diabetestalk.net

City Of Hope Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trials

Islet Cell Transplant Program For Diabetes Cure (clinical Trial)

Islet Cell Transplant Program For Diabetes Cure (clinical Trial)

Islet cell transplant program for Diabetes cure (clinical trial) Hi, Ive recently qualified for the islet cell transplant program at City of Hope. Im wondering if anyone in this community has participated in this program? My next step is to provide additional information to them (Auth for release of medical information and one months data from my CGM). Thank you. Ive recently qualified for the islet cell transplant program at City of Hope. I didnt recognize the name of the city. Is the study location northeast of Los Angeles near Duarte, California? Good for you for volunteering! Please keep us posted with updates. City of Hope is actually one of the research organizations Beyond Type 1 donates money to. Is this the research you will be participating? Thank-you for stepping forward !! Im curious as to how it goes and how well you cope with the anti-rejection drugs. It appears that City of Hope researchers are experimenting with regulating instead of suppressing the immune system. From @Mila s link posted above. At City of Hope, our experts are advancing breakthrough interventions that correct autoimmunity by regulating instead of suppressing the immune system. Our innovative approaches aim to restore a balanced immune system in order to stop its attack on insulin-producing beta cells. We are also endeavoring to reawaken or boost a patients remaining beta cells, or regenerate beta cells, in order to help them produce insulin on their own. These therapies represent a radical departure from traditional treatment methods that target the consequences of the disease rather than its cause (insulin insufficiency). We are also conducting research aimed at balancing the immune system by expanding and re-engineering immune cells that control and direct the fight against disease. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

City of Hope has a long and impressive history of groundbreaking discoveries in the field of diabetes. It spans more than four decades of intense investigation since RachmielLevine , M.D., who discovered the role of insulin in glucose transport, launched diabetes research at City of Hope. City of Hope's Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is headed by ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., another pioneer in the field renowned for his work on synthesizing the first man-made gene and using synthetic genes to produce human insulin. This first practical source of human insulin has largely replaced porcine- or bovine-derived insulin and has become the standard of care for diabetes worldwide. The institute, housed in the The Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Diabetes & Genetic Research Building, is comprised of the following departments and programs: The Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute's primary goals include: Understanding the genetic and molecular signaling mechanisms that lead to diabetes and its complications Advancing islet cell transplantation and related treatments for type 1 diabetes by developing better methods to prevent rejection and cure autoimmunity and by developing improved sources of islets or insulin-producing beta cells Developing drugs that precisely target the receptor molecules responsible for diabetes Studying the relationship between diabetes and cancer in order to better understand cancer etiology (and interplay at the metabolic level between these complex diseases). Specifically, developing systems biology data analysis framework to quantify and model diabetes and cancer molecular pathways Designing interventions that address molecular targets common to both diabetes and cancer, through targeted, personalized pharmacotherapy. Continue reading >>

For First Time Since Age 9, Type 1 Diabetes Patient Is Insulin-free

For First Time Since Age 9, Type 1 Diabetes Patient Is Insulin-free

Type 1 diabetes patient is insulin-free for first time in 24 years Type 1 diabetes patient Gina Marchini, shown here near her home in Palmer, Alaska, underwent an islet cell transplant at City of Hope in July. Two weeks later, she was hiking without insulin. Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 9years old, Gina Marchini accepted the fact that she would need insulin the rest of her life. Every day, she injected herself with the lifesaving hormone. She also carefully controlled her diet and monitored the rise and fall of her blood glucosewith military precision. That was before her islet cell transplant. I thought diabetes was a life sentence. Now, I'm insulin-free," said the 33-year-old kindergarten teacher from Palmer, Alaska. Even nowshe finds it hard to believe. Only hoursafter thesurgery that providedher with insulin-producing islet cells of her own,Marchini's doctors told her that her glucose levels were at normal levels. Within a few days, she was able to forgo insulin altogether. "I thought there was no way around it without my insulin shots, but now, after checking my blood sugar levels every two hours for days on end with results in the nondiabeticrange, Im starting to believe Im free, Marchini said. The results of the recently opened trial have yet to be written or even completed. But, as one of the approximately 1.25 million Americans diagnosed with type 1 diabetes , Marchini highlights the improvements and goals in diabetes research as well as the still almost inconceivable promise of a life free of needles and restrictions.{C} A pioneer in islet cell transplantation, City of Hope is using its current clinical trial to refine its transplantation protocol, which depletes disease-causing immune cells while sparing helpful immune cells. The immune-suppre Continue reading >>

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology (Photo: Business Wire) DUARTE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Some type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients can be cured from the disease, at least for a number of years, with a stem cell transplant — those were the results of a clinical trial monitored by City of Hope’s Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair, Department of Diabetes Immunology. The results were published recently in the journal, Frontiers in Immunology. Trial by @cityofhope researchers shows T1D patients cured, at least for few years, with stem cell transplant Tweet this “This means we can cure type 1 diabetes, be it with a risky therapy — although one that is also very successful in cancer, and one for which City of Hope is a world-renowned expert, with more than 13,000 patients having received similar treatment for blood cancers,” said Roep, director of The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, which aims to find a cure for T1D in six years. “We now understand stem cell transplants can succeed in treating diabetes for some, but not in others, and we can predict either outcome before the therapy is administered by ‘reading’ the immune signature of the patient with a novel nanotechnology that I developed.” An international team of researchers, including Roep, conducted the trial in Brazil. It showed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), which uses a person’s own stem cells, increases C-peptide levels — that show how much insulin is being made by the pancreas — and induces insulin independence in patients with T1D. This is possible because the transpla Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

DUARTE, Calif., Jan. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. City of Hope, which has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes, was the first to engineer synthetic human insulin by Arthur D. Riggs, Ph.D., in 1978, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world's largest home furniture manufacturer. Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, individuals and corporate and foundation partners across the country, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort, the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, that seeks to find a cure for T1D. Research results may also benefit the larger T2D population. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. "City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge," said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. "This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. "City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek family's significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, th Continue reading >>

Clinical Trial Offers Islet Cell Transplantation For Type 1 Diabetes

Clinical Trial Offers Islet Cell Transplantation For Type 1 Diabetes

A strict diet and insulin shots can't always control type 1 diabetes. What people with the immune disorder really need are insulin-producing cells of their own – currently only available through a still-experimental procedure known as islet cell transplantation. A new clinical trial at City of Hope will make that possible for some patients, with physicians in the newly launched Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope now providing this transplantation to suitable candidates. The trial, they say, could be the first step in a multipronged effort to permanently cure type 1 diabetes. The new phase I/II trial is open to adults with type 1 diabetes who have had the disease for more than five years and who experience frequent episodes of hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia unawareness, in which blood sugar drops precipitously without corresponding symptoms. Diabetic patients who have hypoglycemic unawareness are at risk of injuries and accidents, because the drop in their blood sugar can go undetected until they suddenly lose consciousness. “We are one of only a few islet cell transplant programs in the country,” said Fouad Kandeel, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Department of Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism at City of Hope, who is leading the islet cell transplantation trial. “This trial, in addition to providing a much needed potential cure for patients with severe type 1 diabetes, will also be vital in opening the door to other major studies to address the medical needs of these patients.” The goal of the trial is to further evaluate the effectiveness of transplantation as a treatment and possible cure for type 1 diabetes. Researchers also hope to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of islet cell rejection if it occurs. An improved imm Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City of Hope sets new goal for type 1 diabetes cure More than $50 million in private funding aims to cure type 1 diabetes in six years DUARTE, Calif. A cure for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hopes Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Through the generosity of the Wanek family and gifts from anonymous donors, the institution will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort that seeks to find a cure for T1D. The familys gift will establish the WanekFamilyProjectforType1Diabetes at City of Hope. City of Hope has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes . ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., conducted research in 1978 that led to the development of synthetic human insulin. Insulin is still used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which founded and currently owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the worlds largest home furniture manufacturer. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge, said RobertW.Stone , president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek familys significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, the results of which wil Continue reading >>

New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Diabetes affects over 422 million people worldwide according to the World Health Organization, but no two patients are alike. So in 2017 and beyond, treatments will increasingly make use of precision medicine to personalize treatment options. At City of Hope, researchers are using a transformative gift to speed these treatments to patients. On January 16, the Wanek family bestowed City of Hope’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute with a significant contribution to support the institution’s goal of curing type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years and create The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes. The gift follows on the heels of an alliance between City of Hope and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an organization that applies genomic analysis and bioinformatics in the development of personalized approach to therapies for diseases like cancer and diabetes. “One of the lessons we’ve had recently is that every patient is different,” said Bart Roep, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Wanek Family Project. “So you really have to do a fine diagnosis, like we do in cancer, to offer the best type of therapy to the individual patient — something we call personalized medicine, or precision medicine.” But for that, he says, researchers first need to understand what makes one T1D patient different from another. They also need to understand the mechanisms behind how the immune system mistakenly destroys beta cells — the cells that make insulin — to cause T1D. “That is what the Wanek Family Program entails, and we’re taking it from different angles,” said Roep, who is also the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and Professor and founding Chair, Department of Diabetes Immunology at City of Hope. We have people here t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes