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Coconut Oil And Diabetes Mayo Clinic

Vaginal Dryness — Symptoms, Causes And Remedies

Vaginal Dryness — Symptoms, Causes And Remedies

Vaginal dryness is a symptom that I discuss with women every week. Typically, it isn’t the main reason that brings a woman to the clinic, but the topic comes up when we discuss other related subjects, such as painful intercourse or persistent pelvic pain. Understandably, the problem of vaginal dryness is more common in menopausal women. Vaginal dryness sometimes can be more distressing for younger women who are still menstruating, because it causes discomfort with daily activities or during sex. Vaginal dryness can be impacted by a handful of factors. Estrogen probably is the most important hormonal influence on the health of the vulva and vagina. Low estrogen can contribute to dryness. Diet and the use of other medications also are important factors. You can expect any medications that cause dry eyes and dry mouth to have a similar effect on the vagina, as well. An interesting study in 2015 showed that a daily oral soy supplement could improve vaginal dryness. Estrogen levels in the blood vary during the month and follow a common pattern for each menstrual cycle. For women not on hormonal birth control, levels are lowest in the days just before and after the start of menstrual bleeding. This low level sometimes can contribute to vulvar and vaginal dryness. Women on combination oral contraceptives containing both estrogen and progestin are unlikely to experience such dryness. We don’t fully understand why some women develop uncomfortable symptoms, such as vaginal dryness, vulvar pain and itching towards the end of their menstrual cycle, while others have no problems. Most likely, there are additional factors that are made worse by the lower estrogen level expected at the end of the menstrual cycle. There are a lot of interesting theories and ongoing research into th Continue reading >>

The Truth About Coconut Oil

The Truth About Coconut Oil

Coconut oil: You can’t browse social media -- or the grocery store shelves -- these days without running across it. The sweet-smelling tropical staple is rumored to slow aging, help your heart and thyroid, protect against illnesses like Alzheimer’s, arthritis and diabetes, and even help you lose weight. People are using it in everything from smoothies to bulletproof coffee, a mug of java spiked with coconut oil and butter. Should you sign up for an oil change? Coconut oil is made by pressing the fat from the white “meat” inside the giant nut. About 84% of its calories come from saturated fat. To compare, 14% of olive oil’s calories are from saturated fat and 63% of butter’s are. “This explains why, like butter and lard, coconut oil is solid at room temperature with a long shelf life and the ability to withstand high cooking temperatures,” says registered dietitian Lisa Young, PhD. And it’s the reason coconut oil has a bad rap from many health officials. But there may be a saving grace. Coconut oil’s saturated fat is made up mostly of medium-chain triglycerides, or MCTs. Some people say your body handles them differently than the longer-chain fats in liquid vegetable oils, dairy, and fatty meats. The American Heart Association says to limit saturated fat to no more than 13 grams a day. That’s the amount found in about one tablespoon of coconut oil. Fans of coconut oil point to studies that suggest the MCT-saturated fat in coconut could boost your HDL or “good” cholesterol. This, they claim, makes it less bad for your heart health than the saturated fat in animal-based foods like cheese and steak or products containing trans fats. But it also raises your LDL “bad” cholesterol. A quick cholesterol lesson: “But just because coconut oil can ra Continue reading >>

Is Coconut Oil Heart Healthy?

Is Coconut Oil Heart Healthy?

Is coconut oil heart healthy? There are plenty of people promoting coconut oil as a heart-smart choice, but read this before you make an oil change. Everyone seems to be crazy for coconut oil these days, and I’ve had clients and friends ask me if they should be eating a tablespoon or more a day to help them lower their cholesterol and lose belly fat. I also think I know where a lot of the coconut oil craze started. In one of his shows, Dr. Oz said, “Coconut oil is a miracle food with super powers.” He went on to say that the oil’s most powerful benefits include weight loss, skin health and treating ulcers. But before you make an oil change, there’s more to the story and as we’ve said before good TV often equals bad medicine. Coconut Oil Nutrition: It’s 87% Saturated Fat As Dr. Oz said, “…Coconut oil has gotten a bad rap because it’s saturated fat. But the science and research is changing all that we know about coconut oil.” It’s true: Coconut oil is naturally rich in saturated fat, with 12-13 grams of saturated fat per tablespoon. In fact, it has more saturated fat than lard, butter and any of the popular vegetables oils like olive oil, corn, canola, safflower or soybean oils. That’s what makes it so firm and solid at room temperature. Saturated fat is like blood sludge that raises harmful LDL cholesterol levels and the American Heart Association recommends that we keep saturated fat to less than 7% of total calories. For a woman, that’s no more than 14 grams of saturated fat a day—or about what you get in a tablespoon of coconut oil. Experts at most health organizations as well as Harvard School of Public Health, Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic say you should use it sparingly due to its saturated fat and calorie counts. In addition, I kno Continue reading >>

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Controlling your blood sugar level is an ongoing concern when you have diabetes. Your diet, activity level and medications all have a role in the complex metabolic processes involved in regulating blood sugar levels. Some people advocate consuming coconut oil to help control blood sugar levels. As of publication, however, a search of the medical literature reveals no evidence that coconut oil directly improves blood sugar levels. Video of the Day Coconut oil is more than 85 percent saturated fat. According to the American Diabetes Association's November 2013 nutrition guidelines, few studies have examined the relationship between the amount of saturated fat in the diet and blood sugar control. However, there is a well-known increased risk for heart disease among people living with diabetes. The ADA recommends limiting saturated fat -- including tropical oils such as coconut oil -- to no more than 10 percent of total calories to reduce the risk for heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends that less than 7 percent of calories come from saturated fat. Saturated Fat Type May Matter Coconut oil is a medium-chain fatty acid, whereas most saturated fats are long chain-fatty acids. Compared to long-chain fatty acids, medium-chain fatty acids are more easily metabolized. They provide quicker energy and are not typically stored as body fat. Since fat metabolism is closely linked to other metabolic processes that affect blood sugar regulation, there is interest in exploring whether medium-chain fatty acids may indirectly affect insulin or blood sugar levels. However, as of the time of publication, these studies have not been conducted in people to determine if there is any role for medium-chain fatty acids, such as coconut oil, in the diets of people living with di Continue reading >>

Eggs For Diabetics-mayo Clinic

Eggs For Diabetics-mayo Clinic

I came across the following article from MAYO CLINIC.Found intesting. Are chicken eggs good or bad for my cholesterol? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. Chicken eggs are high in cholesterol, but the effect of egg consumption on blood cholesterol is minimal when compared with the effect of trans fats and saturated fats. The risk of heart disease may be more closely tied to the foods that accompany the eggs in a traditional American breakfast — such as the sodium in the bacon, sausages and ham, and the saturated fat or oils with trans fats used to fry the eggs and the hash browns. Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk of heart disease. Some studies have shown that this level of egg consumption may actually prevent some types of strokes. But the story is different for people who have diabetes. In this ever-growing population, eating seven eggs a week significantly increases the risk of heart disease. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one large egg has about 186 mg milligrams (mg) of cholesterol — all of which is found in the yolk. When deciding whether to include eggs in your diet, consider the recommended daily limits on cholesterol in your food: If you are healthy, consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day. If you have diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease, limit the daily cholesterol intake to no more than 200 mg a day. If you like eggs but don't want the extra cholesterol, use only the egg whites. Egg whites contain no cholesterol. You may also use cholesterol-free egg substitutes, which are made with egg whites. With Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. Continue reading >>

Mayo Clinic Minute: Why Coconut Oil Is Bad For Your Heart

Mayo Clinic Minute: Why Coconut Oil Is Bad For Your Heart

You may have heard the claims that coconut oil is good for your health. A quick internet search reveals articles that recommend coconut oil for everything from boosting memory to improving heart health. Mayo Clinic experts say buyer beware, especially when it comes to coconut oil and your heart. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute Journalists: A broadcast-quality video package (0:56) is available in the download. Read the script. Is coconut oil healthy? “Good for your skin, not good in your body.” Cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky says coconut oil is not good for your heart health, because it raises bad cholesterol. “Forty years ago, a study was done looking at butter, lard, beef suet or coconut oil. Which one raised your bad cholesterol the most? And guess what? It was the coconut oil.” How can a plant be worse for you than animal fat? “We know that the coconut oil is a very saturated fat. Even though it does grow from the ground, and nothing that grows from the ground has cholesterol in it. It is a saturated fat that turns into cholesterol.” Dr. Kopecky says coconut water is OK, and so are occasional flakes on salads or treats. But avoid coconut oil. “Don’t eat it. It really does raise your bad cholesterol.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Cholesterol

Coconut Oil And Cholesterol

Coconut oil has been in the headlines in recent years for various health reasons. In particular, experts go back and forth debating about whether or not it is good for cholesterol levels. While some experts say you should avoid coconut oil because of its high levels of saturated fat (saturated fat is known to raise cholesterol), others claim that the fat’s structure makes it less likely to add to fat buildup in the body, and that therefore it’s healthy. There are a lot of conflicting reports about whether or not coconut oil can help maintain healthy cholesterol, lower “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, or if it can help raise “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Research has not been too definitive either way. There are many facts known about this oil, however, and that may assist you in choosing whether or not to incorporate it into your diet. Consulting your physician is also a good idea. Read More: The Health Benefits of Coconut Oil » What Is Coconut Oil? Coconut oil is a tropical oil that is derived from the dried nut of the coconut palm tree. It contains nearly 13.6 grams of total fat and 12 grams of saturated fat per tablespoon. It also contains nearly 0.8 grams of monounsaturated fats and about 0.2 grams of polyunsaturated fats, which are both considered “healthy” fats. It does not contain cholesterol. It is high in Vitamin E and polyphenols. According to the Mayo Clinic, the oil from fresh coconuts contains a large amount of medium chain fatty acids. Those do not seem to become stored in fat tissue as much as long chain fatty acids. That’s why some people call coconut oil a weight loss tool. These experts say that coconut oil’s lauric acid, which is a healthy type of saturated fatty acid, is quickly burned up by Continue reading >>

The Truth About Coconut Oil

The Truth About Coconut Oil

I’ve been looking back at my blog in 2013 and thinking about what I want to change or do differently and it occurred to me that I haven’t really been writing about life. My blog’s motto is, after all, “food, travel, life.” So I’ve decided to change that and write about things affecting my life or my friends’ lives and life in Switzerland. My first post is about coconut oil. It seems like everybody everywhere has been saying how great coconut oil is, how it will cure [insert medical condition or disease here], and how awesome it is as a beauty product. Fox News has an article listing coconut oil as one of the oils which can improve your health if you consume it (source) and the Today Show had a segment on “5 Best Skin Foods: Eat Your Way to Beautiful” where they claim coconut oil may speed up your metabolism (source). But its not just news articles, but also famous celebrities like Dr. Oz. You can also easily find a multitude of pins on Pinterest claiming coconut oil can: help with weight loss, boost immunity, improve heart health, fight infections, aid digestion, and practically cure diabetes. My big question about all of this was “Is any of this true?”! Can Coconut Oil Cure Diseases and Help with Weight-Loss? I started my search for the truth with Web MD and this article. There is very limited evidence on disease outcomes, says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, of Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health. “All that has been studied well is the impact of coconut oil on cholesterol levels and the findings are intriguing but we still don’t know if it is harmful or beneficial,” Mozaffarian says. (source) Neither the American Heart Association (AHA) nor the U.S. government’s 2010 Dietary Guidelines suggest that coconut oil is any Continue reading >>

Mayo Clinic Dead Wrong On Diabetic Recommendations

Mayo Clinic Dead Wrong On Diabetic Recommendations

Statins, which are a class of drugs used to lower your cholesterol, are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the world, and I believe, one of the most unnecessary drugs there are. This is one class of drugs that I am dedicated to sound the alarm about. We are actually in the process of seeking to replicate a campaign similar to what was done to raise awareness of the dangers of smoking, to inform the public about the dangers and combat the media fraud, deception and manipulation that causes people to believe otherwise. They could have saved loads of time and money here by reading this website, because the answer to the question, “When should you begin taking a statin?” is “never.” No computer models required. Why? Because it’s safe to say that a drug intended to prevent heart disease which actually causes heart failure is not the right treatment for most people. Statin drugs offer a “cure” that is far worse than the disease. Why It’s Highly Unlikely You’ll Ever Need a Statin Drug At least 12 million Americans are already taking statins, and based on new expert recommendations another 23 million “should” be taking them. Now, there are a small group of people with genetic enzyme defects that have cholesterols levels above 325-350 who seem to benefit from statins. However, in my clinical experience over more than two decades and tens of thousands of patients, there have been a grand total of three patients that required statins to control this relatively uncommon genetic problem. What This Computer Model Will NOT Tell You It’s the emergence of these kinds of dangerous diagnostic strategies that make it so important to remain educated on this issue and not simply go along with what the media and professionals claim.. Especially since sta Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil Vs. Olive Oil For Heart Health

Coconut Oil Vs. Olive Oil For Heart Health

Recently, as a cardiologist, I have been asked a lot about the heart benefits of different oils. As consumers respond to the growing array of oil options, promotion of potential health benefits of different oils has increased. These supposed health benefits range from improved heart health, weight loss, treatment of bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn’s disease, high cholesterol management, increased energy, and reduced symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes the lists of potential benefits grow so long they resemble some of the miracle elixir lists promoted centuries ago. Right now, I want to stick with potential heart-related benefits of two oils. I'll look carefully at coconut oil because it has received a lot of attention lately. Finally, I'll compare it to my favorite heavyweight among oils, olive oil. Two main types of coconut oil are virgin and refined: Virgin coconut oil is removed from coconut milk by a process called wet extraction, largely free of refining. Copra oil is extracted from dried coconut meat and requires some amount of chemical refining, bleaching, and deodorizing. This may destroy some of the oil's compounds that promote heart health, such as phenols and antioxidants. Most of the research into the health benefits of coconut oil both as a cooking oil and as an essential oil for skin care has been done using virgin coconut oil. 3 Health Benefits of Virgin Coconut Oil 1. It contains antioxidants that can decrease oxidative stress. Virgin coconut oils in the diet are rich in antioxidants such as flavonoids and polyphenols, which have many potential heart-health benefits. When the heart and blood vessels are exposed to a process called oxidative stress, plaques can develop in arteries, which can lead to heart attacks. B Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Stop prediabetes in its tracks It's estimated that up to 1 in 4 Americans has developed or has been diagnosed with prediabetes (insulin resistance). Many more are at risk. Having insulin resistance means that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance usually causes no symptoms, but can lead to worsening of cholesterol levels and high blood pressure — and it increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Moreover, once you develop prediabetes, research indicates that within 10 years, you're likely to go on to develop type 2 diabetes. That is, unless you do something about it. Subscribers - please sign in to your online edition to continue reading! Not a subscriber and interested in full access to articles like this and more? Subscribe today! ALSO IN THIS ISSUE Click Here To See Entire Issue Continue reading >>

Mayo Clinic Health Letter Reliable Information For A Healthier Life

Mayo Clinic Health Letter Reliable Information For A Healthier Life

Preventing type 2 diabetes Stop prediabetes in its tracks It’s estimated that up to 1 in 4 Ameri- cans has developed or has been diag- nosed with prediabetes (insulin resis- tance). Many more are at risk. Having insulin resistance means that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be con- sidered type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance usually causes no symptoms, but can lead to worsening of cholesterol levels and high blood pressure — and it increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Moreover, once you develop prediabetes, re- search indicates that within 10 years, you’re likely to go on to develop type 2 diabetes. That is, unless you do some- thing about it. Thankfully, you can. By losing around 7 percent of your body weight with improved diet and exercise, it’s very likely that you can prevent type 2 diabetes — and maybe even return your glucose levels to normal. Losing weight may sound like a lot of work, but when you consider the hassle, expense and discomfort of deal- ing with type 2 diabetes and its many Every time you eat, your body converts a portion of the digested food into glucose. Your blood carries the glucose to your body’s tissues, where the cells use it as fuel. Glucose enters your cells with the help of insulin, which is produced by the pan- creas. Insulin acts as a master key, unlocking the doors of your cells and allowing glucose inside. Coming in August BLOOD CLOTS IN THE LUNGS Prompt treatment may be lifesaving. DEVICES FOR PAIN When all else fails. BASIC PAIN RELIEVERS It’s wise to use caution. CORE MUSCLES Strengthen and maintain for stability. Inside this issue HEALTH TIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Protect your hearing. NEWS AND OUR VIEWS . . Continue reading >>

Can Coconut Oil Help Me Lose Weight?

Can Coconut Oil Help Me Lose Weight?

The few small studies that have looked at coconut oil for weight loss suggest that coconut oil may help reduce waist size, but it doesn't lead to significant weight loss or improved body mass index (BMI). Coconut oil is a tropical oil that's made from the dried fruit (nut) of the coconut palm tree. Proponents say that it contains a healthy type of saturated fatty acid (lauric acid) that your body quickly burns for energy. The oil extracted from fresh coconut contains a relatively large amount of medium-chain fatty acids, which don't appear to be stored in adipose tissue as readily as do long-chain fatty acids. This in part is why some people started looking at coconut oil as a weight-loss aid. However, coconut oil is still high in calories and saturated fat. Coconut oil has more saturated fat than lard does. Short-term studies have suggested medium-chain fatty acids, such as lauric acid, do not raise serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as much as do long-chain fatty acids. However, there are few long-term studies looking at the relationship between coconut oil and heart health. In addition, 1 tablespoon contains 13.6 grams of fat and 117 calories. Consuming too much will give you extra calories — and that can signal to your body that it's time to store more fat. Even if the stored fat doesn't come directly from the coconut oil, high doses of coconut oil could still indirectly contribute to the very problem you are trying to address. Although eating coconut oil in moderation isn't going to result in great harm to your health, it's not likely to help you lose weight either. For successful, long-term weight loss, stick to the basics — an overall healthy-eating plan and exercise. Continue reading >>

Is Coconut Oil For Diabetes?-without Coconut Oil You’re Missing Out On…

Is Coconut Oil For Diabetes?-without Coconut Oil You’re Missing Out On…

Is coconut oil for diabetes? I’m sure that you’ve heard of coconut oil? Ok, most folks have heard of it but don’t know how beneficial it is for you. What are the benefits of coconut oil for diabetes? I shall get into that shortly along with the many other wonderful benefits of what it provides for your health. The coconut palm tree is an awesome tree growing between 60 and 70 feet tall and give live upwards of 60+ years. Coconuts are used in cosmetic production and medicinal purposes. Coconut oil has so many awesome benefits for your health. It’s used in helping your skin look healthy and glowing and it aids in making healthier and stronger hair. It’s also used in cooking recipes. If you start taking it daily, you can detoxify your body. How does it help control heart disease? Because it’s high in saturated fats it increases the healthy cholesterol (HDL) and at the same time converting the bad cholesterol (LDL) into good cholesterol. This promotes a healthy heart and lowers the risk of heart disease. Coconut oil and type 2 diabetes connection This oil helps control cravings and hunger. When you’re overweight and have blood sugar problems, you want to learn about anything that will help this issue. While this substance is so good for you, the most important benefits are for diabetes as far as I’m concerned. Once you start refraining or cutting back on refined carbohydrates and refined sugars thereby increasing healthy saturated fats, you can start reversing your diabetes. When studies were done from previous societies of people who had many of their caloric intake from saturated fats from coconut oil, it showed that diabetes was very rare back then. This oil is your protection against the resistance of insulin. Coconut oil is the closest thing to a diabet Continue reading >>

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