, which his mother was going to do after practicing with the orange all weekend, Holcombe looked up at the nurse and asked Can I do it? I put a lot of the responsibility on myself because all the dreams and aspirations that I had for playing sports at the college level, and maybe going on to the professional level. At first I thought it was over. Instead, Holcombe went home from the hospital on Monday. On Tuesday night he was back playing baseball. Now hes a two-sport standout for the University of Alabama, a linebacker for the national championship football team, and an outfielder whos off to a blistering start in baseball this spring, all while wearing an insulin pump during practices and games. Its under a hip pad for the former, and attached to his back for the latter so he can slide either legs firstor headfirst. Its just something that Ive pushed myself to better myself, he said. Just keep on driving through that. Holcombes mom cried when the diagnosis happened, and he sort of freaked out, not quite knowing what it all meant. But her tears were more relief than a Continue reading >>

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

Improvements in the management of diabetes mellitus in the twentieth century have made it possible for athletes to compete in sport at a professional level. While it is rare for professional athletes to have type 2 diabetes, a number of notable athletes have type 1. Literature on the management of diabetes in competitive sports focuses on the difficulties with balancing energy and insulin intake during periods of strenuous exercise.[1] The following is a list of notable sportspeople who have had diabetes during their careers. It does not include athletes diagnosed after retirement. Water-Polo Keegan Coleman, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (2017-current) driver/attacker, type 1 American football[edit] Jay Cutler, Denver Broncos (2006–2008) and Chicago Bears (2009–2016) quarterback, type 1.[2] Mike Echols, Tennessee Titans (2002–2004) cornerback, type 1.[3] Kendall Simmons, Pittsburgh Steelers (2002–2008) guard, type 1.[4] Jake Byrne, San Diego Chargers, tight end, type 1[5] John Chick, Saskatchewan Roughriders (2007–2009, 2013–), Indianapolis Colts (2010–11), Jacksonville Jaguars (2011–2012) defensive end, type 1[6] Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals (2011–); cornerback, type 2 Mark Andrews, Oklahoma Sooners, tight end, type 1[7] Australian rules football[edit] Nathan Bassett, Adelaide, type 1.[8] Jamie Cripps, St Kilda and West Coast, type 1.[9] Jack Fitzpatrick, Melbourne, Hawthorn type 1.[10] Brandon Jack, Sydney, type 1.[11] Paddy McCartin, St Kilda, type 1.[12] Sam Reid, Western Bulldogs and Greater Western Sydney, type 1.[8] Dale Weightman, Richmond, type 1.[8] Baseball[edit] Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70). Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), Continue reading >>

Global Ambassador Scholarship Program

Global Ambassador Scholarship Program

Team Type 1 was established with the mission to instill hope and inspiration for people around the world affected by diabetes. We are Team Type 1. We fight for the RIGHT TO LIVE and for equal access to education for everyone affected by type 1 diabetes. Global access to medicine, education and empowerment for everyone affected by diabetes. Team Type 1 Foundation is the only foundation that is providing college scholarships exclusively to athletes with Type 1 diabetes. Team Type 1 is funding scholarships in order to recognize young, talented athletes with Type 1 diabetes who demonstrate an ability to balance both academic and sporting commitments, promote good health with successful management of their diabetes through exercise, and support families already burdened with additional expenses associated with diabetes care. The selection process for applications is based on the following criteria: The applicant maintains a GPA of 3.0 or better The applicant wants to use their sports as a platform to inspire The applicant attends (or will attend) an accredited NCAA and NAIA institution The applicant continues to compete in an NCAA and NAIA sport The applicant commits to being available for at least twoTeam Type 1 speaking opportunities (at diabetes camps, conferences, or other events) to raise awareness about diabetes management and to inspire people with diabetes to better manage their disease Hunter Segois originally from Madison, IN andplays footballas a first-year studentatDePauw University.Prior to his diagnosis a month before his 8th birthday, Sego remembers a period of time where he was constantly thirsty, wetting the bed and feeling sick at school. Shortly after, he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the hospital. The initial challenge he faced was fitting in wit Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

A few weeks ago, Kyle Love was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This week he lost his job over the diagnosis. That’s the black and white truth. You could explain away the situation because Kyle Love happened to have been a defensive tackle for the New England Patriots. After the diagnosis he dropped 30 pounds off his 310 pound frame, thereby causing the team to cut him with a “non-football illness designation.” In plain English, Kyle Love was fired because he has diabetes. But he’s not alone, there are dozens of athletes with diabetes, many of them legendary. This week I am off on another journey with Team Diabetes. Over the past 5 years, I have raised more than $25 000 to help people living with diabetes, and pre-diabetes. The money I raise goes to research, support programs, and awareness. Awareness is the central point of what Team Diabetes is about. As we do our fundraising, we are telling everyone about diabetes, the importance of being active, and having a healthy diet. It’s too bad I couldn’t sit down with the New England Patriots and explain to them that athletes with diabetes is not a ‘firing offence.’ Bill Belichick, and the rest of the Patriots front office, the message you are sending to kids with diabetes is terrible. Instead of keeping an athlete who could act as a role model to tens of thousands of kids, you are cutting him loose – deeming him broken and worthless. Athletes with diabetes are not broken. It’s treatable, and manageable. In fact, Kyle Love has been managing his Type 2 diagnosis and is ready to ball this fall. Shame on you, Pats. Just check out this list of athletes with diabetes who went on to huge success. **UPDATE** The moment Love was put on waivers, the Jacksonsville Jaguars picked him up. Looks like I’ve got a new f Continue reading >>

Helping A Student Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping A Student Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping a Student-Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes More than 18,000 new cases of Type 1 diabetes are diagnosed each year in people age 20 and younger. It is no secret that exercise and physical activity are important for all kids, especially for youth with diabetes. Not only do exercise and physical activity improve blood glucose control in kids with Type 1 compared to being sedentary (engaging in fewer than 30 minutes a day of activity), but they also improve blood cholesterol and blood pressure , lower body fat content, increase bone and muscle fitness, and improve well-being. Sports are a big part of our culture. Most U.S. high schools have organized team sports, and these activities can become highly competitive as early as middle school. When youth with Type 1 diabetes are athletic, it is key that parents help their children learn to plan ahead to assure they have the opportunity to be their best athletic selves. If your child is an athlete and has Type 1 diabetes, you will need to help him/her balance several factors to enable optimal performance during athletic endeavors. Whether he/she is a competitive or recreational athlete, it is important to optimize both athletic performance and blood glucose levels. Exercise often is more complicated when children are treated with insulin because muscle contractions during activity will cause muscles to take up more blood glucose, which can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) . The type of athletic activity can affect blood glucose response, as can the time and duration of exercise and the order of activities. Activities that involve aerobic, sprint, or resistance training can result in widely varying blood glucose responses. Many times, your childs insulin doses and food intake will need to be adjusted to prevent hypogl Continue reading >>

Team Type 1 Starts Scholarships For College Athletes With Diabetes

Team Type 1 Starts Scholarships For College Athletes With Diabetes

Editorial: Dont hide child autopsy reports from the public When Phil Southerland was cycling for the University of Georgia, his mother sent him $300 a month for diabetes treatment. To help current college athletes with diabetes, the founder of the first all-diabetes pro cycling team has started a foundation that will give up to seven scholarships to college athletes with diabetes. His Team Type 1 Foundation will give $5,000 to seven athletes for the 2014-15 school year. I was in the top 1 percent of people with diabetes in the world and competing in one of the most difficult sports in the world but there was no funding for athletes with diabetes, Southerland said from Copenhagen, Denmark, where his Team Type 1 had a board meeting. You can get scholarships for anything, right? Eleven toenails you get a scholarship. Ive got 11 toenails so I can vouch for that. Southerland, whose team has competed in Colorados U.S. Pro Challenge, said he hopes the scholarships will identify top college athletes with diabetes and help them become inspirations for some of the 371 million diabetics worldwide. I developed a lot of heroes around the world in cycling, Southerland said. Now what I want to do is diversify and reach more of the population and more people, sports fans around the world, with inspiration. Football player, basketball player, hockey player, whatever it might be, those guys with the right training can develop into tremendous leaders in the world of diabetes. Southerland said his foundation is raising funds for the scholarships, and a selection committee has been formed to select the seven. Were looking to start with seven but if we get 10 tremendous applications then maybe well be able to grant 10, Southerland said. Itll depend on our ability to fundraise. Applications Continue reading >>

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

As a young diabetic, one of the most challenging adjustments to make after my diagnosis was figuring out how to continue participating in the sports that I had already been playing. Fortunately, by working with my parents and doctors, I was able to continue competing in the sports I loved. With advancements in diabetes management, this is now easier than ever. At one time, a type 1 diabetic person excelling in sports would have been unthinkable. Now, however, diabetes is a small side note in the story of many excellent athletes. With the advent and integration of health informatics into diabetes care, it is easier than ever for diabetic athletes to communicate with their healthcare team and figure out routines that work for them. Through the electronic collection, storage, and continuous analysis of blood sugar data, doctors and patients are now able to make more accurate, informed, and constant adjustments to management routines. This ability is a game changer for diabetic athletes, for whom precise blood sugar control is key. Moving forward, this will only continue to improve as healthcare technology continues to embrace the incredible rise of mobile technology, and patients have even greater abilities to communicate with their doctors. These improvements do not mean that being a world-class athlete as a diabetic is simple, or easy, however. By looking at some of the greatest type 1 diabetic athletes in history, all of us can learn a great deal from both their successes and hardships. It is also important for the diabetic community to celebrate the achievements of these athletes. Jay Cutler: American Football Jay Cutler has been the most notable recent diabetic athlete. This is because Cutler was already in the NFL at the time of his diagnosis, and is already one of t Continue reading >>

Playing Competitive Sports

Playing Competitive Sports

Being active is important for people with diabetes. But for those who are driven to be athletic and want to make it to the competitive level, we have some suggestions about how you can do this in a healthy and safe way. Participating in competitive sports can have long-lasting benefits. Besides setting the foundation for a lifetime of physical activity, playing sports during high school and/or college also offers emotional and social rewards. Athletes with type 1 diabetes can compete safely, as long as they maintain good control of their blood sugar and plan for, monitor, and react to changes in blood sugar levels that can happen because of different levels of exercise intensity and duration. Look below for tips on setting up a sports care plan for practices and games. You'll also find advice on what to include and how to compete safely on the same turf as teammates and competitors who do not have diabetes. Discuss any competitive sports you may want to join with your diabetes care team, especially if you are experiencing diabetes-related health problems. While most sports are safe, some may be risky for people with type 1 diabetes who have eye, nerve, or kidney issues. According to the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA), every competitive athlete with type 1 diabetes should have a diabetes care plan for team practices and scheduled games. The NATA recommends that you and your health care team consider including the following in your diabetes sports care plan: Blood sugar guidelines, including how frequently blood sugar should be checked and what pre-exercise levels would prevent you from playing Insulin guidelines, including the type of insulin you are using, dosages, and adjustment strategies for planned activities, and insulin correction dosages for high Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re an athlete who has Type-1 diabetes, you know how important it is to keep your blood sugar under excellent control. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities – all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. There have been many athletes with diabetes who have excelled in their chosen sport (see athletes with diabetes list at bottom of page). But it isn’t without its challenges. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Recovery from an exercise session may take blood sugar levels to strange and exotic places. What’s more, around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Integrated Diabetes Services is led by one of the few certified diabetes educators who also happens to be a masters-level exercise physiologist. While not exactly a “world-class” athlete, Gary Scheiner participates and competes in a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. He served on the Board of Directors for the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association for many years (now Insulindependence), and advises athletes and exercise enthusiasts with diabetes worldwide. In 2006 he received the Julie Betshart Award for the study of exercise and diabetes by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. He continues to speak nationally and internationally for both patients and healthcare professionals on exercise, diabetes and blood sugar control. Through his personal and professional experiences, Gary has helped athletes at all levels to incorporate new techniques for controlling blood sugar and enhancing athletic performance. He and his team of Continue reading >>

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

So youre making the huge transition from high school to college congratulations! College is awesome, but whether youve been recently diagnosed or have had diabetes for years, navigating college life with T1D will require extra precautions. As in grade school, your college is legally responsible for accommodating your T1D needs, but its your responsibility to make your T1D known and to request the assistance you deserve. Contact your schools Office of Disability Services As a student with T1D, you have a right to accommodations . As soon as you make your decision, contact your colleges Office of Disability Services to see what services they offer. Many colleges require that you provide a letter from your doctor that includesyour T1D diagnosis and a request for specific accommodations. Examples of special accommodations include: On campus housing and in-room accommodations, like refrigerators for insulin and snacks Campus meal plan, including nutritional information and access to dorms with cafeterias or accessibility to those near by Early class registration to ensure optimal schedule Notification to teaching staff of your T1D status Breaks during class and exams for self-care Ability to reschedule exams in cases of hypo/hyperglycemia Changes to classroom attendance policies to accommodate the potential for sudden hypo/hyperglycemia or diabetes-related illnesses Find more information on your rights as a college student with T1D HERE . FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) gives parents certain rights with respect to their childrens education and medical records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18. If you want your parents to assist in any way with your medical care while you are at college, be sure to authorize acce Continue reading >>

National College Scholarships For People With Type 1 Diabetes

National College Scholarships For People With Type 1 Diabetes

National College Scholarships for People with Type 1 Diabetes Paying for college can be expensive. Luckily, there are a variety of scholarships open to those with Type 1 diabetes. Heres a list of national scholarships and eligibility requirements to help you get started! Up to $10,000 (renewable) to be used toward tuition, student fees, and books Successfully managing diabetes with proper medication, exercise, and diet Participation on an organized athletic team Two one-time $7,500 scholarships, eight regional awards of $3,000 Plays tennis competitively in tournaments or on a school team Money must be used for education, tennis development, or medical care Competitive athlete with T1D who attends an accredited NCAA or NAIA institution Available for at least two Team Type 1 speaking opportunities incoming freshmen with T1D, US citizens or permanent residents accredited four year university, college, technical, or trade school recognizes students who have high academic performance, are involved in the diabetes community, and who demonstrate that they are successfully managing the challenges of living with diabetes Student with disabilityenrolled in a 2 or 4 year accredited college or university in the United States of America full time High school senior or current college student Contribution to their community through service Applicant must have diabetes or have an immediate family member who has diabetes and a family member must be a current Diabetes, Incorporated member Preference given to applicants who have been past participants or volunteers at Kamp for Kids and/or Diabetes Incorporated Accepted or enrolled in an accredited college or university as an undergraduate or graduate student Be an admitted student to an accredited College or University (two or four year Continue reading >>

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