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City Of Hope Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Curing type 1 diabetes in six years is the new goal of Duarte, Calif., based City of Hope’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Through the generosity of the Wanek family and gifts from anonymous donors, the institution will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort that seeks to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. The family’s gift will establish the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. City of Hope, which has a long history in diabetes, conducted research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin by Arthur D. Riggs, PhD, in 1978. Insulin is still used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes and 27 million with type 2 diabetes. Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, who founded and currently owns Ashley Furniture Industries. The project will create a series of highly focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing type 1 diabetes, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and CEO of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. City of Hope’s goal to cure type 1 diabetes will focus on three core areas that are crucial in treating both types of diabetes: Immune modulation – Research is already underway at City of Hope to unlock the immune system’s role in diabetes, including T cell modulation and stem cell-based therapies that may reverse the autoimmune attack on islet ce Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Gets $50 Million Gift And Goal To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In 6 Years

City Of Hope Gets $50 Million Gift And Goal To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In 6 Years

City of Hope, an independent research and treatment center for life-threatening diseases including diabetes, has been given a $50 million dollar gift for the goal of curing type 1 diabetes in 6 years. City of Hope is located in Duarte, California and is nationally renown for their work treating cancer as well as the site of developments in the areas of bone marrow transplants, diabetes, and cancer drugs. City of Hope carried out research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin by Arthur D. Riggs, Ph.D., in 1978. The monumental donation from the Wanek family and gifts from anonymous donors for the City of Hope’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute will provide $50 million to focus on a cure over the next six years. Todd Wanek, the CEO of Ashley Furniture Industries spoke on behalf of his family saying, “Our family is extremely confident that City of Hope is the institution that will find a cure for the more than 1 million Americans who battle type 1 diabetes disease every day,” The President and chief executive officer of City of Hope said in a statement, “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” and that “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” How Will They Try to Cure Type 1? The press release from City of Hope states that they plan on creating a series of “highly-focused” programs that will use an integrated approach to finding the cure since type 1 diabetes is a complex problem to solve as well as hiring world-renowned leaders and top talent to take on the challenge. The three core areas they will focus on include: Immune modulation- Bart Roep, Ph.D., who worked in the Netherlands launching a phase 1 clinical trial for a vaccine cure for Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City of Hope sets new goal for type 1 diabetes cure More than $50 million in private funding aims to cure type 1 diabetes in six years DUARTE, Calif. A cure for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hopes Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Through the generosity of the Wanek family and gifts from anonymous donors, the institution will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort that seeks to find a cure for T1D. The familys gift will establish the WanekFamilyProjectforType1Diabetes at City of Hope. City of Hope has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes . ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., conducted research in 1978 that led to the development of synthetic human insulin. Insulin is still used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which founded and currently owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the worlds largest home furniture manufacturer. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge, said RobertW.Stone , president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek familys significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, the results of which wil Continue reading >>

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology (Photo: Business Wire) DUARTE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Some type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients can be cured from the disease, at least for a number of years, with a stem cell transplant — those were the results of a clinical trial monitored by City of Hope’s Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair, Department of Diabetes Immunology. The results were published recently in the journal, Frontiers in Immunology. Trial by @cityofhope researchers shows T1D patients cured, at least for few years, with stem cell transplant Tweet this “This means we can cure type 1 diabetes, be it with a risky therapy — although one that is also very successful in cancer, and one for which City of Hope is a world-renowned expert, with more than 13,000 patients having received similar treatment for blood cancers,” said Roep, director of The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, which aims to find a cure for T1D in six years. “We now understand stem cell transplants can succeed in treating diabetes for some, but not in others, and we can predict either outcome before the therapy is administered by ‘reading’ the immune signature of the patient with a novel nanotechnology that I developed.” An international team of researchers, including Roep, conducted the trial in Brazil. It showed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), which uses a person’s own stem cells, increases C-peptide levels — that show how much insulin is being made by the pancreas — and induces insulin independence in patients with T1D. This is possible because the transpla Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

DUARTE, Calif., Jan. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. City of Hope, which has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes, was the first to engineer synthetic human insulin by Arthur D. Riggs, Ph.D., in 1978, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world's largest home furniture manufacturer. Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, individuals and corporate and foundation partners across the country, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort, the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, that seeks to find a cure for T1D. Research results may also benefit the larger T2D population. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. "City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge," said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. "This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. "City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek family's significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, th Continue reading >>

Top 5 T1d Research Center Profile: City Of Hope

Top 5 T1d Research Center Profile: City Of Hope

This is the first in a series of reports on the top five largest T1D research centers in the U.S. It will feature a profile of the City of Hope (COH) Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, located in California. In addition to our initial profile, last week the JDCA attended a COH sponsored research symposium and met with Dr. Bart Roep, the Founding Chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology and Dr. Debbie Thurmond, Chair of the Department of Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology at COH to discuss institution goals and research. Several other notable researchers were in attendance, including but not limited to, Doug Melton, Ed Damiano, Jane Reusch (the ADA president-elect), and Mark Atkinson (Head of the JDRF Research Advisory Committee and Professor at the University of Florida). Earlier this year, the JDCA published a report on a significant $50m donation to COH, which catapulted COH into a position of being one of the most well-funded institutions working on T1D in the country (click here to view). As part of the gift, COH established the Wanek Family Project to Cure Type 1 Diabetes and set a bold goal of curing type 1 diabetes within six years. COH Structure and T1D Research Pathways City of Hope first established a Division of Diabetes in 1971. It has continued to explore diabetes-related research topics for the past five decades with the goal of understanding the disease, advancing islet cell transplantation, developing drugs, and studying the relationship between diabetes and cancer. It is comprised of six major departments (T1 and T2 focused), including most recently The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, led by Roep. The Wanek Project pursues four main research pathways and the division of the $50m gift across the core focus areas is dependent upon p Continue reading >>

Islet Cell Transplant Program For Diabetes Cure (clinical Trial)

Islet Cell Transplant Program For Diabetes Cure (clinical Trial)

Islet cell transplant program for Diabetes cure (clinical trial) Hi, Ive recently qualified for the islet cell transplant program at City of Hope. Im wondering if anyone in this community has participated in this program? My next step is to provide additional information to them (Auth for release of medical information and one months data from my CGM). Thank you. Ive recently qualified for the islet cell transplant program at City of Hope. I didnt recognize the name of the city. Is the study location northeast of Los Angeles near Duarte, California? Good for you for volunteering! Please keep us posted with updates. City of Hope is actually one of the research organizations Beyond Type 1 donates money to. Is this the research you will be participating? Thank-you for stepping forward !! Im curious as to how it goes and how well you cope with the anti-rejection drugs. It appears that City of Hope researchers are experimenting with regulating instead of suppressing the immune system. From @Mila s link posted above. At City of Hope, our experts are advancing breakthrough interventions that correct autoimmunity by regulating instead of suppressing the immune system. Our innovative approaches aim to restore a balanced immune system in order to stop its attack on insulin-producing beta cells. We are also endeavoring to reawaken or boost a patients remaining beta cells, or regenerate beta cells, in order to help them produce insulin on their own. These therapies represent a radical departure from traditional treatment methods that target the consequences of the disease rather than its cause (insulin insufficiency). We are also conducting research aimed at balancing the immune system by expanding and re-engineering immune cells that control and direct the fight against disease. Continue reading >>

Experimental Treatment At City Of Hope Could Be Cure To Type 1 Diabetes

Experimental Treatment At City Of Hope Could Be Cure To Type 1 Diabetes

DUARTE (CBSLA.com) — Five months after Susan Weinberg’s wedding, her diabetes became so severe that even eight shots of insulin a day could not prevent a horrific car accident. “I was lucky I didn’t kill myself or kill someone else,” said Weinberg. Soon, her low blood sugar episodes knocked her unconscious daily. She couldn’t be left alone for years. “I became a prisoner in my own body,” she said. “I never knew when it was happening, and I was always afraid.” So afraid, she was willing to try something experimental. She became the first patient in a Type 1 diabetes clinical trial at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte. Dr. Fouad Kandeel, an endocrinologist, gave Susan two islet-cell transplants, a short outpatient procedure, similar to an organ transplant, that replaces cells inside the patient’s pancreas. “I’m very excited. This is a cure in the making,” Kandeel said. “It is personalized, customized therapy for what the patient needs.” Kandeel showed CBS2/KCAL9’s Erica Nochlin images of Weinberg’s wild blood glucose levels before the transplant, compared with how stable they became right after. He said the key was inside the pancreas, where cells produce insulin in healthy patients. But in diabetic patients, those islet cells die. Therefore, insulin cannot be produced. Kendeel can now transplant those dead islet cells with new living cells, reducing Weinberg’s insulin shots to zero. “It was like freedom!” said Weinberg. “It was like I could drive a car. I could go to the market. I could sit at a park with a book and not worry I was going to be found slumped over the pages of the book.” And the results lasted longer than expected. Weinberg lived needle-free for more than 10 years. It was just recently that she Continue reading >>

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could A Vaccine Be The End Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Could a Vaccine Be the End of Type 1 Diabetes? A doctor at City of Hope in Duarte is working on a revolutionary cure If the human body were like the economy, your blood sugar would be the local currency. Its value should be stable like the dollar, but type 1 diabetes makes it boomerang like Bitcoin. Sugar too high? You could go into a coma. Too low and you could die in your sleep. Its a horrible disease, says Dutch immunologist Bart Roep. The symptoms often manifest in childhood, and if you are diagnosed before age five, your prognosis is worse than if you had leukemia, he adds. Determined to improve those odds, Roep left the Netherlands to join City of Hope hospital in Duarte in 2016 and now leads a project with the goal of curing type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years. Such a tight timetable may sound, at best, ambitious, but City of Hope backs it with a $50 million grant and plenty of academic street cred. Although better known for its cancer treatment, the institution benefits from a legacy of pioneering diabetes research dating to the 1970s, when two of its scientists helped develop the first synthetic human insulin, the protein that regulates blood sugar. That insulin, which T1D patients must administer daily via syringes or pumps, has saved millions of lives, but it sheds no light on the diseases origins. An autoimmune disorder, T1D arises when the immune system lays siege to the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. (This is quite different from type 2 diabetes, which usually appears later in life, doesnt involve the immune system, and is linked to lifestyle issues like obesity.) About 1.5 million Americans are affected by T1D, and the search for the root cause has turned up a skein of possible hereditary and environmental factors. For example, although more tha Continue reading >>

City Of Hope's New Approach Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope's New Approach Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

CITY OF HOPE SETS NEW GOAL FOR TYPE 1 DIABETES CURE More than $50 million in private funding aims to cure Type 1 diabetes in six years A recent grouping of donations totaling $50 million is outstanding, those in the trenches with diabetes said. But only six years to a cure? Really? You lost us there, some claimed. Dr. Bart Roep, Ph.D., director of the program, now known as the Wanek Family Project at City of Hope, understands that view. Some people give up [on hope for a cure], and I respect that, he said. He admits, too, that six years is a goal, not a promise. I cannot be confident in the six years, he said. If I knew what was needed to do that, Id do it on one year. But, he feels the pathway City of Hope has laid out thanks to the donations leads the diabetes world on a road to better outcomes, and a place that, in six years, will be significantly better than where we are today. What the program plans to do is change the entire way we view a cure, shifting from a one-size-fits-all method of research and goals to a system of precision medicine; a way to offer individualized and personalized therapies for people with diabetes much in the same way cancer treatment does today. The program will draw heavily from a biorepository, something Dr. Roep says will save millions of dollars and many years in helping them embrace the concept of diabetes being unique in almost every individual. Armed with that knowledge they will dig back into human clinical studies that may not have succeeded on a mass scale and look to see if they can help patients on a smaller scale. For instance, if a study failed for 70 percent of the participants, it may have held answers for other 30 percent. The focus at City of Hope will be threefold: to stop the progression of the disease (something Dr. R Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Receives $50 Million To End Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Receives $50 Million To End Diabetes In Six Years

Home News City of Hope Receives $50 Million to End Diabetes in Six... City of Hope Receives $50 Million to End Diabetes in Six Years City of Hope in Duarte, California, has announced gifts totaling $50 million in support of an initiative at its Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute to develop a cure for type 1 diabetes. Led by a gift from Todd Wanek, CEO of Ashley Furniture , the world's largest home furniture manufacturer, and his family, the gifts will support the institute's Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes , an effort to create highly focused programs aimed at attacking the problem of T1D in novel ways, with the ultimate goal of finding a cure within six years. To that end, the project will focus on three areas, each of which is crucial in treating both type 1 and type 2 diabetes: immune modulation, beta cell expansion and replacement, and preventing diabetes complications. The $50 million total also includes gifts from an anonymous donor, individual supporters, and corporate and foundation partners. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes. "City of Hope scientists' research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes," said Wanek. "It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease." Unable to update subscription. please try again later. How would you characterize your economic prospects? Unable to update subscription. please try again later. Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

City of Hope has a long and impressive history of groundbreaking discoveries in the field of diabetes. It spans more than four decades of intense investigation since RachmielLevine , M.D., who discovered the role of insulin in glucose transport, launched diabetes research at City of Hope. City of Hope's Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is headed by ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., another pioneer in the field renowned for his work on synthesizing the first man-made gene and using synthetic genes to produce human insulin. This first practical source of human insulin has largely replaced porcine- or bovine-derived insulin and has become the standard of care for diabetes worldwide. The institute, housed in the The Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Diabetes & Genetic Research Building, is comprised of the following departments and programs: The Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute's primary goals include: Understanding the genetic and molecular signaling mechanisms that lead to diabetes and its complications Advancing islet cell transplantation and related treatments for type 1 diabetes by developing better methods to prevent rejection and cure autoimmunity and by developing improved sources of islets or insulin-producing beta cells Developing drugs that precisely target the receptor molecules responsible for diabetes Studying the relationship between diabetes and cancer in order to better understand cancer etiology (and interplay at the metabolic level between these complex diseases). Specifically, developing systems biology data analysis framework to quantify and model diabetes and cancer molecular pathways Designing interventions that address molecular targets common to both diabetes and cancer, through targeted, personalized pharmacotherapy. Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes

City Of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes

City of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause of Type 1 Diabetes Study results challenge traditional ideas about the source of this life-altering disease Newswise DUARTE, Calif. An international team of researchers led by City of Hopes Bart Roep , Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology, has been able to justify an alternative theory about the cause of type 1 diabetes (T1D) through experimental work. The study results were published online today in the journal Nature Medicine.T1D, previously known as juvenile diabetes, affects an estimated 1.5 million Americans and is the result of the loss of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. The prevailing belief was that the root cause of T1D was the immune system mistakenly identifying those insulin-secreting beta cells as a potential danger and, in turn, destroying them. Now Roep, along with researchers from the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, have found a mechanism in which stressed beta cells are actually causing the immune response that leads to T1D. Our findings show that type 1 diabetes results from a mistake of the beta cell, not a mistake of the immune system, said Roep, who is director of The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes , which was recently created with gifts from the Wanek family and anonymous donors to support the institutions goal of curing T1D in six years. The immune system does what it is supposed to do, which is respond to distressed or 'unhappy' tissue, as it would in infection or cancer. In order to gain a better understanding of why the immune system attacks the bodys own source of insulin the pancreatic beta cells in the islets of Langerhans the team took some clues f Continue reading >>

Bart Roep, Ph.d., Has Type 1 Diabetes Cure In His Sights

Bart Roep, Ph.d., Has Type 1 Diabetes Cure In His Sights

Bart Roep, Ph.D., Has Type 1 Diabetes Cure in His Sights Bart O. Roep, Ph.D., has dedicated his life to the search for a cure for type 1 diabetes. And he thinks he is on the brink. Roep, an internationally renowned immunologist who joined City of Hope last year from the Netherlands Leiden University Medical Center, was recently named the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes. He believes that this endowment and a $50 million funding project led by the Wanek family will be key in stopping the disease. We need to do something in addition to treating the symptoms, Roep said. Diabetes has surpassed cancer as a cause of death. One of the goals of the diabetes program at City of Hope is to accelerate the progress against the disease. And the new $50-million grant is a catalyst to get there faster. Instead of dealing with the effects of the disease, Roep is committed to treating the disease itself. For 100 years, weve known how to deal with the symptoms, he said. Now, for the first time, we can tackle the cause. This is really one of the most exciting times since the discovery of insulin. We have the opportunity to offer a completely new generation of therapy to these patients. After studying the mechanism of type 1 diabetes for the last two decades, Roep, the founding chair of the DepartmentofDiabetesImmunology within the Diabetes&MetabolismResearchInstituteatCityofHope , recently had his Eureka! moment when he realized that the disorder varies greatly from patient to patient. One of the new insights is that diabetes is very diverse, he said. Based on that understanding, a key component of Roeps current research is to understand the differences in disease between patients, and accordingly tailor the type of immune strategy that we offer them. Roep explaine Continue reading >>

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