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Cla And Metformin

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial.

Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Metformin on Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial. Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo Liceaga-Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico. Specialized Center for Diabetes Control, Public Health Services, Mexico City, Mexico 11340. Basic Medical Sciences Department, TEC-ABC School of Medicine, Tecnolgico de Monterrey, Mexico 05300; and. School of Medicine, South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas 78539. Department of Surgery, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo Liceaga, 06726 Mexico City, Mexico. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 Jan 1;102(1):132-140. doi: 10.1210/jc.2016-2701. Context: Insulin resistance precedes metabolic syndrome abnormalities and may promote cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in children with obesity. Results of lifestyle modification programs have been discouraging, and the use of adjuvant strategies has been necessary. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of metformin and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on insulin sensitivity, measured via euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and insulin pathway expression molecules in muscle biopsies of children with obesity. Design: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. Setting: Children with obesity were randomly assigned to receive metformin, CLA, or placebo. Results: Intervention had a positive effect in all groups. For insulin sensitivity Rd value (mg/kg/min), there was a statistically significant difference between the CLA vs placebo (6.53 2.54 vs 5.05 1.46, P = 0.035). Insulinemia and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance significantly Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Conjugated Linoleic Acid And An Intervention Program With Healthy Habits In Obese Children

Metformin Vs Conjugated Linoleic Acid And An Intervention Program With Healthy Habits In Obese Children

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Metformin vs Conjugated Linoleic Acid and an Intervention Program With Healthy Habits in Obese Children The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02063802 Verified February 2014 by Laboratorios Silanes S.A. de C.V.. Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information The purpose of this clinical trial is to examine the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) vs metformin along with an intervention program with healthy habits on body composition, weight, M value in CLAMP and clinical laboratory values, as well as molecular and genetic changes in obese children. Patients from the pediatric service of the Hospital from 8 to 18 years old with a body mass index Pc 95 and 35kg/m2 are randomized to either interventional group for 4 months. Drug: metformin Dietary Supplement: Conjugated Linoleic Acid Drug: Placebo Behavioral: Healthy habits program Effect of an Intervention Program With Healthy Habits Plus Metformin or Conjugated Linoleic Acid Over Clinical Parameters and Molecular Pathways of Insulin Resistance in Obese Pediatric Patients Active Comparator: metformin and healthy habits program 1 gr per day. (250mg tablets). The patient takes 2 tablets with breakfast and 2 tablets with dinner and 2 placebo tablets with food by mouth for four months. total dose: 1 gr per day (250mg tablets). The patient takes 2 tablets with b Continue reading >>

Us20100152275a1 - Drug Or Supplement Combination With Conjugated Linoleic Acid For Fat Loss In Mammals - Google Patents

Us20100152275a1 - Drug Or Supplement Combination With Conjugated Linoleic Acid For Fat Loss In Mammals - Google Patents

US20100152275A1 - Drug or Supplement Combination with Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Fat Loss in Mammals - Google Patents Drug or Supplement Combination with Conjugated Linoleic Acid for Fat Loss in Mammals US20100152275A1 US12630681 US63068109A US2010152275A1 US 20100152275 A1 US20100152275 A1 US 20100152275A1 US 12630681 US12630681 US 12630681 US 63068109 A US63068109 A US 63068109A US 2010152275 A1 US2010152275 A1 US 2010152275A1 Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.) Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.) Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.) A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES A61K31/00Medicinal preparations containing organic active ingredients A61K31/185Acids; Anhydrides, halides or salts thereof, e.g. sulfur acids, imidic, hydrazonic, hydroximic acids A61K31/19Carboxylic acids, e.g. valproic acid A61K31/20Carboxylic acids, e.g. valproic acid having a carboxyl group bound to a chain of seven or more carbon atoms, e.g. stearic, palmitic, arachidic acids A61K31/202Carboxylic acids, e.g. valproic acid having a carboxyl group bound to a chain of seven or more carbon atoms, e.g. stearic, palmitic, arachidic acids having three or more double bonds, e.g. linolenic A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES A61K31/00Medicina

Quit Metformin And Finally Started To Lose Weight!

Quit Metformin And Finally Started To Lose Weight!

Quit Metformin and finally started to lose weight! I see that a lot of you have seen an endo doctor. Can you tell me what to expect and if there are any questions that I should ask when I see her on November 30th? Since having my uterus taken out (which was 3 times larger than it should have been)I am still experiencing a lack of interest in sex. Facial and leg hair growth have excellerated greatly. I was diagnosed with diabetes and it DOES NOT run in my family. My hormone levels are normal however my DHEA was 59. Both my gyno's refused to look at my numbers and dismiss my other symptoms with a solution of one it is your colon, and the other one's answer was bc for 2 months if still in pain let's take the ovaries. Which by the way looked good when I did the hysterectomy. My gp put me on met 500mg at night when my bg test came back as diabetes. Numbers were 148, and my vitamin D was down still so now take 50,000mg a week. So far the met does not seem to be helping with my weight. However it does seem as if my midsection is less swollen then it ever has been. So basically any help that anyone can offer is greatly appreciated. I started Metformin 6 years ago and it did take time for me to get used to it. I was nauseated a lot, and would actually get sick often times. If I "forgot" or was honestly lazy and didn't take a dose of my medicine, it would all come back to me. Once I was on the medicine and my body got used to it, it was better. I take it mainly for diabetes prevention, as I am prediabetic. It has helped me lose weight because it controls my sugar/carb cravings. It has taken time for me to get on the right dosage. I went from immediate release 500 mg a day to 2000 mg a day, and I also now take the ER/extended release version. The change to the current 2000 mg ER Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation On The Nutritional Status Of Copd Patients

The Effect Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation On The Nutritional Status Of Copd Patients

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Russell Hassan Ghobadi,1 Somaieh Matin,2 Ali Nemati,3 Abbas Naghizadeh-baghi4 1Pulmonary Division, 2Internal Medicine Department, 3Biochemistry and Nutrition Department, 4Basic Sciences Department, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran Background: COPD patients are susceptible to anorexia, reduction of caloric intake, weight loss, and malnutrition. One of the possible mechanisms is the increase of inflammatory markers such as interleukin 1 (IL1), is highly correlated with anorexia. Considering the anti-inflammatory role of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), this study aimed to investigate the effect of CLA supplementation on the nutritional status of COPD patients. Patients and methods: In a double-blind clinical trial, 93 COPD patients who volunteered to participate in the study and who filled out a written consent form, were randomly assigned to control or supplementation groups. The patients in the supplementation group received 3.2g of CLA on a daily basis for 6 weeks, while those in the control group received placebo on a daily basis for 6weeks. For IL1 assessment, the patients anthropometric indices and appetite score were checked and their blood samples were collected both before and after the treatment. Moreover, in order to investigate the changes in the caloric intake trend during the study, their dietary intake levels were assessed using 24-hour dietary recall, 3days a week at the onset, in the 4th week, and at the end of the study. Eventually, 90 patients completed the study. Results: The results demonstrated a significant increase in appetite score (P=0.001), average caloric intake (P=0.01), and macronutrient intake (P<0.05), while a significant decrease was observed in the serum level of IL1 among t Continue reading >>

Conjugated Linoleic Acid

Conjugated Linoleic Acid

View clinical references for this vitamin or supplement Sakono, M., Miyanaga, F., Kawahara, S., Yamauchi, K., Fukuda, N., Watanabe, K., Iwata, T., and Sugano, M. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid reciprocally modifies ketogenesis and lipid secretion by the rat liver. Lipids 1999;34(9):997-1000. View abstract. Sakuma, S., Nishioka, Y., Imanishi, R., Nishikawa, K., Sakamoto, H., Fujisawa, J., Wada, K., Kamisaki, Y., and Fujimoto, Y. cis9, trans11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Differentiates Mouse 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes into Mature Small Adipocytes through Induction of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor gamma. J Clin.Biochem.Nutr 2010;47(2):167-173. View abstract. Salas-Salvado, J., Marquez-Sandoval, F., and Bullo, M. Conjugated linoleic acid intake in humans: a systematic review focusing on its effect on body composition, glucose, and lipid metabolism. Crit Rev.Food Sci.Nutr. 2006;46(6):479-488. View abstract. Salva, B. K., Zumalacarregui, J. M., Figueira, A. C., Osorio, M. T., and Mateo, J. Nutrient composition and technological quality of meat from alpacas reared in Peru. Meat.Sci 2-28-2009; View abstract. Santercole, V., Mazzette, R., De Santis, E. P., Banni, S., Goonewardene, L., and Kramer, J. K. Total lipids of Sarda sheep meat that include the fatty acid and alkenyl composition and the CLA and trans-18:1 isomers. Lipids 2007;42(4):361-382. View abstract. Santillo, A., Albenzio, M., Quinto, M., Caroprese, M., Marino, R., and Sevi, A. Probiotic in lamb rennet paste enhances rennet lipolytic activity, and conjugated linoleic acid and linoleic acid content in Pecorino cheese. J Dairy Sci 2009;92(4):1330-1337. View abstract. Santillo, A., Quinto, M., Dentico, M., Muscio, A., Sevi, A., and Albenzio, M. Rennet paste from lambs fed a milk substitute supplemented with Lact Continue reading >>

A Review On Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Fatty Acid (cla) Upon Body Composition And Energetic Metabolism

A Review On Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Fatty Acid (cla) Upon Body Composition And Energetic Metabolism

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is highly found in fats from ruminants and it appears to favorably modify the body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. The capacity of CLA to reduce the body fat levels as well as its benefic actions on glycemic profile, atherosclerosis and cancer has already been proved in experimental models. Furthermore, CLA supplementation may modulate the immune function, help re-synthetize of glycogen and potentiate the bone mineralization. CLA supplementation also could increase the lipolysis and reduce the accumulation of fatty acids on the adipose tissue; the putative mechanisms involved may be its action in reducing the lipase lipoprotein activity and to increase the carnitine-palmitoil-transferase-1 (CAT-1) activity, its interaction with PPAR, and to raise the expression of UCP-1. Although studies made in human have shown some benefits of CLA supplementation as the weight loss, the results are still discordant. Moreover, some have shown adverse effects, such as negative effects on glucose metabolism and lipid profile. The purpose of this article is to review the available data regarding the benefits of CLA on the energetic metabolism and body composition, emphasizing action mechanisms. Body CompositionCarnitineConjugate Linoleic AcidBrown Adipose TissueLean Mass Although many research studies are inconclusive about functional foods, their benefits to health have often been discussed, calling the attention of the scientific community [ 1 3 ]. Thus, several studies were performed claiming that functional foods are essential for health and have helped reduce the risk of developing various chronic diseases [ 4 6 ]. This functional property concerns the metabolic or physiological rol Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

The Side Effects of Metformin can range from not so serious, to deadly, are the risks of Metformin and Glucophage side effects worth it? This page will give you information that might be able to help you decide that for yourself. Also known as Glucophage, this is an antidiabetic medicine most often used in those with Type 2 Diabetes who are also overweight. It’s also used extensively in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, a condition known as PCOS, which is often accompanied by higher blood sugar readings which often benefit from the blood sugar lowering effects of Metformin. While at first glance it seems that Side Effects of Metformin are rare, a closer look and a little math show that there are some serious problems that can occur when taking this drug, and others that can and should be prevented easily, but are usually not due to a medical community that simply does not use nutritional supplements in the prevention of even well-known, easily preventable Glucophage side effects. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency are well-known and well-studied side effects of Metformin. Despite the fact that there have been many studies confirming this problem over and over again in the medical literature, just like the Side Effects of Nitrous Oxide, few doctors warn their patients of this or recommend that they take simple, cheap over the counter Vitamin B12 Supplements in order to avoid this potentially devastating nutritional deficiency. In addition, the long term use of the ‘antacid’ drugs known as H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitors like Famotidine or Omeprazole, some of the most widely prescribed drugs, can increase this risk, as is mentioned in the Omeprazole Side Effects page. The Vitamin B12 Deficiency Symptoms range anywhere Continue reading >>

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial

Insulin resistance precedes metabolic syndrome abnormalities and may promote cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in children with obesity. Results of lifestyle modification programs have been discouraging, and the use of adjuvant strategies has been necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of metformin and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on insulin sensitivity, measured via euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp technique and insulin pathway expression molecules in muscle biopsies of children with obesity. Intervention had a positive effect in all groups. For insulin sensitivity Rd value (mg/kg/min), there was a statistically significant difference between the CLA vs placebo (6.53 ± 2.54 vs 5.05 ± 1.46, P = 0.035). Insulinemia and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance significantly improved in the CLA group (P = 0.045). After analysis of covariance was performed and the influence of body mass index, age, Tanner stage, prescribed diet, and fitness achievement was controlled, a clinically relevant effect size on insulin sensitivity remained evident in the CLA group (37%) and exceeded lifestyle program benefits. Moreover, upregulated expression of the insulin receptor substrate 2 was evident in muscle biopsies of the CLA group. Continue reading >>

Dataset | Biogps

Dataset | Biogps

Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10c12 CLA) causes dramatic reductions in white adipose tissue in mice but has had limited effectiveness in humans. Determination of the signaling pathways involved may lead to better regulation of adiposity. T10c12 CLA was found to activate AMP-activating protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of cell metabolism. Compound C, a potent inhibitor of AMPK, prevents many of the typical responses to treatments with t10c12 CLA including the integrated stress response (ISR), the inflammatory response, the reduction in key lipogenic transcription factors, and delipidation. Treatment of adipocytes or mice with t10c12 CLA in conjunction with AMPK activator metformin results in more delipidation than treatment with the individual chemicals. Additionally, the combination showed a reduced inflammatory response relative to a t10c12 CLA treatment alone. The combination of t10c12 CLA and metformin, widely used to treat insulin resistance and Type II diabetes, has potential as a treatment for reducing adiposity in humans. Keywords: control/treatment Mouse 3T3-L1 RNA for was isolated from control linoleic acid (LA) and treatment (CLA, CLA+metformin, metformin) samples for analysis on microarrays with three biological reps. Continue reading >>

Conjugated Linoleic Acid

Conjugated Linoleic Acid

Washington State, Pacific Northwest of United States Does anyone know about the fat burning benefits of supplementing with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)? When we went to the drug store to refill my metformin prescription, my wife saw a bottle of CLA pills. The blurb on the packet says it is fat burning supplement. My wife thinks she has fat to lose (which is strictly not true) and wants desperately to have a slim and trim appearance by the time we go to India on a brief vacation in the middle of next month. Of course she exercises regularly but wants something to 'accelerate' the process of fat burning. She wanted me to buy it but I said let us collect more information on CLA and then consider buying it. The pill has 800 mg of CLA extracted from safflower oil. The warning on the packet says "do not use if you are pregnant or breast-feeding." Does this drug have any adverse side effects? I googled the drug and read it up on Wikipedia but would appreciate feedback from DD members. D.D. Family T2 since 1996 and struggling to be healthy. Does anyone know about the fat burning benefits of supplementing with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)? When we went to the drug store to refill my metformin prescription, my wife saw a bottle of CLA pills. The blurb on the packet says it is fat burning supplement. My wife thinks she has fat to lose (which is strictly not true) and wants desperately to have a slim and trim appearance by the time we go to India on a brief vacation in the middle of next month. Of course she exercises regularly but wants something to 'accelerate' the process of fat burning. She wanted me to buy it but I said let us collect more information on CLA and then consider buying it. The pill has 800 mg of CLA extracted from safflower oil. The warning on the packet say Continue reading >>

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial

Effects Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid And Metformin On Insulin Sensitivity In Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial

Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Metformin on Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Children: Randomized Clinical Trial Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo LiceagaFacultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo LiceagaFacultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: Search for other works by this author on: Search for other works by this author on: Specialized Center for Diabetes Control, Public Health Services, Mexico City, Mexico 11340; Search for other works by this author on: Basic Medical Sciences Department, TEC-ABC School of Medicine, Tecnolgico de Monterrey, Mexico 05300; and Search for other works by this author on: School of Medicine, South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas 78539 Search for other works by this author on: Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo LiceagaFacultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo LiceagaFacultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Surgery, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo Liceaga, 06726 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: Department of Human Genetics, Hospital General de Mxico Eduardo LiceagaFacultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, 04510 Mexico City, Mexico; Search for other works by this author on: School o Continue reading >>

Linoleic Acid And Metformin Interaction | Treato

Linoleic Acid And Metformin Interaction | Treato

fatty acids an increased inflammatory activity deriving ... "On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 17:08:55 -0500, Jackie Patti Had anyone more luck in locating the original paper and maybe found a description of the diets' fatty compositions? With a deficit in n-3 fatty acids an increased inflammatory activity deriving from a relative surplus of linoleic acid (building arachidonic acid supporting COX-2 activity) wouldn't surprise. We mustn't forget, that this simplified macronutrient back and forth is only one aspect of the read more... /> There isn't a full paper, just an abstract. It was a poster I hadn't read Eades blog for a while. He certainly tears that paper (should I say poster?) to shreds with logic and It wasn't a peer-reviewed research paper and it wasn't the Randy, I would suggest you take the time to read Eades As far as the original version goes, this is an extract from I emailed the publicist for the University of Maryland Medical Center for an abstract of this talk, and he kindly sent it to me within minutes. (I've converted it to PDF for you: miller-2007-aha-abstract-diet.pdf.) Remember, this is all there is. Just an abstract, not a real paper. We can tell only a little about what really went on in this study. now I am continuing my Metformin, doing a low carb diet, I have secondary infertility from PCOS and have done 3 cycles, an IUI on Clomid, an IVF, and an IUI on injectables, with no successful pregnancy. Before trying ovarian drilling I am taking a few months off to lose weight and lower my BMI which is at 29.5 right now. Right now I am continuing my Metformin, doing a low carb diet, cutting out processed foods, doing cardio 4 days a week and strength training 3 times a week. So far it's been working well, I have lost 12 pounds in 3 weeks! I was read more... wonde Continue reading >>

Cla And Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Cla And Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Milk, cheese and other diary items.Photo Credit: olegkalina/iStock/Getty Images William Gamonski is a graduate of St. Francis College, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in health promotion and sciences. He was a dietetic intern at Rivington House and has been a personal trainer for the past two years. He is currently pursuing a Master of Science degree in nutrition. Dairy foods and meat contain conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). It is also available as a dietary supplement. CLA contains a mixture of different chemical forms -- or isomers -- of linoleic acid, a type of fat your body needs to function properly. Preliminary findings, based largely on animal studies, suggest that CLA may have both beneficial and harmful effects with respect to diabetes, as well as other diseases. Because of the inconsistent data, anyone with diabetes should consult their doctor before using this supplement. CLA is found naturally in milk fat and the meat of ruminants -- animals that chew their cud, like cows and sheep. The amount of CLA in these foods depends on what the animal has eaten. For example, according to an October 1999 article in the "Journal of Dairy Science," the CLA content of milk from grass-fed cows is five times higher than that from grain-fed cows. CLA is also sold as a dietary supplement. The supplements are not derived from ruminants, but are instead made by chemically altering vegetable oils. Because of this, the two sources have slightly different chemical structures. The effect of CLA on diabetes is mixed. For example, studies of rats with diabetes published in the July 2003 issue of the "American Journal of Physiology -- Endocrinology and Metabolism" and the May 2001 issue of "Diabetes" have demonstrated that CLA makes cells more responsive to insulin -- the Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of Tonalin Cla?

What Are The Dangers Of Tonalin Cla?

Kelli Cooper has been a writer since 2009, specializing in health and fitness. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rutgers University and is a certified personal trainer with the American Council on Exercise. CLA supplements might impair blood sugar control. Conjugated linolenic acid, or CLA, is a type of fatty acid naturally found in certain foods. In supplement form, it is mainly touted as a weight loss aid, but a meta-analysis of numerous studies, published in a 2005 issue of the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found it provided minimal benefit at best. While considered generally safe, some safety concerns exist. Before using Tonalin CLA or any other brand, talk to your doctor first. Studies have produced mixed evidence on whether CLA raises blood sugar levels and decreases insulin sensitivity, or how well your bodys tissues respond to this hormone trying to move sugar into them and out of the bloodstream. Given these mixed findings, it is probably a good idea to talk to your doctor before using Tonalin CLA if you have diabetes or prediabetes. A study by Irish researchers published in the October 2004 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of taking 3 grams of CLA daily for eight weeks to a placebo on the blood sugar in individuals with type 2 diabetes. They found that CLA supplementation appeared to significantly increase fasting glucose levels and decrease insulin sensitivity. A more recent study, published in the July 2007 issue of The International Journal of Obesity, found no significant differences in fasting glucose or insulin sensitivity in the treatment group compared to the placebo group. This study used a more accepted method of measuring insulin resistance than other studies. Laboratory tes Continue reading >>

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