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Cold Fingers Diabetes

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

Diabetes Health Flashback From The First Ever Diabetes Blogger: It All Started With Tingling Fingers

About a month ago I was driving to Santa Cruz and noticed a tingling in my fingers. It got worse when I put my hands up on the steering wheel and better when I rested them on the bottom. During this two-hour drive, it was a struggle to keep my fingers from falling asleep. Soon after, I began to wake up often during the night, having to reposition my hands so they would stop tingling. My first fear was of neuropathy. I asked myself, “Is this how it starts?” Before I confronted that possibility, I wanted to rule out other things. I went to my chiropractor who thought one of my cervical neck vertebra was out of alignment. He adjusted my back and neck, but it provided no relief. Diagnosis From a Friend I finally told a friend about how, when I push down on my wrist, sparkles and fireworks seem to run up to my fingers. He said, “That sounds just like carpal tunnel syndrome.” His words hit me hard. “Don’t I have enough to deal with with diabetes?” I thought. “This can’t be happening to me.” He told me what carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) means. CTS occurs when the median nerve is compressed where it passes through a narrow tunnel of bone and ligament in the wrist. The tendons in the carpal tunnel may swell, pinching this nerve. It can be caused by a number of things, like performing repetitive motions such as typing. People with diabetes are 15 times more prone to CTS than the general population. (Journal of Hand Surgery, January 1995). CTS is most common in insulin-dependent patients and is not associated with neuropathy. I called my doctor and got an appointment for the very next morning. He strongly suspected CTS, but referred me to a neurologist for the actual diagnosis. He suggested wrist splints and vitamin B6 at 100 mg/day. Bracing Myself His nurse was Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

Medical Causes Of Cold Hands And Feet

Medical Causes Of Cold Hands And Feet

Cold hands and feet can be as simple as being where it is cold. The bodys natural temperature can also cause cold hands and feet or cold hands and feet can be a result of real medical issues. Problems with blood circulation, small blood vessels in your hands or any number of other medical mysteries can cause of hands and feet. A list of diseases that cause cold hand and feet include: If you occasionally have cold hands and feet dont be alarmed. However if persistently cold hands and feet are associated with changes in skin color or are continual you may have a problem with nerves or blood circulation. You may also be experiencing tissue damage in your hands or feet. Is this why your feet are so cold? #HealthStatus Frostbite is not a disease but a condition of being out in extreme cold weather. Damage to skin and tissues is due to freezing. Severe frostbite kills the muscles, tendons, blood vessels, and nerves. The skin shrinks and tears. A loss of feeling is a symptom and gangrene can be the result. Anemia often causes extreme pale skin fatigue, weakness and cold hands and feet. Iron deficiency anemia often goes undiagnosed until you experience Raynauds disease. If your hands and feet stay cold despite warming measures, check your iron levels. Diabetes causes different types of problems and including cold hands and feet due to circulatory problems, high blood pressure and thyroid problems. Lupus may be a contributor to cold hands and feet. Blood vessels come under attack with systemic lupus. Small blood vessels in the skin of hands and feet and prevent normal blood movements. Icy hands and feet are the result. Raynauds Disease or blood vessels in the hands and feet overacting to cold temperatures or stressful situations are a major cause of freezing hands and feet. Ray Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fingers And Numbness: Diabetes Can Cause You To Lose The Fingers

Diabetes Fingers And Numbness: Diabetes Can Cause You To Lose The Fingers

Diabetes Fingers and numbness: Diabetes can cause you to lose the fingers Published 3:54am, Sunday, February 27, 2011 Diabetes fingers tingling and going numb is a sign of nerve damage. The official word is called Diabetic neuropathy. What this means is that the tiny nerve ending in the fingers are being affected. The consequences of this is that you may have to have your finger removed. Many with Diabetes fingers have had the finger removed due to the damage to the nerves. Diabetic nerve damage is serious business that can ruin your body. It is important to recognize any pain in the fingers or tingling at the tips as a serious warning sign. Last week we spoke about diabetes feet pain and how many have had the foot removed. This is the same condition with the hands. The nerves are small in the hands and very sensitive, this is where we get our sense of touch from. Diabetes fingers are a sign of serious nerve damage. Those with tingling in the hands are experiencing the first sign that they can lose the finger if the condition is not reversed. What exactly is happening in the body and causing the tingling? The high blood sugar is a damaging force that ruins the cells and nerves of the body. You must think of blood sugar that is high as a poison in the body. It is so strong that it ruins the kidneys and heart. It is absolutely critical to remove this fast. The little tingling in the fingers is a warning sign that the nerves are losing the fight. Diabetes fingers is actually a sign the nerves are dying. The body part is killed off by the blood sugar the circulation dies. The dead fingers have to be removed. Here is our very important article on Diabetes feet that was published last week. It is important that you read both article to fully understand what diabetes does to Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Hands

Diabetes And Your Hands

Did you know that diabetes can hurt, stiffen, and even disable your shoulders, wrists, fingers, and other joints? None of these conditions is well understood. So how can you prevent them and deal with them? Of course, people without diabetes can have joint issues, but having diabetes raises your risk. All of these conditions seem to be related to thickening or stiffening of connective tissues — the ligaments and tendons that hold our bodies together. These tissues are mostly made of collagen, a protein that should have some give and flow to it, like a soft rubber ball. When collagen stiffens, joints start to hurt and don’t work as well. Here are four of the more well known diabetes-related joint conditions: Frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is a condition in which the range of motion of the shoulder joint is severely restricted. According to the American Diabetes Association, it affects 20% of people with diabetes and 5% of the general population. It usually starts with shoulder pain and inflammation and can progress to stiffness and near-complete immobility. Then it starts to resolve, and is usually gone within two years, especially with treatment. Diabetic stiff hand syndrome is a painless disorder caused by an increase in collagen in and just below the skin. It can sharply limit hand function. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a painful condition caused by pressure on the median nerve, which passes into the hand through a narrow “tunnel.” If this tunnel is squeezed by thickening of ligaments or other structures, severe pain can result. CTS is often associated with typing or other repetitive work that keep wrists in unnatural positions. Trigger finger is a condition where one or more fingers curl up and are difficult to straighten. The tendons Continue reading >>

Why Am I Cold?

Why Am I Cold?

Do you find yourself shivering when no one else is? Although you might just have a natural tendency to be cold, there are also a variety of conditions that could explain your chill. Anemia happens when your system can't make enough normal red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout your body. There are a number of different types of anemia. A tendency to feel cold is a common symptom for many of them. Other symptoms of anemia: Looking pale Irregular heartbeats Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland at the base of your neck. It helps to regulate your metabolism -- the chemical reactions that maintain the body. If this gland does not make enough thyroid hormone, or if your body cannot process that hormone effectively, you may become hypothyroid. Besides feeling cold, other symptoms of hypothyroidism include: Irregular or heavy menstrual periods If you feel cold in your hands and feet, you may have a blood vessel disorder in which blood flow to your arms and legs is restricted. Blood vessel problems include conditions such as: Clotting disorders Arteriosclerosis (narrowing of blood vessels) Raynaud's disease (spasms of narrowing arteries to the fingers and toes) Besides feeling cold, symptoms of blood vessel problems include: White or blue coloring in fingers and toes Tingling, throbbing, or numbness in your arms and legs The kidney damage that happens as a result of diabetes is known as diabetic nephropathy. One symptom of diabetic nephropathy is feeling cold all the time. Other symptoms of diabetic nephropathy include: Itchiness Loss of appetite Shortness of breath Confusion Swelling in the face, feet or hands This is a type of eating disorder. People with anorexia become dangerously thin because of an extreme worry about gaining weight. Feeling cold is one of the sympt Continue reading >>

Why Your Hands And Feet Are Always Cold And What To Do About It

Why Your Hands And Feet Are Always Cold And What To Do About It

Yes, circulation could be to blame, but there are a few other things that can cause frigid extremities. My hands and feet are constantly cold. I’ve heard people say that it’s from bad circulation, but that can’t be true, right? Actually, that’s not totally inaccurate. Your skin is kept at a comfortable temperature by your blood vessels, which distribute oxygen-rich blood throughout your body. When the mercury drops, sensory receptors in your skin alert your brain to constrict vessels. This allows smaller amounts of blood to your skin to conserve warmth in the trunk of your body, where all your organs are. RELATED: Join Health for a Weekend at Canyon Ranch Wellness Resort in April! In some people, vasoconstriction, as this process is called, can be triggered by the slightest thermometer changes. And one study found that this type of reaction is more common in women, in part due to our fluctuating levels of estrogen, a hormone that plays a big role in regulating temperature. (So you’re not imagining it—you really are more sensitive to cold than your guy!) A more severe cold sensitivity is a hallmark of Raynaud’s disease, in which extremities—usually just fingers and toes but sometimes also nose and ears—may turn white or blue and go numb. Depending on how bad your symptoms are, treatment may range from wearing extra gloves and socks to taking prescription meds that widen blood vessels. Finally, cold hands may be a symptom of other conditions, such as hypothyroidism, lupus, or diabetes, or low levels of iron or a vitamin B12 deficiency. Your doctor can perform tests and prescribe the right medication, supplements or diet changes. But if cold hands are your only complaint, try warming them by staying hydrated and increasing your activity levels (get up fro Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold Feet

Diabetes And Cold Feet

We’ve all heard of a bride or groom “getting cold feet” before walking down the aisle, but for people with diabetes, having cold feet takes on another meaning entirely. What causes cold feet? Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a form of nerve damage, is one of the most common causes of cold feet. About sixty to seventy percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy over time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is actually the cause of all kinds of symptoms, including tingling, burning, or sensitivity to touch. Your feet might seem warm to the touch, but feel cold to you. Symptoms may worsen at night. Poor circulation is another common cause of cold feet. Poor circulation makes it more challenging for your heart to pump warm blood to your extremities, keeping your feet cooler than the rest of your body. Peripheral artery disease, caused by clogged arteries in your legs, can reduce circulation and lead to cold feet. This could be a sign of something more serious, like increased risk for heart attack or stroke, but your doctor can usually detect it by checking the pulse in your legs. Certain medications, particularly those that cause blood vessels to constrict, can cause cold feet. Popular medications associated with cold feet are those to treat blood pressure, migraine headaches, and head colds. Talk to your pharmacist if you start to experience cold feet after starting a particular medication. Hypothyroidism is a condition caused by an underactive thyroid. Low levels of thyroid hormone interfere with your body’s metabolism, contributing to reduced circulation and colder feet. Other causes of cold feet Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a neurological disorder that causes funny sensations in your legs when at rest, such as creeping, crawling, aching—and, so Continue reading >>

8 Tips To Reduce Finger Prick Pain

8 Tips To Reduce Finger Prick Pain

Managing diabetes can be a pain — literally. And the more blood sugar testing you do, the more of a pain it is, confirms Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. Still, monitoring blood sugar levels is a critical component of good diabetes management — research involving more than 5,000 people with diabetes has shown that those who test blood sugar regularly have better blood sugar control than those who rely solely on diabetes medication. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to lessen the pain that comes along with that testing. So if finger pricks make you feel like a voodoo doll, here are eight strategies to try: 1. Test on the Side of Your Finger When doing diabetes blood sugar testing, resist aiming straight for all that real estate on the tip of your finger — that’s definitely painful. “When testing on your finger, use only the sides of your finger, where there’s better blood flow, and not the pad of the finger," says Hector Verastigui, RN, CDE, clinical research coordinator at the Texas Diabetes Institute in San Antonio. "Testing on the pad of the finger is more painful.” 2. Warm Up Your Hands Testing when your hands are cold can be more painful than when they're warmer. To heat up your fingers, just sit on them briefly, rub them together, or give them a good scrub using warm water and soap. “This will get the blood flow going,” says Verastigui. When getting that all-important drop of blood is less painful, managing diabetes is easier. 3. Adjust the Lancet Depth If blood sugar testing is always painful for you, it’s possible that your lancet is set to hit too hard or too deep. Part of managing diabetes includes adjusting the depth and force of the lancet properly. If you’re having trouble figuri Continue reading >>

Really Cold Hands | Diabetic Connect

Really Cold Hands | Diabetic Connect

Recently I've been noticing that my hands in particular have started to get really cold, more than before I was diagnosed. Is it because of poor circulation? It's weird though 'cause my feet are fine most of the time, but even when I'm wearing insulated gloves, my hands still get numb and start to hurt. I'm wearing boots and my feet feel fine, it's just my hands that really bother me. It is really cold outside, but even in cold weather my hands never got this cold before. I suggest you get some peripheral vascular ultrasound testing done. Insurance covers it for diabetics. i suggest you go to your health food store and ask for a product that aids better circulation. there are very simple and safe herbs that you can take that will clear up your cold hands for you. good luck! Denise Hi Vanessa! I'm 21, type1 and also have the same problems but it also affects my feet. It could be down to circulation but recently I've been diagnosed with Raynaud's syndrome - if you google you'll get more info, but it's common to develop Raynaud's if you already suffer from auto-immune disease James is correct the body regulates itself through hands, head and feet. This is why it is best to wear hats and gloves in cold weather. If your fingers are tingling, you should have a doctor check that out. Neurpathy in your hands can cause pain and sometimes numbness. If you live where the weather is extremely cold like now, your fingers could become frostbitten. During the winter my fingers turn blue. I have had this problem long before I was diagnosed. The doctor told me the name and I cannot think of it. It also happens in the summer if I am in air conditioning that is way too cold. I have ski gloves, insulated gloves and mittens. I usually wear a pair of gloves and mittens over them. You can al Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Why a Short List Is Not Enough Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of using insulin, and it can also occur in people who take pills that cause the pancreas to release more insulin. Pills that have this effect include the oral drugs chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, and Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), glimepiride (Amaryl), combination drugs that contain glyburide, glipizide, or glimepiride (such as Glucovance, Metaglip, Avandaryl, and Duetact), repaglinide (Prandin), combination drugs that contain repaglinide (Prandimet), and nateglinide (Starlix). It is therefore important that anyone who uses one of these drugs know what causes hypoglycemia, how to prevent it, how to recognize it, and how to treat it. Often, however, the most education a person receives on the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is a handout listing its 10 most common symptoms. This is particularly true for adults. But, as any longtime user of insulin will tell you, such a list does not go far enough in describing how those common symptoms can feel, and it misses some important, albeit not-so-common, symptoms of hypoglycemia. This article attempts to fill in some of the blanks by describing what those common symptoms really feel like — in a variety of situations, including driving and sleeping — and by describing some less common symptoms. Once you (and your friends, coworkers, and family members) are better equipped to recognize hypoglycemia, you will be able treat low blood glucose faster and avert more severe hypoglycemia and its sometimes serious consequences. What is hypoglycemia Low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many Continue reading >>

Cold Feet And Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Cold Feet And Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Cold sensations to the feet can come from poor circulation, disorders of the nervous system, cold exposure injuries such as frostbite, and decreased metabolism from a low thyroid condition (hypothyroidism or underactive thyroid). Depending upon the cause of the symptoms, coldness in the feet can be accompanied by other symptoms, including pain, numbness, changes in skin color, or a pins and needles tingling sensation. Other diseases that can cause cold feet symptoms include diabetes, arteriosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, and neuropathy of any cause. In people with diabetes mellitus, chronic abnormally elevated blood and urine sugar, causes narrowing of arteries and capillaries that impair blood supply to tissues leading to cold feet symptoms. Arteriosclerosis and peripheral vascular disease result from chronic elevation of blood cholesterol levels that leads to blood vessel narrowing. Raynaud's phenomenon features narrowing of tiny blood vessels as a reaction to nerve sensitivity to cold exposure, which causes cold feet symptoms. Frostbite causes permanent damage to blood vessels that are injured from freezing of tissues. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Pictures, Images, Illustrations & Quizzes Continue reading >>

Cold Hands And Frigid Digits

Cold Hands And Frigid Digits

Sign up now for free health tips and medical news. What cold hands may mean, and what to do about it When snowflakes swirl and Chicago's wind chills to the bone, warm woolen mittens may top your list of favorite things. But when the mitts come off and you're still offering a cold handshake, you might wonder what's wrong — and what you can do about it. Many people just have naturally cold hands, according to Winston Sequeira, MD, a rheumatologist at Rush. In fact, he says, up to 15 percent of women report having them. Only rarely do those frosty fingers signal a problem. "People can have cold hands for a variety of reasons," says Sequeira. "Most commonly the underlying cause is vascular — that is, relating to blood vessels." Whatever the cause, when blood flow to the hands is diminished, a cold feeling sets in. To help people know when to consult a doctor, Sequeira offers hard facts about what causes cold hands. Out in the cold "When we go out in the cold weather, our blood vessels spasm to prevent heat loss from the body," says Sequeira. "In some individuals, this spasm occurs when they are exposed to cool temperatures that wouldn't bother most people — sometimes just an air-conditioned room — and their fingers turn white, then blue, then red. This is called Raynaud's phenomenon." Causes of Raynaud's range from vascular damage to lupus, and doctors at Rush may offer several treatment options. For mild cases — when fingers turn white or blue but aren't painful — they might first recommend wearing gloves, as well as quitting smoking, since smoking may aggravate Raynaud's. It is also important to avoid drugs that can cause spasm of the blood vessels, such as decongestants and diet pills. If those measures don't work or symptoms worsen, medication may be an opti Continue reading >>

Cold Hands

Cold Hands

Having cold hands even when you're not in a cold environment is common. Often, having cold hands is a part of your body's natural response to regulate your body temperature and shouldn't be cause for concern. But if you have persistently cold hands, particularly if accompanied by color changes, it could be a warning sign. For example, having cold hands could mean you have a problem with the nerves or blood circulation or a problem with tissue damage in your hands or fingers. If you are outside in extreme cold weather and you have cold hands, you should watch for warning signs of frostbite. Other signs and symptoms to watch for when you have cold hands include: Cold feet or toes Changes to the color of the skin on your hands, such as blue or white skin Numbness or tingling Open sores or blisters Tightened or hardened skin Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

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