diabetestalk.net

Cold Weather And Low Blood Sugar

Seasonal Variations Of Severe Hypoglycemia In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, And Non-diabetes Mellitus

Seasonal Variations Of Severe Hypoglycemia In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, And Non-diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n = 88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P = 0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%–10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%–8.3%] in summer, P = 0.13). In the non-DM group (n = 173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P = 0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P = 0.02). In the T2DM group (n = 317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia a Continue reading >>

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways to Manage Diabetes in Cold Weather Cold weather can throw off your diabetes management. Here are eight ways winter can present a challenge, and what you can do to maintain your blood sugar control. 1. Be aware that cold environments can raise your A1C A1C levels (a measure of average glucose over the previous 23 months) often increase in cold weather. To some degree, bodies seem to do this on their own, perhaps as an evolutionary adaptation that helps raise their freezing point to survive the cold , according to Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD. Pharmacist and diabetes educator Susan B. Sloane says that higher sugars may make you feel warmer in the cold, but they are still unhealthy. Sloane says, Remember not to stay out long in extreme cold, especially if you have any cardiac issues or neuropathy. The cold weather can make blood thicker and more prone to clotting. Diabetes may reduce circulation to feet, leaving them less able to keep warm in cold weather. Winter may increase your chances of infection and nerve pain in your feet. Wear the warmest socks and well-fitting shoes or waterproof boots you can get. Pay extra attention to your foot care ; inspect your feet carefully every day and use moisturizer if the skin is drying (except between the toes). Wear warm gloves or mittens. 4. Keep your diabetes supplies at the right temperature Like extreme heat, extreme cold can affect your insulin and cause your blood glucose monitor to stop working properly. Joslin Diabetes Center advises not leaving supplies in the car in very cold weather. The same applies to insulin vials, pens, and pumps. Cool is generally OK; very cold or freezing is not . Some experts advise keeping a Thermos of warm tea in your diabetes supply case you have one of those, dont you? to keep supplies wa Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

How Is Cold Weather Affecting Your Blood Sugar?

How Is Cold Weather Affecting Your Blood Sugar?

Home / Health / How Is Cold Weather Affecting Your Blood Sugar? How Is Cold Weather Affecting Your Blood Sugar? Could a change in the weather make an impact on your blood sugar? Believe it or not, it can and it does! Cold winter weather brings special considerations for blood sugar that we simply dont have to worry about in the warm summer months. The first consideration is obvious we dont want to be outside as much when its cold! Not only is the cold air and snow uncomfortable for long periods of time, just consider the effort it takes to prepare; layers of clothing, socks, boots, scarves, jackets, hats, gloves, etc. all that trouble to do something as simple as walk the dog! Due to the elements, we tend to stay indoors far more during the winter months. This means we are negatively affecting our blood sugar levels in a few ways and arent even aware of it. Firstly, without regular physical activity, blood sugar levels will run consistently higher. Dont let the fact that the snows a-blowing turn you into a couch potato. There are several ways to get moving while indoors from jump rope to yoga, from cleaning house (yep it counts!) to simple stretches, remind yourself to do some form of activity each day. Secondly, while sitting around bored, we are far more likely to reach for something to eat to occupy ourselves and no one reaches for broccoli so dont even try that! In the winter, we crave warm, comforting foods like mashed potatoes, macaroni and cheese, soups and stews. While we can easily fall into the trap of high-carb comfort, there are simple ways to tweak your winter-time favorites into low-carb lusciousness. Almost mac-n-cheese for example, is hardly a sacrifice of flavor or comfort you still get plenty of both! Cold weather can also impede, or prevent altogethe Continue reading >>

Cold Weather And Your Blood Sugar

Cold Weather And Your Blood Sugar

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Now that winter is upon us in full force, we need to answer the question, “How will my blood sugars react to the cold?” Cold weather, in general, will cause a rise in blood sugars. This is because cold is a stress on the body, and a reaction to stress is that blood sugars can go up. 3 things to remember about cold weather and diabetes 1. Remember not to stay out long in extreme cold, especially if you have any cardiac issues or neuropathy. The cold weather can make blood thicker and more prone to clotting. 2. Higher blood sugars make you “feel” warmer in cold temperatures. This is because sugar content in the blood makes it harder to cool down or freeze. For example, some think this protected the Inuit Indian tribe, as they have a high rate of diabetes and endured extreme temperatures. I can’t quite see the protection factor in diabetes, but it is a different way to look at how our bodies evolved and changed according to the environment. 3. Protect your insulin and testing equipment from extreme cold. Keep these items indoors if possible. If your monitor won’t work, try warming it up under your arm for a few minutes. Sometimes hot tea in a thermos packed with your supplies will prevent freezing. How do you handle the cold this time of year? Leave your thoughts in the comments below. To learn more about this topic: How Weather Changes Can Affect Your Blood Sugar Don't Let Jack Frost Send Your Blood Pressure Soaring Reci Continue reading >>

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Back to Living Better Many diabetics are aware stress and illness can cause blood sugar fluctuations, but did you know changes in temperatures can affect blood sugar levels and lead to false readings? Sabrina Rene, M.D., an endocrinologist at Piedmont, explains how temperature can produce blood sugar highs and lows, and how they can affect diabetes testing supplies. Effects of warm weather on diabetics During warmer months, it is especially important for diabetics to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar to rise as the glucose in your blood becomes more concentrated. High temperatures can also cause blood vessels to dilate, which can enhance insulin absorption, potentially leading to low blood sugar. It is best for diabetics to stay indoors during the hottest part of the day and monitor blood sugar closely for changes when temperatures start to rise. Ideal storage temperature for diabetic testing supplies Extreme heat and cold can affect insulin, test strips and glucose monitors. Never leave these supplies in a car, no matter what time of year. The meter should also be stored and used in a room that remains between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Rene says it is important to store test strips in a dry, cool place. “You never want to store test strips in your bathroom. The warm, humid atmosphere can damage the strips, causing them to produce false readings,” she says. Vascular problems and temperature changes Patients with vascular problems often do not have proper blood flow, especially to their extremities, and cold weather may exacerbate slow blood flow. Diabetes test strips need a certain level of oxygen and blood flow to accurately calculate the glucose level. The lower these are, the less accurate the reading, says Dr. Rene. Raynaud’s p Continue reading >>

How Does Cold Weather Affect Diabetes?

How Does Cold Weather Affect Diabetes?

Dario doesnt just log and track glucose levels, it charts carb intake, insulin doses, exercise, moods, and more and gives you insights to help understand what may be effecting your blood glucose. The user-centric design of the Dario app allows logbooks, timelines, and charts to be easily shared with loved ones and healthcare providers. Download the Dario App today and scroll down for more information on how to get started. For questions regarding the set up and use of your Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, orders, or other technical support issues, please contact our Customer Service Center at 1-800-895-5921, Monday Friday, 9AM 5PM Eastern. For general inquiries about the Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, please fill out the form below and a representative will reach out to you. This form is not for technical support or medical advice. For technical support issues, please call our toll free number 1-800-895-5921 for assistance. If there is an urgent medical issue, please contact your physician. The fall and winter are enjoyable seasons thanks to all the holidays. But they come with cold weather, which can have a negative impact on those living with diabetes. Its that time of the year again. The trees are changing colors, days are getting shorter, and its getting colder by the day. While the fall and winter seasons do have their upsides,they are definitely a challenging time for everybody. As the days shorten, we experience less of the shining sun, which can be a real mental challenge. The lack of sunlight can be accompanied by increased levels of stress and tiredness. But autumn and winter also present those living with diabetes with real physical challenges. Excessive cold stresses and strains the body. This stress often causes the body to go into a flight-o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Weather: When Winter Knocks On Your Door

Diabetes And Cold Weather: When Winter Knocks On Your Door

The winter is here and cold days came to stay! So, there is any relationship to take into account between diabetes and cold weather? The answer is: yes! Everyone is getting ready: warm clothes out of the closet, heating on and having more of hot drinks. But what about diabetes and cold weather? Why is this an issue to be discussed? My experience says that most of the people with diabetes notice that their blood glucose control is worse during the winter. With no apparent reason, blood sugars are high even if you do the same things as before. Suddenly, what was under control is now getting out of hand. There are different theories about this but it is known that more individuals are diagnosed with diabetes on Winter months than other months. Also, winter time brings more people with diabetes to the hospitals. Both causes suggest that low temperatures induce blood sugars rise. Diabetes and cold weather: what to do about it All that said, it is very important you keep diabetes management as controlled as possible in order to prevent high blood sugars when worsening of your control. Here are the ultimate tips to survive this winter. Test your blood sugars more frequently If you know that the blood sugars are at risk to increase you must be on top of your blood sugars variabilities. Monitor the glucose levels more often to understand if the blood sugars are not in control. This allows you to make earlier decisions on what to do to prevent any drastic rise of blood sugars. Keep your testing strips, medication and meter on a dry, cool place Medications, such as insulin, can vary its characteristics if kept in higher or lower temperatures. Keep the insulin pen you are using away from a radiator or heat source. In other hand, the meters and strips can become faulty and shouldn Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Ice Age

Diabetes And The Ice Age

Did you know that more people are diagnosed with diabetes in the colder months of the year? Also, type 1 diabetes is more common in European countries than in African or South American countries. And Finland has the highest rate of type 1 diabetes in the world. What do these things have in common? Yes, it seems there's a connection between diabetes and cold weather! Would you believe that in the book Survival of the Sickest, Dr. Sharon Moalem theorizes that type 1 diabetes is actually an evolutionary adaption to the cold? By way of explanation, here's a quick history lesson: Way, way back in prehistoric days, there was a severe drop in temperature called the Younger Dryas, in which the temperature dropped violently in a matter of a few years. While many thousands of people likely froze to death, humans clearly survived. Dr. Moalem theorizes that there might be a genetic trait that helped certain humans withstand the cold. "Just because we can't survive a true deep freeze doesn't mean our bodies haven't evolved in many ways to manage the cold," Dr. Moalem says. "Not only is your body keenly aware of the danger cold poses, it's got a whole arsenal of natural defense." To get a real quick picture of how this relates to diabetes, Dr. Moalem illustrated his point with a story of ice wine, created in Germany 400 years ago. A German vintner discovered that if he used nearly-frozen grapes to make wine, the wine was incredibly sweet. How did this happen? A grape naturally does two things at the first sign of frost: first, it reduces water to prevent ice crystals from forming inside the grape (which would puncture the delicate membranes of the fruit) and second, it raises the sugar concentration of the water that remains. Why raise the sugar concentration? Because sugar is a natu Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

5 Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

Over the winter, people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes tend to have higher HbA1c levels than during the warmer summer months, as blood glucose levels can creep up as the temperature drops.1 Help control your blood glucose levels during the cold months with these 5 tips: 1. Help your immune system If people with diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) get the flu, this can weaken the immune system even if your condition is well-managed.2 People with diabetes are more at risk of potentially serious complications of flu infections such as pneumonia. High blood glucose levels, caused by infection, can increase the risk of conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State (HHS).3 The flu vaccination is offered free of charge on the NHS to people with diabetes, to help prevent contracting flu this winter. Contact your GP or healthcare team for further information. 2. Test, Test, Test Cold hands can make blood testing more difficult, but don’t let the cold put you off testing your blood glucose as required! 3. Stay hydrated Keep your fluid levels up during the winter months as being unwell and having diabetes can be made worse if you are not hydrated. Some medications mean you need to eat regularly, so try to eat a little and often. Remember, carbohydrate-based drinks, like milk or juices, may help you manage your blood sugars alongside any medication.4 4.Keep moving Just a little physical activity each day to get you a little bit out of breath, can help your body better regulate blood glucose, keeping you warm and helping your mental health. 1 Don’t be scared by the cold weather, either move your workout indoors or dress properly for an outdoor workout! Physical activity can affect your blood glucose level during and after exercise, so make sure you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Winter Hacks: 7 Tips To Staying On Track Cold Weather Season

Diabetes Winter Hacks: 7 Tips To Staying On Track Cold Weather Season

1. Keep your diabetes devices and insulin out of the cold Just like extreme heat, extreme cold can affect your insulin (insulin solutions freeze near 32 degrees Fahrenheit), and we recommend that you avoid exposing your insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor to weather below 34 degrees Fahrenheit. If you’re outside in cold weather, wear your pump close to your body and cover it with an accessory or warm clothing. Just like in heat, freezing temperatures can break down insulin and cause it lose its effectiveness. Make sure your blood glucose (BG) meter is protected in a case, and bundled up too! 2. Protect your immune system Winter is flu season, and when you’re sick, you’re probably stressed, both of which can raise BG levels. Talk to your doctor about whether or not you should be getting an annual flu shot to help protect yourself against the flu. And wash your hands often with soap and water, or keep hand sanitizer nearby, so you don’t spread germs. Just remember, hand sanitizer may have sugar alcohols so could affect your BG readings and dry out your hands, so make sure you wash them before you pull out your meter. If you do get sick, follow sick day rules provided by your healthcare team. 3. Test, don’t guess Dramatic temperature changes may affect your BG levels. As the seasons change, pay close attention to your CGM trend, because you’ll likely be experiencing different activities or schedules than other times during the year. If you notice a change in your BG levels, talk with your healthcare team about adjusting your basal rate or turning on a basal pattern accordingly to help keep your numbers where you want them. 4. Keep your hands warm Cold weather can leave you with cold hands, making testing your BG more difficult. When your hands are warme Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Blood Sugar In Cold Weather

How To Manage Your Blood Sugar In Cold Weather

More tips for managing diabetes while traveling around the world from Cazzy Magennis, of Dream Big Travel Far! Last time I wrote about managing your type 1 diabetes in the heat…but what about when we visit all those lovely cold destinations, or even managing winter at home? Here is how to manage your blood sugar in cold weather! Diabetes affects us all differently and some people find that their insulin doesn’t work as well in cold temperatures, meaning they find themselves with higher blood sugars. Scientifically this has something to do with the cold temperature limiting blood supply to your veins and thus insulin into your body. The simplest solution would be to keep yourself warm. When your body is exposed to extremely cold temperatures it can go into shock and stress mode. When your body is under stress your blood sugars can rise, therefore making you feel more ill. Take precautions when out in the cold by wearing extra layers of clothing, gloves and thermal wear. Don’t be silly and go out with your hair wet or think just because there is a bright sun shining that you’ll be okay. If it’s cold you need to prepare. Generally the higher altitude you go, the colder it gets. There are lots of different elements to contend with when hiking with diabetes because you need to adjust to the new altitude, the exercise and the cold. Make sure you keep your insulin at the correct temperature because just like insulin can die when it’s too warm, it can also die when it’s too cold. Insulin begins to freeze at around 26°F (-3 °C). When it freezes, it forms clumps and crystals. Under no circumstances can you use this insulin. I’ve actually had a few near misses when I’ve put my insulin in hostel fridges. The fridges were turned up so high that my products starte Continue reading >>

Hot Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

Hot Tips For Managing Diabetes In Cold Weather

Brrr … it’s cold out there! When you’re managing diabetes, there are a few extra things to keep in mind when the temperature drops. But don’t let the cold keep you indoors; getting fresh air every day is healthy and a great idea as you try to fit exercise into your daily routine. Blood sugars Be aware that blood sugars might not be what you expect when you are out in the cold. Some people respond to low temperatures with low blood sugars, and others will see blood sugars climb higher. The only way to know what’s happening in your body is to test frequently! Watch for trends of highs or lows in the cold, and then adjust your food and insulin accordingly. Frozen insulin Remember that insulin, like water, freezes around 32 degrees (F). That means the insulin in the pen or vial you left in the car, in the delivery left on your door step, and in the tubing of your insulin pump will freeze when temperatures are at freezing or below. Keep an eye on your insulin and make sure that it is protected from the cold. If you are outside and need to store your insulin away from your body, keep it in an insulated thermos, cooler, or specially designed storage pack to make sure that it stays above 40 degrees if possible. Insulin stored in the refrigerator can sometimes freeze, too. Keep it closer to the door of the fridge to prevent this. If you think that your insulin has frozen, throw it out and start a new vial, pen or pump reservoir. The protein in frozen insulin denatures and won’t work in the same way. Protect your electronics Electronics don’t like to be cold (or hot!). Keep your pump or CGM receiver in an inside pocket next to your body to keep it warm. For the most part, if you can keep it above approximately 40 degrees (F), your pump or CGM receiver will work. On Continue reading >>

Cold Weather And Type 1 Diabetes

Cold Weather And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Were you diagnosed during winter? Have you noticed that your CGM seems to resemble a rollercoaster when the weather gets cold? It turns out that you may not be just imagining things: climate and temperature are suspected to affect diabetes at nearly every stage, from a Type 1 diagnosis to a typical day in the life of someone who’s had the condition for years. Diagnosis of Type 1 Remember that notorious “environmental trigger” component we’ve all heard about? Factors like viruses along with genetic predisposition are important to consider in a Type 1 diagnosis. According to the NCBI, viruses may be triggering Type 1 “[…] via a direct cytolytic effect, or by triggering an autoimmune process leading gradually to β-cell destruction.” And viruses are more rampant in cold weather because they have a better chance of surviving when our immune system is slower to respond to their presence (Smithsonian). Type 1 diagnoses occur more frequently in colder places, too. According to the International Diabetes Federation, Finland and Norway lead the world in the highest rates of incidence of Type 1 in children (aged 0-14). It appears that cold weather may be putting us at a higher risk of contracting Type 1. Managing Type 1 Cold weather continues to affect after a Type 1 diagnosis and can interfere with management of the chronic illness. If you love winter activities like skiing, skating and snow-angel-making, and you just can’t wait for those first flakes to fall, make sure you’re prepared. Here are some tips on managing Type 1 when it’s chilly outside: Bring adequate snacks and water when embar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Weather

Diabetes And Cold Weather

Cold weather can be fun but can also make blood testing difficult Over the winter months people of all diabetes types tend to have higher HbA1c levels than during the warmer months. With snow, ice and frost all threatening, sugar levels can creep up whilst the temperature drops. With this in mind, we've compiled some tips to help keep your blood glucose levels under control during a cold snap. The cold weather can leave you with cold hands which can make blood testing more difficult. Don't let the cold put you off doing your tests though. Regular testing will help you to catch any highs, or lows, and keep your sugar levels under control. If your hands are cold, try warming them up on a warm mug or on a radiator with a towel or thick clothing over it, before doing your test. Even just a little physical activity each day can help your glucose levels in a number of supporting ways. A little activity each day will help with insulin sensitivity (in all types of diabetes) which can help the body to better regulate sugar levels. Particularly if you are using insulin, keep a watch of your blood sugar levels in case your insulin requirements go down. Bear in mind that activity can affect blood glucose for up to 48 hours. A little bit of exercise helps to keep you warm. We all know that whilst exercising we heat up, but the effects don't stop as soon as we stop exercising. We may feel cooler after stopping, if we've built up a sweat, but the longer term effects of exercise is to help with metabolism which can help to keep our body temperature up even hours after exercise and helps improve fitness levels . If you tend to feel cold during the winter months, a little more activity in your day could be just the thing. The saying 'healthy body, healthy mind' rings true. If you keep y Continue reading >>

More in diabetes