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Coconut Oil And Diabetes 2015

What's To Know About Coconut Oil?

What's To Know About Coconut Oil?

Coconut oil has a saturated fat content of 90 percent. Oils high in saturated fats have been found to increase the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases. However, coconut oil has grown in popularity in recent years, amid claims that it can do everything from supporting weight loss to slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Manufacturers have replaced other oils with coconut oil in packaged products, and many households use it for cooking. It features not only in fried food, but in sweets, shampoos, coffee, and smoothies. In July 2016, results of a survey in the United States (U.S.) showed that 72 percent of people think coconut oil is healthful. However, only 37 percent of nutritionists agree. After all, it is still saturated fat, and the American Heart Association (AHA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) caution consumers against coconut and other tropical oils. Find out more about the controversy, and if you should make coconut oil a staple in your diet. Here are some key points about coconut oil. More detail is in the main article. Coconut oil has increased in popularity in recent years due to reputed health benefits. Overall, research does not currently appear to support increasing consumption of saturated fats, including coconut oil. It can be a tasty addition to a number of recipes, but it should be used with care. Benefits Coconut oil contains 2.6 percent fewer calories than other fats. It has been said to provide various health benefits. Here are a few of them: Increasing "good" cholesterol: A component in coconut oil has been found to give "good" HDL cholesterol "a nudge." Controlling blood sugar: It appears to preserve insulin action and insulin resistance in mice. Reducing stress: It has antistress and antioxidant properties, which coul Continue reading >>

Soybean Oil Causes More Obesity Than Coconut Oil, Fructose

Soybean Oil Causes More Obesity Than Coconut Oil, Fructose

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Soybean oil causes more obesity than coconut oil, fructose Scientists found mice on high soybean oil diet showed increased levels of weight gain, diabetes compared to mice on a high fructose diet or high coconut oil diet A diet high in soybean oil causes more obesity and diabetes than a diet high in fructose, a sugar commonly found in soda and processed foods, according to a new study. In the U.S. the consumption of soybean oil has increased greatly in the last four decades due to a number of factors, including results from studies in the 1960s that found a positive correlation between saturated fatty acids and the risk of cardiovascular disease. A diet high in soybean oil causes more obesity and diabetes than a diet high in fructose, a sugar commonly found in soda and processed foods, UC Riverside researchers found. A diet high in soybean oil causes more obesity and diabetes than a diet high in fructose, a sugar commonly found in soda and processed foods, UC Riverside researchers found. A diet high in soybean oil causes more obesity and diabetes than a diet high in fructose, a sugar commonly found in soda and processed foods, according to a just published paper by scientists at the University of California, Riverside. The scientists fed male mice a series of four diets that contained 40 percent fat, similar to what Americans currently consume. In one diet the researchers used coconut oil, which consists primarily of saturated fat. In the second diet about half of the coconut oil was replaced with soybean oil, which contains primarily polyunsaturated fats and is a main ingredient in vegetable oil. That diet corresponded with roughly the amount of soybean oil Americans currently consume. The o Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil Prevents And Manages Diabetes - Scientist

Coconut Oil Prevents And Manages Diabetes - Scientist

Coconut Oil Prevents and Manages Diabetes - Scientist Dr Kaku Kyiamah a Scientist has recommended virgin coconut oil as an edible oil to prevent and manage diabetes. Other suitable edible oils to prevent diabetes include organic mammalian butter and fat, virgin palm oil, virgin olive oil, palm kernel oil, cocoa butter and shea butter. Speaking to the Ghana News Agency in an interview, Dr Kyiamah explained that virgin coconut oil could be used to manage diabetes within six weeks and manage most cancers, sores and asthma conditions. He noted that with the onset of diabetes, any food item that contained processed unsaturated vegetable oil and fish oil should be avoided and eliminated from the diet. It is now known that fat is needed by the cells for maintaining good health. Actually fat is essential for survival. Herbivore mammals do not eat fat. They ferment the ingested grass in their first stomach to produce acetic acid which is used to naturally make the suitable fat, i.e. saturated and mono unsaturated fatty acids (no poly unsaturated fatty acids), required by the cells. Diabetes, he said, was a disease which affected the bodys ability to use glucose for energy and when diagnosed, the blood sugar level was monitored very often. Whereas medication and insulin were used to lower blood glucose levels as much as possible, lifestyle changes are also recommended to help minimize complications such as heart attack, stroke, limb loss, kidney damage, blindness and depression. The conventional lifestyle changes often recommended were Low-fat and high-fiber diet, minimizing simple and processed sugars, exercising and maintenance of a healthy weight. Various supplements, mainly antioxidants with the aim to stabilize cell membranes, are often recommended by the healthcare provide Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Coffee And Diabetes: Is It Right For You?

Bulletproof Coffee And Diabetes: Is It Right For You?

Bulletproof coffee: you’ve probably heard of it. The Diabetes.co.uk forum users can’t stop talking about it. There are articles about bulletproof coffee all over the internet, every one of which seems to have a different opinion as to the benefits or otherwise of the stuff. Some swear by it, some would rather swear at it. Less common are guides to bulletproof coffee and diabetes. This is an attempt at a comprehensive one (but I can’t promise that it’s definitive. Opinions, inevitably, will differ). So: should people with diabetes drink bulletproof coffee? And, if so, is it healthy to have it for breakfast every day? Let’s take a look. What is bulletproof coffee? Coffee mixed with unsalted butter and coconut oil. The idea is you drink it instead of eating breakfast. It’s supposed to work for weight loss and type 2 diabetes. No carbs, and the saturated fat keeps you feeling full. People disagree about the specifics of making it. Some insist on unsalted butter, which contains more in terms of nutrition, but some get by fine without it. And while bulletproof coffee is usually made with coconut oil, some people prefer MCT oil. It’s all a bit subjective. MCT stands for “medium chain triglycerides,” which are fatty acids. These fatty acids are good for your health. There are four kinds: lauric acid, caprylic acid, caproic acid, and capric acid. Coconut oil contains all four of these fatty acids. MCT oil, unlike coconut oil, is manufactured, rather than being found in nature. The theory behind it is: medium chain triglycerides are good, so let’s make an oil that separates them from the rest of the oil. Supposedly, the more MCTs you have, the more health benefits. So the thinking goes that MCT oil is healthier than coconut oil. The problem with MCT oil is tha Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Coconut Oil

The Benefits Of Coconut Oil

I have been using many new oils to cook or take for health reasons, including flax seed oil, hemp oil, and coconut oil. I’ve have done a lot of research and have come to the conclusion that coconut oil not only tastes great, but the health benefits are amazing. I encourage you to take a look into some of the benefits and give it a try. Of course, one of the first things I looked into were the affects it would have with diabetes and I was very impressed. Benefits of Coconut Oil Diabetes This is one fat that diabetics can eat without fear. Not only does it not contribute to diabetes, but it helps regulate blood sugar, thus lessening the effects of the disease. Island people have consumed large amounts of coconut oil for many generations without ever encountering diabetes, but when they abandoned it for other foods and oils, the results were disastrous. Weight Loss The connection between coconut oil and weight loss is interesting. Farmers in America discovered this early last century when they tried to fatten their cattle by feeding them coconut oil. Instead of gaining weight, their cattle lost weight! So again, this is not news. Do a simple Internet search such as “benefits of coconut oil” and you will get plenty of details. Bone and Dental Health Coconut oil improves calcium and magnesium absorption in the body, which in turn is greatly beneficial to dental and bone health. The improved calcium absorption created by coconut oil use ceases tooth decay and aids in the development of strong teeth. The combined increased calcium and magnesium absorption are of great benefit to middle-aged women who may become afflicted with osteoporosis. Coconut Oil: A Good Saturated Fat? You may ask, isn't coconut oil a saturated fat? And aren't saturated fats harmful? Yes, coconut oi Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Can You Eat Coconut Oil If You Have Diabetes? If you’re living with diabetes, you’ve likely been through the diet overhaul. Out with the rippled chips, white bread, and full-fat cheese. In with the whole-wheat toast, tofu, and celery sticks. Now you may want to replace the fats you use in your cooking. You may have heard coconut oil may be a good substitute, but you may not be sure how it would affect your diabetes. Is it better or worse? Here’s what you need to know about coconut oil and diabetes. Coconut oil, also known as copra oil, is derived from the meat of mature coconuts. The oil is rich in antioxidants and energy-boosting triglycerides, and low in cholesterol. Not only does the oil have a sweet, nutty flavor, but it also leaves behind little grease. It’s commonly used as a replacement for butter and olive or vegetable oils when baking or cooking. Coconut oil also has many cosmetic uses, such as: a natural skin moisturizer a leave-in condition for your hair an ingredient in homemade soap scrub and lotion recipes If you have diabetes, you know that maintaining a healthy weight is a key component of a diabetes meal plan. This is especially true of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes generally begins with your body’s resistance to insulin. Insulin resistance is linked to excess weight. A 2008 study found that people who consumed medium-chain fats like coconut oil as part of a weight loss plan lost more fat than participants who used olive oil. Coconut oil is high in medium-chain fats. This means coconut oil, a solid fat, is harder to convert to stored fat. This makes it easier for your body to burn it off. Although separate studies, such as this 2009 study in Lipids, have corroborated this, there isn’t enough research to definitively support this claim. Re Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Coconut Oil | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community the benefits of coconut oil were considered controversial because some felt there was not enough evidence-based research to support the benefits of coconut oil. The concern was that the demand for the oil was falsely generated and it might just be anther fad with higher risks associated with cardio vascular disease. Today there are many studies that have shown it to be a healthy addition to the diet. It has been demonstrated to have anti-viral properties, improving insulin absorption and to help regulate blood sugars in patients, by raising the metabolic rate. Some research shows that it boosts energy and endurance, and many cultures consider it to have medicinal properties. This is by no means an endorsement of coconut oil as a magic cure or treatment for diabetes, but it does seem to be a good choice for cooking and preparing food, due to the beneficial qualities attributed to this often forgotten oil. Coconut oil is one of the most stable oils you can buy, so it does not turn rancid easily. It is also considered by some to be a low fat fat because it is broken down rapidly and used for quick energy like a carbohydrate, not stored like other fats. Ask Nadia and you will receive her unique perspective on your question.. Nadias new column will appear regularly in Diabetes Health magazine, newsletters, and on our website DiabetesHealth.com. the benefits of coconut oil were considered controversial because some felt there was not enough evidence-based research to support the benefits of coconut oil. The concern was that the demand for the oil was falsely generated and it might just be anther fad with higher risks associated with cardio vascular disease. Continue reading >>

How Coconut Oil Regulates Insulin

How Coconut Oil Regulates Insulin

A study done in 2009 at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia found that a diet rich in coconut oil protected against insulin resistance. By ingesting just ½ to 1 tablespoon of coconut oil prior to meals and snacks, many diabetics find relief from their blood sugar fluctuations and resulting symptoms, allowing them to return to a healthy lifestyle free of pinpricks and medications. Coconut oil’s abundance of specialized saturated fats made of lauric acid provide preventative health boosting benefits, and its medium-chain fatty acids improve blood health and slow the rate by which food is digested. These fats have remarkable effects on regulating blood sugar levels and reducing spikes, thereby helping diabetics to maintain stable blood sugar levels throughout the day. Coconut oil’s illness-preventing properties also help to maintain overall health. Although a number of pharmaceutical drugs are available to treat diabetes, many of these drugs have harmful (and sometimes deadly) side effects. By eating a diet that is low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, that combines the macronutrients (carbohydrates, protein, and fats) in every meal, and that includes minimal polyunsaturated fats, many people with diabetes have been able to treat their insulin-resistant diagnoses naturally. Excerpted from Coconut Oil for Health by Britt Brandon. Copyright © 2015 F+W Media, Inc. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Home Blog Health Coconut Oil and Diabetes Diabetics are normally encouraged by experts and medical professionals to try and either eliminate fats or limit them from their diet. And of course, you can understand why. But theres one fat individuals need not be afraid of in any shape or form. For coconut oil can work to regulate blood glucose levels and protect against insulin resistance. So you may like to consider incorporating the oil into your diet once youve read this article, though of course always talk to your doctor first before taking any form of supplement. So in terms of the properties of coconut oil what do we already know? Take A Look At This Interesting Article To Find Out More: Well we know this wonderful gift from nature is made up of medium chain fatty acids, so fat is not stored in the body as this is immediately converted to energy. This is why of course, the oil can help greatly with losing weight as part of a balanced diet and exercise programme. The American Diabetes Association recently published a study looking closely at both obesity and peripheral insulin resistance. The oil of course, is easily digestible and it can simulate the bodys metabolism of fats. The conclusion of the study was very positive as they cited coconut oil as being beneficial to diabetics in this case. In fact the Indian Medical Association has recommended taking coconut oil to prevent diabetes. Youll find organic cold pressed virgin oil is freely available from us as a great way of consuming coconut oil. A study carried out in 2009 at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Australia by Dr. Nigel Turner and Associate Professor Jiming Ye revealed interesting results. They said a diet rich in coconut oil protects against insulin resistance (remember this is an impaired abi Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil: Diabetes Mvp Candidate

Coconut Oil: Diabetes Mvp Candidate

As you will see, coconut oil is very diabetic friendly and deserves the title Diabetes MVP! The three main topics for this post Coconut Oil has played an important rolein my personaldiabetes management for over eight years! Its associated with elevating beneficial HDL cholesterol, reducing insulin, lowering blood sugar! More benefits later in the post. People often associate me with meat consumption and I dont mind that at all. However, if I am to be associated with what I use the most? its coconut oil in a landslide. Read and heed! Additive in my coffee one or two tablespoons of coconut oil per cup. Cooking oil when I needed, rendered animal fats, coconut oil and butter are my favorites. Hair gel yes you read that correctly, I use coconut oil as a hair gel. :) Skin moisturizer our skin is our largest organ and benefits from coconut oil greatly. As a toothpaste I mix with baking soda! Before and after sun therapy if I know in advance that I will obtain a lot of sun, Ill lube up before going out, if not Ill lube up after obtaining a lot of sun. :) Before and after shaving I rarely shave with a razor, I use an electric beard trimmer but regardless, I lube up before and after shaving. :) Cuts, scrapes and blisters I do not normally use coconut oil, unless its a particularly nasty cut, but coconut oil has antimicrobial qualities that make it an excellent healing salve. Mild deodorant coconut oil applied under the arms is great as a mild deodorant. I also use baking soda and occasionally non-aluminum containing deodorants. Body lubricant I think most people can figure out what I am referring to here. :) Flea treatment for dogs I use it as a spot treatment for fleas, dipping my finger and rubbing on a flea when its found. Also if my dog has many fleas, I will massage into th Continue reading >>

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION This chapter will summarize current information on nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes for health care practitioners who treat them. The key take home message is that the 1800 calorie ADA diet is dead! The modern diet for the individual with diabetes is based on concepts from clinical research, portion control, and individualized lifestyle changes. It cannot simply be delivered by giving a patient a diet sheet in a one-size-fits-all approach. The lifestyle modification guidance and support needed requires a team effort, best led by an expert in this area; a registered dietitian (RD), or a referral to a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that includes instruction on nutrition therapy. Dietary recommendations need to be individualized for and accepted by the given patient. It’s important to note that the nutrition goals for diabetes are similar to those that healthy individuals should strive to incorporate into their lifestyle. Leading authorities and professional organizations have concluded that proper nutrition is an important part of the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. However, appropriate nutritional treatment, implementation, and ultimate compliance with the plan remain some of the most vexing problems in diabetic management for three major reasons: First, there are some differences in the dietary structure to consider, depending on the type of diabetes. Second, a plethora of dietary information is available from many sources to the patient and healthcare provider. Nutritional science is constantly evolving, so that what may be considered true today may be outdated in the near future. Different types of diabetes require some specialized nutritional intervention; however, many of the basic dietary princ Continue reading >>

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Coconut Oil Help Blood Sugar Levels?

Controlling your blood sugar level is an ongoing concern when you have diabetes. Your diet, activity level and medications all have a role in the complex metabolic processes involved in regulating blood sugar levels. Some people advocate consuming coconut oil to help control blood sugar levels. As of publication, however, a search of the medical literature reveals no evidence that coconut oil directly improves blood sugar levels. Video of the Day Coconut oil is more than 85 percent saturated fat. According to the American Diabetes Association's November 2013 nutrition guidelines, few studies have examined the relationship between the amount of saturated fat in the diet and blood sugar control. However, there is a well-known increased risk for heart disease among people living with diabetes. The ADA recommends limiting saturated fat -- including tropical oils such as coconut oil -- to no more than 10 percent of total calories to reduce the risk for heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends that less than 7 percent of calories come from saturated fat. Saturated Fat Type May Matter Coconut oil is a medium-chain fatty acid, whereas most saturated fats are long chain-fatty acids. Compared to long-chain fatty acids, medium-chain fatty acids are more easily metabolized. They provide quicker energy and are not typically stored as body fat. Since fat metabolism is closely linked to other metabolic processes that affect blood sugar regulation, there is interest in exploring whether medium-chain fatty acids may indirectly affect insulin or blood sugar levels. However, as of the time of publication, these studies have not been conducted in people to determine if there is any role for medium-chain fatty acids, such as coconut oil, in the diets of people living with di Continue reading >>

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

The Coconut Craze: Coconut Oil

Last week I wrote about coconut water. I’m curious — how many of you drink coconut water, or have at least tried it? As I mentioned in my posting, I’m not a big fan of it. But unless you’re guzzling down glass after glass of this tropical beverage, there are really no major harmful ramifications. But what about coconut oil? Controversial Coconut Oil Many nutrition topics are murky, and the issue of whether coconut oil is a “good” fat or a “bad” fat is a prime example. A lot of people swear by coconut oil for various reasons. Those who enjoy baking like coconut oil because it makes a mean flaky pie crust and lends a unique, rich flavor to pastries and other goodies. Others use coconut oil for everyday cooking, claiming that it adds great flavor to vegetables, oatmeal, and even popcorn. Coconut oil is used extensively in Thai and Indian dishes, which, of course, is partly why these dishes are so tasty. And then, there are those who swear by coconut oil for its supposed numerous health benefits, such as promoting weight loss, improving blood glucose control, and helping to treat heart disease. Can a tropical oil really live up to all these claims? A Bit of Background The use of coconut oil for cooking is nothing new in tropical regions. In the early 1900’s, this oil was actually used in the US as a cooking oil, but it gradually fell out of favor in the 1960’s when scientists began to examine coconut oil’s possible role in heart disease. The link between coconut oil and heart disease stems from the fact that coconut oil is primarily a saturated fat (92% of the fatty acids in this oil are saturated). And, for the most part, saturated fat, or the “bad” fat, is linked with promoting heart disease. But the tricky thing about saturated fats is that not Continue reading >>

Soybean Oil Is More Obesogenic And Diabetogenic Than Coconut Oil And Fructose In Mouse: Potential Role For The Liver

Soybean Oil Is More Obesogenic And Diabetogenic Than Coconut Oil And Fructose In Mouse: Potential Role For The Liver

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Soybean Oil Is More Obesogenic and Diabetogenic than Coconut Oil and Fructose in Mouse: Potential Role for the Liver Affiliation Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Affiliation Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Affiliation Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Current address: Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, Translational Research Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America Affiliation Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Affiliation Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Affiliation Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America Continue reading >>

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconuts, Coconut Milk, Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut oil has been called a “superfood” with positive effects on heart and brain health, weight loss (especially abdominal fat) and a whole host and anti-inflammatory effects. But is coconut oil really a superfood? Or is it just the newest fad out there on the internet? Coconuts Coconuts have traditionally been the main staple food in many Asian and Pacific populations. In those same populations, coconut has also long been used as a medicine to treat infections, respiratory conditions, constipation, diarrhea, indigestion, kidney stones, and other disorders. Coconut meat (the whitish flakes) is high in fiber, protein, minerals such as manganese, selenium and iron and contains Vitamin C and B vitamins along with plant sterols. Coconut meat is also high in calories from fats—the fats are primarily the saturated fats along with high amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut flour is the finely ground coconut meat. Coconut milk (pressed from coconut meat) is similar to coconut meat as far as its nutritional profile—it is high in fiber, protein, richer than coconut meat in minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium and contains Vitamins C, E and B vitamins. Coconut milk is also high in plant sterols and calories from fats. These fats are also in the saturated form with high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. Coconut water is diluted coconut milk and is much lower in calories. Finally, coconut oil is very high in calories from saturated fats and omega-6 fatty acids with essentially no vitamins, minerals, protein or fiber—in other words, pure fat. The fats in coconut oil are in the form of medium-chain triacylglycerols, or MCT. Fats and Health For many years, fats in food were considered the main cause for fats on the body. Continue reading >>

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