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How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a massive health problem worldwide. About 29 million people, or 9% of all US adults, had type 2 diabetes in the year 2012 (1). Interestingly, long-term studies have linked coffee drinking with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes (2, 3). Yet, oddly enough, many short-term studies have shown that coffee and caffeine can raise blood sugar and insulin levels (4, 5, 6). Why this happens is not fully known, but there are several theories. This article examines the short-term and long-term effects of coffee on blood sugar and diabetes. The health benefits of drinking coffee are well-documented. In observational studies, coffee is linked to reduced blood sugar and insulin levels, which are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes (7). Furthermore, consuming regular or decaf coffee on a regular basis is linked to a 23–50% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes (3, 8, 9, 10, 11). Studies have also shown that each daily cup of coffee you consume may reduce this risk by 4–8% (3, 8). Additionally, people who drink 4–6 cups of coffee each day have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than people who drink less than 2 cups each day (12). Regular coffee drinking has been linked to a 23–50% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Each daily cup is linked to a 4-8% lower risk. A major paradox exists between the long-term and short-term effects of coffee. Short-term studies have linked caffeine and coffee consumption with increased blood sugar levels and insulin resistance (13). A recent study showed that a single serving of coffee, containing 100 mg of caffeine, can negatively affect blood sugar control in healthy but overweight men (14). Other short-term studies -- both in healthy individuals and in type 2 diabetics -- show that consuming caffeinated coffee impaired blood sug Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Cause Blood Sugar Changes?

Does Caffeine Cause Blood Sugar Changes?

The first thing I did after reading the new study that caffeine can increase our blood glucose level was to switch to drinking green tea. The second thing I did was to switch again — this time to decaffeinated green tea. I overreacted. Several years ago I had switched from coffee to Darjeeling tea, which has about half the caffeine per cup. While green tea has even less, I don’t like it much and only drink it rarely. I disliked the decaffeinated green tea so much that I threw out the package after taking the first sip. Now, I’m almost entirely back to Darjeeling tea. People call it a black tea, although it is light-colored and is technically more oolong than black and is therefore lower in caffeine than true black teas. While I control my blood glucose level, I’m not a purist. I have to enjoy everything that I eat or drink. While my diet includes no starch, sugar (no sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup), salt, or alcohol, except occassionally when I eat out, I don’t miss any part of this standard American, or SAD, diet. My recent A1C result was 5.3 percent. Caffeine may well raise my blood glucose level. But after carefully reading the new study, I doubt it. The new study is a review in the April 7 issue of the Journal of Caffeine Research by James D. Lane, associate research professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Lane sent me the full-text of the study, which is now free online. Dr. Lane reviewed 17 studies that showed that caffeine increased insulin resistance or impaired glucose tolerance of people who don’t have diabetes. Using accepted study design — double-blind and placebo-controlled — and moderate doses of caffeine equivalent to two or three cups of brewed coffee, these studies con Continue reading >>

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Caffeine Blocks Insulin A survey reported in JAMA showed that drinking coffee reduces risk for developing type II diabetes, but other studies suggest that once you have diabetes, drinking coffee may be unwise. A report from the Netherlands showed that caffeine in coffee raises blood sugar levels. Diabetics suffer blindness, deafness, heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, burning foot syndrome and many other serious side effects, and all are caused by a high-rise in blood sugar after meals. Anything that raises blood sugar levels too high increases cell damage in diabetics. This study shows that caffeine raises blood sugar levels by causing the body to put out large amounts of adrenalin that makes cells less responsive to insulin. When caffeine was removed from the coffee, blood sugar levels did not rise higher than normal. On the basis of this study, diabetics should drink decaffeinated coffee, rather than one with caffeine, in addition to severely restricting sugar-added foods, bakery products, pastas, fruit juices and they should eat root vegetables and fruits only with meals. Canadian researchers writing in Diabetes Care showed that caffeine significantly reduced insulin sensitivity. In another study in the same journal, scientists from Duke University Medical Center reported that drinking coffee could upset a diabetic’s ability to metabolize sugar. Blood sugar levels are supposed to rise after you eat. To keep your blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas releases insulin. The researchers found that taking caffeine causes blood sugar and insulin levels to rise even higher after meals. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once sugar is stuck on a cell membrane, it cannot be released and is converted to a poison called sorbitol Continue reading >>

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Confused about coffee and diabetes? Not sure if your morning coffee is giving you diabetes or preventing it? I’m not surprised. Historically coffee has been deplored as an unhealthy vice. But recently there’ve been some big claims the other side of the spectrum… So should you believe the hype? Can coffee actually play a role in preventing diabetes? In the last ten or so years, there have been many studies (like this and this) looking into the relationship between coffee and diabetes. Most have found the same link: coffee drinking is associated with lower incidence of diabetes! A recent review, which was conducted in 2013, looked at 28 studies, with over one million people – and found strong support for this link. The evidence appears to be consistent across various ethnicities and showed a dose-response relationship, that is, the more coffee people drank, the lower their relative risk of developing diabetes. One study even showed those who decreased their coffee consumption increased their risk of diabetes, while those who increased consumption, decreased their risk! Even though this is a lot of people and many studies, it’s important to note, these were epidemiological studies. So it’s just observational evidence. Epidemi.. What? Epidemiological evidence means that people have conducted studies of large populations of people and found a pattern – or association – between people and a disease. The pattern seen in diabetes is that those who drink coffee seem to have less diabetes. “One Triple Shot Latte to go”? Before you go out and over-caffeinate yourself, let’s break this down. Firstly, what these studies show is just an association, not a cause. That is, not drinking coffee will not cause you to get diabetes, and drinking coffee will not prevent Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

In a nutshell, the answer is: yes. But for some, the answer can be: no. For most, explains Gary Scheiner, CDE and author of “Think Like a Pancreas” and “Until There is a Cure,” caffeine does tend to raise blood sugar levels in people with diabetes approximately 1 hour after consuming it. Meanwhile, some people with diabetes seem to have no reaction at all, even to large servings of caffeine. “It does this,” explains Scheiner, “by promoting the breakdown of fat (rather than sugar) for energy and stimulating the liver’s breakdown of glycogen.” Glycogen is a form of stored energy (glucose) in the liver. But Scheiner emphasizes that small amounts of caffeine probably have little to no impact on blood sugar levels. Just how much caffeine are you getting in your favorite beverages or snacks? “Think Like a Pancreas” shares a thorough list of some common caffeine-containing foods: Jolt energy drink: 280 mg Stay-away pills: 100-200 mg Monster energy drink: 160 mg 5-Hour energy drink: 138 mg 8 oz Brewed coffee: 100-120 mg Espresso/Latte: 100 mg Red Bull: 80 mg 8 oz Instant Coffee: 60-80 mg Tea: 30-50 mg Soda: 30-45 mg Chocolate bar: 20-30 mg But this doesn’t mean you have to accept those high blood sugars as a regular part of your morning coffee! Instead, Scheiner shares this advice on page 187 on “Think Like a Pancreas:” If you suspect that caffeine may be causing your blood sugar to rise, either look for a lower-caffeine substitute or take a little extra rapid-acting insulin when consuming high-caffeine foods/beverages. To determine the amount of insulin you need, test your blood sugar and then consume the caffeinated item with no other food (bolus only for the carbs in the caffeinated item). Check your blod sugar again in three hours and then divide Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

What’s the story with Coffee and Diabetes, you ask. In recent times, coffee has been widely touted for it presumed health benefits, which includes improved insulin sensitivity. This means that the body is a lot more responsive to both any injected and naturally produced insulin. Many studies on this popular beverage have simply compared people who don’t drink coffee to active coffee drinkers. The challenge with this approach is that certain factors- such as having money or generally healthy lifestyle- could influence both a person’s health and how much coffee they consume. Furthermore, it is important to note that not all evidence point to coffee having a positive effect on insulin sensitivity- most especially when obesity and other health issues enter the frame. So a recent research conducted in India may be reassuring to folks with diabetes who drink coffee. Coffee and Diabetes – What the Research Shows The study, published last month in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science, looked at 200 individuals without diabetes and 90 people with Type II diabetes who are on oral diabetes drugs. A large percentage of participants in both groups- 48 in the group with diabetes and 143 in the group without diabetes- were already regular coffee consumers. The coffee consumers were instructed to drink about 4 cups of coffee each day, and all the individuals in the group were followed for 16 years. At the end of the research period, the researchers discovered that fasting blood glucose levels were lower in coffee consumers compared with nondrinkers, within both groups. But as observed in a Medical Daily article on the research, the effect was more pronounced in participants with diabetes. While coffee-consuming participants without diabetes had an av Continue reading >>

Caffeinated Coffee Consumption Impairs Blood Glucose Homeostasis In Response To High And Low Glycemic Index Meals In Healthy Men 1,2,3

Caffeinated Coffee Consumption Impairs Blood Glucose Homeostasis In Response To High And Low Glycemic Index Meals In Healthy Men 1,2,3

Abstract Background: The ingestion of caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) and a 75-g oral glucose load has been shown to elicit an acute insulin–insensitive environment in healthy and obese individuals and in those with type 2 diabetes. Objective: In this study we investigated whether a similar impairment in blood glucose management exists when coffee and foods typical of a Western diet were used in a similar protocol. Design: Ten healthy men underwent 4 trials in a randomized order. They ingested caffeinated (5 mg/kg) coffee (CC) or the same volume of decaffeinated coffee (DC) followed 1 h later by either a high or low glycemic index (GI) cereal (providing 75 g of carbohydrate) mixed meal tolerance test. Results: CC with the high GI meal resulted in 147%, 29%, and 40% greater areas under the curve for glucose (P < 0.001), insulin (NS), and C-peptide (P < 0.001), respectively, compared with the values for DC. Similarly, with the low GI treatment, CC elicited 216%, 44%, and 36% greater areas under the curve for glucose (P < 0.001), insulin (P < 0.01), and C-peptide (P < 0.01), respectively. Insulin sensitivity was significantly reduced (40%) with the high GI treatment after CC was ingested compared with DC; with the low GI treatment, CC ingestion resulted in a 29% decrease in insulin sensitivity, although this difference was not significant. Conclusion: The ingestion of CC with either a high or low GI meal significantly impairs acute blood glucose management and insulin sensitivity compared with ingestion of DC. Future investigations are warranted to determine whether CC is a risk factor for insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose, Curcumin, Sugar, And Coffee

Blood Glucose, Curcumin, Sugar, And Coffee

Impact of postprandial glucose control on diabetes-related complications: How is the evidence evolving? Conflicting findings in the literature and lack of long-term definitive outcome studies have led to difficulty in drawing conclusions about the role of postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetes and its complications. Recent scientific publications support the role of postprandial glucose (PPG) as a key contributor to overall glucose control and a predictor of microvascular and macrovascular events. However, the need remains for definitive evidence to support the precise relationship between PPG excursions and the development and progression of cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Drawing firm conclusions on the relationship between PPG and microvascular and macrovascular complications is challenged by the absence of antidiabetic agents that can specifically exert their action on PPG alone, without a basal glucose-lowering effect. Areas under investigation include interventions that more closely approximate 'normal' physiological postprandial responses, as well as technologies that advance the mode of insulin delivery or optimize methods to sense glycemic levels and variation. In conclusion, the precise role of postprandial hyperglycemia in relation to development of diabetic complications is unclarified and is one of the remaining unanswered questions in diabetes. Nevertheless, current evidence supports PPG control as an important strategy to consider in the comprehensive management plan of individuals with diabetes. J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Mar;30(2):374-85. Delphinol® standardized maqui berry extract reduces postprandial blood glucose increase in individuals with impaired glucose regulation by novel mechanism of sodium glucose cotransporter inhibition. AIM: Continue reading >>

Can Coffee Lower Blood Sugar Levels?

Can Coffee Lower Blood Sugar Levels?

Coffee is a commonly consumed beverage because of its caffeine content, which has many different effects on the human body and can impact blood glucose levels. However, coffee appears to have different effects on blood glucose in the long term than in the short term, so more research needs to be done to determine the exact relationship between coffee and blood glucose. Video of the Day Caffeine stimulates your central nervous systems and other parts of your body, leading to a feeling of increased alertness and energy. The amount of caffeine in an 8-oz. serving of coffee can vary wildly, from 27 to 200 mg. Even coffee from major retailers can vary in its caffeine content; an 8-oz. serving of Dunkin' Donuts coffee may contain between 71 and 103 mg of caffeine. Instant coffee often has less caffeine. Short-Term Effects of Caffeine In the short term, caffeine can cause an increase in blood glucose levels. Caffeine decreases your body's sensitivity to insulin, a hormone that helps regulate blood glucose levels. By reducing your response to insulin, caffeine causes an increase in blood glucose levels. A study, published in a 2004 issue of "Diabetes Care" found that individuals had higher insulin levels after drinking coffee for four weeks and had higher blood glucose levels after two weeks. Although in the short term caffeine appears to increase blood glucose levels, it may have the opposite effect in the long term. In 2004, "The Journal of the American Medical Association" published a study that examined insulin sensitivity in individuals who were habitual coffee drinkers. This study found that coffee drinkers had increased insulin sensitivity, which suggests that in the long term coffee can decrease blood glucose levels. Chronically high blood sugar levels can damage your b Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Is It Good For Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Is It Good For Diabetes?

In the past, coffee was believed to be bad for the overall health. But nowadays, there is growing evidence that the coffee might actually be beneficial and help protect from Parkinson’s disease, certain types of cancer, depression and liver disease. One study came to the conclusion that if you increase the intake of coffee that might be beneficial, which was contrary to the previous belief. In fact, increased intake of coffee can reduce the risk of the developing type 2 diabetes. This is great news for people who cannot go through the day or simply start the day without a cup of coffee. However, people who have type 2 diabetes should be careful. Why? Because in this case, the coffee could have negative effects. It does not matter if you have diabetes, or you cannot start your day without coffee, or maybe you are trying to reduce the risk of diabetes, you need to know about the effects coffee has when it comes to diabetes. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is actually a disease i.e. group of disease that actually has an effect on the way your body processes the sugar i.e. blood glucose. The blood glucose is crucial because it is the one that provides your tissues and muscles with energy and it fuels the brain. In the case of diabetes, there is too much circulation of blood glucose in the body which can lead to some health concerns. There are different factors that play a role when it comes to developing diabetes. The chronic types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. But, there are also other types such as gestational diabetes, which happens in time of pregnancy, but after birth, it usually goes away. Another type is prediabetes. In the case of prediabetes, the levels of blood glucose are higher than they usually are. However, they are not that high to be taken as diabetes. Sym Continue reading >>

How Coffee Affects Blood Sugar Levels & Diabetes

How Coffee Affects Blood Sugar Levels & Diabetes

Coffee has truly become a part of our culture and daily routine. People in the UK drink roughly 70 million cups of coffee per day, and in the U.S about 83% of adults drink coffee. Though most of us drink coffee, we each have our own “relationship” with the famous Cup of Joe. One would grab a coffee first thing in the morning, some before or at work and several people take additional coffee breaks during the day. But how does it affect our blood sugar levels? The History of Coffee Coffee was first discovered in Ethiopia almost a millennium ago, and since then has become a staple part of many people’s daily routine. The legend goes that a herder named Kaldi noticed that whenever his goats would eat the coffee beans they would become very energetic and couldn’t sleep at night. Kaldi brewed the first cup of joe, and the rest, well, the rest is history :). Caffeine Caffeine impacts the body in many ways, some of them good, but some of them bad. It can increase brain function and speed up one’s metabolism, but also is known to have direct effects on blood glucose and insulin. A study has found that Caffeine increases blood glucose significantly and makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar level, and others link it with reducing the risk of diabetes. As the verdict is not in yet, and there is conflicting evidence that caffeine can have both a negative as well as a positive effect on blood sugar levels, it is smart to limit your caffeine intake. Creamers and Sweeteners Be sure to use low fat, if not, non-dairy creamers with your coffee. Even more importantly, there are plenty of healthy sugar substitutes for people who like their coffee a bit sweet. Make it interesting, no need to use the usual carb-heavy dairy and sugar products. Tea Tea is Continue reading >>

Effects Of Coffee Consumption On Fasting Blood Glucose And Insulin Concentrations

Effects Of Coffee Consumption On Fasting Blood Glucose And Insulin Concentrations

Randomized controlled trials in healthy volunteers Higher habitual coffee consumption was associated with higher insulin sensitivity (1) and a lower risk for type 2 diabetes (2–6) in diverse populations. In contrast, short-term metabolic studies showed that caffeine intake can acutely lower insulin sensitivity (7–9) and increase glucose concentrations (10–15). Randomized intervention studies are needed to examine whether tolerance to these acute effects develops after longer-term consumption (16). We therefore examined the effects of coffee and caffeine on fasting blood concentrations of glucose and insulin over 2–4 weeks in two crossover studies in healthy volunteers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The studies were approved by the TNO Nutrition and Food Research Medical Ethics Committee, and all participants gave informed consent. The trials were originally designed to study the effects of coffee and caffeine on plasma concentrations of homocysteine, and the study designs have been reported in detail previously (17,18). Participants were regular coffee consumers (more than five cups/day) and did not have known diabetes. The first study was a 4-week crossover study that compared the effects of regular paper-filtered coffee consumption with that of coffee abstinence. A total of 40 volunteers used 1 l of coffee (70 g coffee grounds) for 4 weeks and abstained from coffee for 4 weeks in random order. Fourteen participants did not complete the trial because of nausea and restlessness (n = 7), possible susceptibility to adverse effects of caffeine intake (n = 3), or reasons unrelated to treatment (n = 4). Thus, 26 participants were included in the analysis. The second study had a Latin-square design with three treatments given in random order for 2 weeks each: caffeine ( Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Caffeine And Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever noticed a difference in your blood sugar after drinking a big cup of coffee or tea? According to the Mayo Clinic, caffeine can indeed have an affect on your blood glucose levels causing lower or higher fluctuations, so limited consumption is recommended for better control. Another study published by the ADA (2005) suggests that people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of hypoglycemia during the night by having a small to moderate amount of caffeine before bed. Some people also claim that symptoms of hypoglycemia become more noticeable when incorporating caffeine into their diet. The effects of caffeine on each person are varied though with the added factor of tolerance to the stimulant can build up as quantity increases. While some people claim that they see a noticeable difference in their BG levels when they drink caffeine, others say that they don’t have any issues incorporating caffeine with food. Let’s explore some variables that could contribute to the shift in BG levels in relation to caffeine consumption. Side effects Certain common side effects of caffeine consumption may often explain shifts in BG levels. Lack of sleep Not enough sleep has proven to contribute to insulin resistance in the body for people with Type 1. Too much caffeine could certainly contribute to insomnia, especially since caffeine tolerance decreases as we grow older. Elevated heart rate / “the jitters” Two common effects if too much caffeine is in the system, or if the body is not accustomed to it. These are also symptoms of hypoglycemia, which might cause someone with Type 1 to check their BG levels more frequently if mistaking the symptoms for a low. Heartburn / Upset stomach / Dehydration Some people are less tolerant to coffee and other caffeinat Continue reading >>

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

Positive Correlation Between Coffee Consumption And Adiponectin Levels

Positive Correlation Between Coffee Consumption And Adiponectin Levels

Diabetics who drink coffee had significantly lower HbA1c and higher adiponectin compared to those who did not… Researchers from India and Trinidad studied the levels of adiponectin in coffee drinkers for type 2 diabetes (DM2) and non-diabetic patients. This was a cross-sectional study including 220 non-diabetic subjects, 143 of who consumed coffee and 77 did not. They were matched with 90 diabetic subjects, 48 consumed coffee and 42 did not. Coffee consumption was more than three cups per day for more than 15 years. The primary outcome was to determine the amount of adiponectin in DM2 versus normal subjects. Fasting blood sugar of 5 ml was collected and adiponectin was determined using ELISA. An unpaired t-test was used to analyze FBS, PPBG, HbA1c and adiponectin. The results showed no significant difference (P<0.05) in FBG and PPBG for diabetic and coffee status. HbA1c and adiponectin levels were significantly different in diabetic and coffee status. Diabetics who drink coffee had significantly lower HbA1c and higher adiponectin compared to those who did not. This study showed that diabetic patients in the coffee-consumption group had lower fasting blood glucose compared to those who never consumed coffee. There was also a positive relationship between coffee consumption and adiponectin level, which is consistent with previous studies. Practice Pearls: Not everybody drinks 3 cups of coffee per day for 15 years, but those that have may be at a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Coffee contains caffeine, which is responsible for the up-regulation of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ expression, resulting in increased adipocyte expression and increased adiponectin secretion. With future studies, we can find other methods to increase adiponectin besides caffeine Continue reading >>

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