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City Of Hope Diabetes Center

Diabetes Institute At City Of Hope Will Speed Research

Diabetes Institute At City Of Hope Will Speed Research

To speed diabetes treatments, City of Hope unveils new diabetes institute As diabetes experts worldwide know, City of Hope has alongstanding commitment to combating diabetes, a leading national and global health threat. Now that commitment has led to a $60 million investment to expand basic and translational research efforts through thenew Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope. The new Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope will further research into diabetes. The diabetesinstitute will expand the existing diabetes program, already credited with important discoveries in the understanding and treatment of diabetes. With an estimated one in three people in the U.S. projected to be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050, the need for diabetes research has never been more crucial. Millions of diabetes patients worldwide depend on synthetic insulin, a medical breakthrough with its roots at City of Hope, said Steven T. Rosen, M.D ., Irell& Manella Cancer Center Directors Distinguished Chair, provost and chief scientific officer. The institute will accelerate our efforts to discover new treatments and potential cures for this serious health threat. We will push forward in epigenetics, immunology, developmental biology, translational medicine, obesity, nutrition and metabolism all fields that will be integral in developing cures for diabetes. Arthur Riggs, Ph.D ., will serve as director of the institute, with FouadKandeel, M.D., Ph.D. , serving as associate director. The institute will initially include four basic science and translational research departments: Diabetes Complications, Obesity and Metabolism; Diabetes Immunology; Developmental Biology; and Translational Research and Cellular Therapeutics; as well as one clinical department, Clinica Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes

City Of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes

City of Hope Researchers Discover New Potential Cause of Type 1 Diabetes Study results challenge traditional ideas about the source of this life-altering disease Newswise DUARTE, Calif. An international team of researchers led by City of Hopes Bart Roep , Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology, has been able to justify an alternative theory about the cause of type 1 diabetes (T1D) through experimental work. The study results were published online today in the journal Nature Medicine.T1D, previously known as juvenile diabetes, affects an estimated 1.5 million Americans and is the result of the loss of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. The prevailing belief was that the root cause of T1D was the immune system mistakenly identifying those insulin-secreting beta cells as a potential danger and, in turn, destroying them. Now Roep, along with researchers from the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, have found a mechanism in which stressed beta cells are actually causing the immune response that leads to T1D. Our findings show that type 1 diabetes results from a mistake of the beta cell, not a mistake of the immune system, said Roep, who is director of The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes , which was recently created with gifts from the Wanek family and anonymous donors to support the institutions goal of curing T1D in six years. The immune system does what it is supposed to do, which is respond to distressed or 'unhappy' tissue, as it would in infection or cancer. In order to gain a better understanding of why the immune system attacks the bodys own source of insulin the pancreatic beta cells in the islets of Langerhans the team took some clues f Continue reading >>

Department Of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism

Department Of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism

Department of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism The Department of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism, directed by Rama Natarajan, Ph.D., is at the forefront of research on the complications of diabetes, metabolic diseases. This department within the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute (DMRI) uses state-of-the-art computational and systems biology data-analysis methods, genomic and epigenomic profiling approaches; novel transgenic mouse models; and translational approaches with small molecules and modified nucleotides in animal models and humans in its quest to advance the field of diabetes, obesity, diabetic complications and metabolic diseases research. Several investigators are examining the role of epigenetic mechanisms in these pathologies. Researchers are also studying the molecular links between diabetes, obesity and cancer, and mechanisms by which aberrant metabolism leads to cancer. The Department offers scientists and trainees a multidisciplinary environment in these scientific research areas. They work collaboratively not only with faculty within the Department, but also those within the DMRI and the BRI at City of Hope, as well as nationally and internationally towards a common goal of reducing the burden of diabetes, metabolic diseases and their debilitating complications. Rama Natarajan Ph.D., FAHA, FASN: Battling Diabetic Complications: Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure and a significant risk factor for other complications such as atherosclerosis. Dr. Natarajan is working to determine molecular mechanisms and factors driving these complications and to develop strategies to prevent and reverse these complications. Her laboratory studies the role of epigenetics and non-coding RNAs (including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs) in these Continue reading >>

Friends United - For Juvenile Diabetes Research

Friends United - For Juvenile Diabetes Research

Friends United is pleased to have helped fund the following important diabetes research at these prestigious institutions. City of Hope Diabetes Research Center, Duarte, CA Ongoing projects at the Diabetes Research Center focus on halting, reversing, and preventing the autoimmune processes responsible for type 1 diabetes through several state-of-the-art approaches. The work of the Immune Modulation Program is central to the mission of curing type 1 diabetes and will impact forward progress in both the Cell Therapy Program and the Renewable Cell Source (Stem Cell) Program. Read more Kovler Diabetes Center, University of Chicago The University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center, a national leader in comprehensive diabetes care and research, is committed to finding new therapies for diabetes that may someday even lead to a cure for the disease. They are currently developing a promising new approach with the goal of discovering how stem cells grown from adults can be taught to make insulin and used to better understand how to treat diabetes. The technical term for these cells is induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and there is no doubt they can help teach researchers how the beta cells that secret insulin in the body work. These adult stem cells are made from skin biopsies of adults or children (not human embryos). With the current knowledge of genetic engineering, these skin cells can be turned into the iPSC stem cells that are capable of becoming almost any function-specific cell in the body. The challenge is discovering how to do it efficiently, get the process scaled up, and deal with potential downsides including rejection by the body's immune system. Read more Yogish C. Kudva, MBBS, is conducting "A Multiple-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Pa Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

Diabetes Immunology At City Of Hope's Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute | Los Angeles | Southern California

Diabetes Immunology At City Of Hope's Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute | Los Angeles | Southern California

The Department of Diabetes Immunology, headed by BartO.Roep,Ph.D ., is dedicated to studying immune system mechanisms and their impact on diabetes development and control particularly type 1 diabetes, which is triggered by an autoimmune reaction against a persons own insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. A better understanding of these mechanisms can lead to better prevention, detection and treatment strategies for people with, or at-risk for, type 1 diabetes, significantly improving their clinical outcomes and quality of life while reducing the risk of serious complications. The newly-formed department within the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute will utilize a multidisciplinary and highly translational approach to study all facets of immune system function and its impact on beta cells. This includes close collaboration with other departments within the institute, as well as with basic and translational scientists in BeckmanResearchInstituteofCityofHope and physicians in CityofHopeclinics . Roep and his team hope that this synergistic relationship will rapidly transform promising findings into novel interventions for type 1 diabetes. Identifying genetic risk factors: Previous studies show that numerous genes affect type 1 diabetes risk, Roep and his team are currently studying approximately 40 genes with the greatest relevance and how variations in these genes impact immune system sensitivity, type 1 diabetes development and efficacy of different intervention therapies. Successful identification and screening of these gene variations can lead to better prevention and early detection strategies for populations at greatest risk of developing this disease, as well as finding the most effective treatments available for each patient's disease. Understanding Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute

City of Hope has a long and impressive history of groundbreaking discoveries in the field of diabetes. It spans more than four decades of intense investigation since RachmielLevine , M.D., who discovered the role of insulin in glucose transport, launched diabetes research at City of Hope. City of Hope's Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is headed by ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., another pioneer in the field renowned for his work on synthesizing the first man-made gene and using synthetic genes to produce human insulin. This first practical source of human insulin has largely replaced porcine- or bovine-derived insulin and has become the standard of care for diabetes worldwide. The institute, housed in the The Leslie & Susan Gonda (Goldschmied) Diabetes & Genetic Research Building, is comprised of the following departments and programs: The Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute's primary goals include: Understanding the genetic and molecular signaling mechanisms that lead to diabetes and its complications Advancing islet cell transplantation and related treatments for type 1 diabetes by developing better methods to prevent rejection and cure autoimmunity and by developing improved sources of islets or insulin-producing beta cells Developing drugs that precisely target the receptor molecules responsible for diabetes Studying the relationship between diabetes and cancer in order to better understand cancer etiology (and interplay at the metabolic level between these complex diseases). Specifically, developing systems biology data analysis framework to quantify and model diabetes and cancer molecular pathways Designing interventions that address molecular targets common to both diabetes and cancer, through targeted, personalized pharmacotherapy. Continue reading >>

$50 Million In Donations To City Of Hope Aim For Diabetes Cure In 6 Years

$50 Million In Donations To City Of Hope Aim For Diabetes Cure In 6 Years

DUARTE — More than $50 million in private funding has the City of Hope research and treatment center setting the lofty goal today of curing Type 1 diabetes in six years. The funding was donated to the hospital’s Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute in part by the Wanek family, which controls Ashley Furniture, and some anonymous private benefactors. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, CEO of Ashley Furniture. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease. Our family is extremely confident that City of Hope is the institution that will find a cure for the more than 1 million Americans who battle type 1 diabetes disease every day.” City of Hope officials said The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes will create several programs that will seek a cure through immunotherapy approaches and research into beta cell transplantation. In 1978, one of City of Hope’s researchers, Arthur D. Riggs, developed a synthetic human insulin used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with Type 1 diabetes and 27 million with Type 2 diabetes. “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and CEO of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” He added, “City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek family’s significant gift that will enable the institution to forward Fype 1 diabetes research, the results of which will have worldwide impact. We invite others to join the Wanek family and City of Hope as we continue to move even closer to a cure for Type 1 diabetes.” Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City of Hope sets new goal for type 1 diabetes cure More than $50 million in private funding aims to cure type 1 diabetes in six years DUARTE, Calif. A cure for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hopes Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Through the generosity of the Wanek family and gifts from anonymous donors, the institution will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort that seeks to find a cure for T1D. The familys gift will establish the WanekFamilyProjectforType1Diabetes at City of Hope. City of Hope has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes . ArthurD.Riggs , Ph.D., conducted research in 1978 that led to the development of synthetic human insulin. Insulin is still used today by an estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which founded and currently owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the worlds largest home furniture manufacturer. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge, said RobertW.Stone , president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek familys significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, the results of which wil Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Sets New Goal For Type 1 Diabetes Cure

DUARTE, Calif., Jan. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in six years is the new goal of City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. City of Hope, which has a long and groundbreaking history in diabetes, was the first to engineer synthetic human insulin by Arthur D. Riggs, Ph.D., in 1978, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, (T1D) and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Funding for this transformative research is being led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world's largest home furniture manufacturer. Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, individuals and corporate and foundation partners across the country, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an innovative research effort, the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, that seeks to find a cure for T1D. Research results may also benefit the larger T2D population. The project will create a series of highly-focused programs based at City of Hope that will use an integrated approach to curing T1D, including immunotherapy approaches, as well as research into beta cell transplantation and preventing the body from rejecting those insulin secreting cells. "City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge," said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. "This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes. "City of Hope is extremely grateful for the Wanek family's significant gift that will enable the institution to forward type 1 diabetes research, th Continue reading >>

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Researchers Study Cure For Type 1 Diabetes In Stem Cell Transplantations

Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair of the Department of Diabetes Immunology (Photo: Business Wire) DUARTE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Some type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients can be cured from the disease, at least for a number of years, with a stem cell transplant — those were the results of a clinical trial monitored by City of Hope’s Bart Roep, Ph.D., the Chan Soon-Shiong Shapiro Distinguished Chair in Diabetes and professor/founding chair, Department of Diabetes Immunology. The results were published recently in the journal, Frontiers in Immunology. Trial by @cityofhope researchers shows T1D patients cured, at least for few years, with stem cell transplant Tweet this “This means we can cure type 1 diabetes, be it with a risky therapy — although one that is also very successful in cancer, and one for which City of Hope is a world-renowned expert, with more than 13,000 patients having received similar treatment for blood cancers,” said Roep, director of The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes, which aims to find a cure for T1D in six years. “We now understand stem cell transplants can succeed in treating diabetes for some, but not in others, and we can predict either outcome before the therapy is administered by ‘reading’ the immune signature of the patient with a novel nanotechnology that I developed.” An international team of researchers, including Roep, conducted the trial in Brazil. It showed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), which uses a person’s own stem cells, increases C-peptide levels — that show how much insulin is being made by the pancreas — and induces insulin independence in patients with T1D. This is possible because the transpla Continue reading >>

Hidden History: Legacy Of Diabetes Care At City Of Hope

Hidden History: Legacy Of Diabetes Care At City Of Hope

Hidden History: Legacy of Diabetes Care at City of Hope City of Hopes Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. But it's natural to wonder: Why would a cancer center be the recipient of such a transformative gift? Believe it or not, City of Hope widely known as a center for cancer care and research is the home of one of the most influential diabetes research programs in the world. There is a hidden history of diabetes at City of Hope that needs to be told, said FouadKandeel,M.D.,Ph.D. , chair of the departments of Translational Research and Cellular Therapeutics, and Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, director of the IsletCellTransplantProgram and associate director of the Diabetes&MetabolismResearchInstitute at City of Hope. Were a powerhouse that is not as well-known as we should be. According to ArthurRiggs,Ph.D. , the Samuel Rahbar Chair in Diabetes & Drug Discovery, director of the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope and director emeritus of Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, the organization has been a major player in diabetes research since it first established a Division of Diabetes in the early 1970s. He should know back in 1978, Riggs, along with KeiichiItakura,Ph.D. , professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, conducted research that led to the development of synthetic human insulin. Weve made tremendous advances in the field of diabetes research, starting with the work of Rachmiel Levine, said Riggs. Arthur Riggs, Ph.D., and Keiichi Itakura, Ph.D., in 1978 The late Levine, a physician and former executive medical director at City of Hope wrote the book on diabete Continue reading >>

City Of Hope National Medical Center

City Of Hope National Medical Center

City of Hope is a private, not-for-profit clinical research center, hospital and graduate medical school located in Duarte, California, United States. The center's main campus resides on 110 acre of land adjacent to the boundaries of Duarte and Irwindale, with a network of clinical practice locations throughout Southern California, satellite offices in Monrovia and Irwindale, and regional fundraising offices throughout the United States. City of Hope is best known as a cancer treatment center. It has been designated a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute. City of Hope has also been ranked one of the nation's Best Cancer Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report for over ten years and is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. City of Hope played a role in the development of synthetic human insulin in 1978. The center has performed 13,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplants as of 2016 with patient outcomes that consistently exceed national averages.[citation needed] History[edit] City of Hope Los Angeles City of Hope - Duarte (Los Angeles County, California) In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the spread of tuberculosis, also known as "consumption," was a growing concern in the United States and Europe. Owing to advancements in the scientific understanding of its contagious nature, a movement to house and quarantine sufferers became prevalent. Construction of tuberculosis sanatoria, including tent cities, became common in the United States, with many sanatoriums located in the Southwestern United States, where it was believed that the more arid climate would aid sufferers. In 1913, the Jewish Consumptive Relief Association was chartered in Los Angeles, California, with the intent of raising money to establish a free, non Continue reading >>

Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism

Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism The Department of Clinical Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism offers a unique diabetes and endocrinology program combining groundbreaking research, innovative treatments with comprehensive patient education to help people living with diabetes and other endocrine diseases get the medical care and information they need to achieve optimal quality of life. Treatment is tailored to the individual, with the type of disease and its severity determining the optimal course of treatment. City of Hope patients can also enroll in a clinical trial for novel, promising therapies that are not available elsewhere. The department also provides care and conducts research for other endocrinology and metabolic disorders, including: Diagnosing and treating endocrine system malignancies (e.g. cancer or tumor in pituitary , thyroid , pancreatic , ovarian , testicular and neuroendocrine tissue) Preventing and managing hormone-related side effects that can arise from cancer treatments Treating sexual dysfunction due to hormonal imbalance or disorder Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Marshals $50 Million Toward Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City Of Hope Marshals $50 Million Toward Type 1 Diabetes Cure

City of Hope has an ambitious new goal: Find a cure for Type 1 diabetes in the next six years. The independent research center, which also studies and treats cancer, announced its plan Monday. They've got a good start, too, thanks to more than $50 million they've received in private funding. Type 1 diabetes causes the immune system to attack cells that make insulin. It affects 1 in 200 people in the United States. The key to a cure will lie in understanding what causes the disease, according to Dr. Bart Roep, director of City of Hope's research team. From there, researchers can begin to develop therapies, which can vary from person to person. "[It's] something we call personalized medicine or precision medicine, which is very much in vogue in cancer. That means we need to understand where patients differ and then tailor the immune therapies to their specific needs," Roep said. The funding comes from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture, and anonymous donors, according to City of Hope. The Waneks have donated to the center for about 20 years, but this was the first time they've specified how money should be used. Continue reading >>

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