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Cities With Highest Diabetes Rate

The Best (and Worst) States For Diabetes

The Best (and Worst) States For Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. The United States is experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Since 2008, the number of Americans with diabetes has risen by 2.2 million people, and the rate has increased rapidly with growing obesity. Yet some states appear to be faring better than others. On Wednesday, Gallup and Healthways released a new report ranking states and communities on incidence of diabetes for 2015. The new report shows Utah, Rhode Island and Colorado have the lowest incidence of diabetes in the United States. In each of those states, less than 8% of the population has diabetes. That’s significantly different than the rates reported in other states. For instance, Alabama and West Virginia have the highest number of people with diabetes in their state, with over 16% of the population with a diabetes diagnosis. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now The researchers cite the obesity epidemic as one of the greatest contributing factors to the high rates of diabetes in the U.S. More than a third of American adults are obese. “While not all people with diabetes are obese, and not all who are obese develop diabetes, research shows that about 54% of middle aged Americans who are obese and have not yet developed diabetes will do so in their lifetime,” the report authors write. The study authors also looked at specific communities within states for a deeper picture on what regions of the nation are doing well, and which communities need some work. They found that Boulder, Colo., Bellingham, Wash., Fort Collins, Colo., and Provo-Orem, Utah report the lowest incidence rates out of cities nationwide. Boulder is especially low with less than 5% of people in the city diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Countries With The Highest Rates Of Diabetes

Countries With The Highest Rates Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) due to insufficient secretion of insulin or insensitivity to this hormone. High levels of blood sugar can lead to severe consequences, including organ failure, loss of sight, neuropathy, coma, and even death. Stress, inactivity, nutritionally-poor and energy-dense diets, and being obese are not only correlated one with another, but can also work either independently or interdependently to decrease the human body’s ability to secrete insulin and its sensitivity to its actions. 10. New Caledonia (20%) The nation of New Caledonia consists of a number of small islands in the South Pacific Ocean. In 1999, this country, located just east of the continent of Australia, was afforded the status of being a "special collectivity" of France. With roots dating back to the days of French colonialism, the current populace is made up of a mix of Kanak (the indigenous people of New Caledonia), Europeans, and Polynesians, as well as many of Southeast Asian descent. Perhaps one of the reasons behind the country's high rate of diabetes is its limited domestic agricultural industry, which has resulted in making it harder for local residents of this tropical locale to have adequate access to a varied, healthy diet. 9. Mauritius (21%) The small country of Mauritius, with a population of just over one million people, is located just off the coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean. Despite being described as a virtual tropical paradise by both locals and tourists alike, Mauritius isn’t immune to the worldwide epidemic of rising rates of diabetes. Key among the known risk factors for this chronic disease are smoking and being overweight. According to 2014 statistics from the World Health Organization, almost forty Continue reading >>

Mexico Diabetes Rates Contend For World's Worst

Mexico Diabetes Rates Contend For World's Worst

Mexico diabetes rates contend for world's worst MEXICO CITY -- On World Diabetes Day, Mexico bears a dubious distinction: The country has the second highest rate of diabetes after the United States. MEXICO CITY -- Mexico stands out on World Diabetes Day, Nov. 14, for its dubious distinction of having one of the world's highest rates of the disease, ranking second only to the United States. Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico. An obesity epidemic here is blamed for the high rate of the disease, which affects 24 percent of men and 21 percent of women over the age of 35 years, according to the World Health Organization. Mexico's health secretariat estimates that 90 percent of the cases of Type 2 diabetes in the country can be attributed to being overweight or obese. Doctors and nutritionists blame the obesity epidemic on changing patterns of eating as Mexico modernizes. People are eating more fast foods and drinking more soft drinks. In fact, Mexicans consume more soft drinks than people in any other country, chugging down 43 gallons per capita versus 31 gallons per capita in the U.S, the world's No. 2 consumer, according to Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Children are at special risk in Mexico, which also has the world's highest rate of childhood obesity. More than 28 percent of children between ages 5 and 9, and 38 percent of preteens and teenagers ages 10 to 19, suffer from excess weight or obesity, according to Mexico's Social Security Institute. At food stands, where busy Mexicans eat a quick breakfast of warm tamales or quesadillas or grab tacos or tortas for lunch, soft drinks or sugary juices are the frequent accompaniment. Whether on the crowded streets of Mexico City or on back roads in rural areas, cases of glass-bottled Continue reading >>

States With The Highest (and Lowest) Diabetes Rates

States With The Highest (and Lowest) Diabetes Rates

States With the Highest (and Lowest) Diabetes Rates is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC. States With the Highest (and Lowest) Diabetes Rates Since 2008, the number of Americans living with diabetes increased by nearly 2.2 million people. But a new report shows that some states and communities are faring much better than others. According to study authors, rising rates of obesity are largely to blame for this surge in the epidemic, Time.com reports . For the study, researchers with the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series conducted almost 180,000 telephone interviews with adults about their health in 2015 throughout all 50 states. Scientists also targeted specific communities in these states to get a more definitive look at which regions of the country were best battling this widespread blood sugar disorder. Researchers interviewed an extra 246,620 people to gather data about the communities. Findings showed that Utah, Rhode Island and Colorado were the three states with the lowest incidence of diabetes. Each of these states reported that less than 8 percent of the population suffered from the condition. More specifically, Boulder, Colorado; Bellingham, Washington; and Fort Collins, Colorado were the three healthiest cities on the nationwide diabetes ranking. Conversely, researchers found that Alabama, West Virginia and Mississippi had the highest numbers of people living with diabetes in the United States. Each states survey showed that nearly 16 percent of its residents were diagnosed with the disease. The U.S. cities with the highest prevalence of diabetes were Mobile, Alabama; Charleston, West Virginia; and Corpus Christi, Texas, which all noted that about 17 percent of their population suffered from the illness. Additionally, the repor Continue reading >>

The 15 Fittest Cities In America

The 15 Fittest Cities In America

Ashley Welch CBS News May 19, 2015, 2:31 PM ACSM ranked the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States in fitness. istockphoto The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) has released its 2015 report naming the nation's fittest cities. To rank the cities, the American Fitness Index took into account each city's obesity, smoking, and diabetes rates, as well as environmental factors like acres of parkland, walkability, and the number of farmers' markets in the area. Researchers looked at data from the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Washington, D.C. was named fittest city in America for second year in a row. istockphoto For the second year in a row, the nation's capital secured the top spot. Ample public parks for recreation, an increasing number of farmers' markets per resident, and a decreasing diabetes death rate helped Washington, D.C. retain its title as the fittest city in America. Minneapolis ranked second in ACSM's fittest cities in America list. istockphoto Coming in at number two, Minneapolis, Minnesota, boasts an increasing number of farmers markets and a high level of walkability to recreational spaces, with 92 percent of its residents within a 10 minute walk of a park. San Diego has seen decreased asthma rates in recent years. istockphoto A high number of acres of parkland and high park-related spending per capita, combined with decreasing asthma rates and lower death rates from diabetes and heart disease landed San Diego at number three on the list. San Francisco has seen decreased death rates from diabetes and heart disease. istockphoto San Francisco has ranked among the top 10 fittest metropolitan areas since 2009. Strengths of the city include decreased smoking rates, decreased death rates from diabetes and cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

2015 State & Community Rankings For Incidence Of Diabetes

2015 State & Community Rankings For Incidence Of Diabetes

WY WI WV WA VA VT UT TX TN SD SC RI PA OR OK OH ND NC NY NM NJ NH NV NE MT AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MNMSMO Third Quintile Fourth Quintile Fifth QuintileSecond QuintileTop Quintile Percentage with DiabetesA StateB Percentage ObeseC 2For more information: www.well-beingindex.com Diabetes in Communities and States Across the U.S. The prevalence of diabetes and obesity continue to increase dramatically. We have an epidemic on our hands. Even more alarming is that only half of people with diabetes are adequately controlling their glucose, a statistic that has not changed in 10 years despite a plethora of new and effective drugs and devices. All of our health care systems need to focus on education, motivation and activation. – Steven Edelman, MD, Founder and Director, Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD) This report, part of the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being series, examines the incidence of diabetes in 190 communities nationwide and across all 50 states. The overall incidence of diabetes in the U.S. adult population is growing, up from 10.6% in 2008 to 11.5% in 2016. The rate increase has resulted in about 2.2 million more Americans with diabetes since 2008. Even more alarming is that obesity, a key risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes, has climbed by almost 3 points since 2008, to reach 28.3% nationally in 2016. Gallup-Healthways data provides a unique lens through which to view incidence of diabetes in states and communities. Lower rates of diabetes could point to citizens of a particular state or community practicing healthier behaviors which, in turn, could lead to better health outcomes and lower incidence of chronic conditions. But a lower rate could also signal under- diagnoses and/or an Continue reading >>

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

The Cdc Mapped Out Where People With Diabetes Live In The Us — Here's What It Found

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar, affects roughly 30 million people in the US — about 9% of the population. That's in addition to 84.1 million Americans who the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes if it isn't treated. (Type 2 accounts for the majority of diabetes cases.) In a new report by the CDC, researchers found that while the rate of new diabetes diagnoses in the US has stayed steady, the disease is still a major public health issue across the country. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2015. "Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes," CDC director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said in a news release. Those cases are disproportionately spread around the country. The map below shows where people with diabetes live across the US, with the darker red shades representing areas where a larger percentage of the population has been diagnosed with diabetes. CDC Areas with the highest concentration of cases are southern states like Mississippi and Alabama, along with Puerto Rico, a US territory. In those locations, diabetes was prevalent in more than 11% of adults over 20. When it comes to new diagnoses, the states with the highest rates per 1,000 people are also in the southeast, as well as parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. CDC Information about where diabetes prevalence is highest can help public health officials figure out where to devote the most attention in their attempt to bring down the number of cases nat Continue reading >>

Why Diabetes Is More Prevalent In Detroit

Why Diabetes Is More Prevalent In Detroit

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 29.1 million Americans today have diabetes. While diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable. Diabetes can be prevented by healthy eating, weight management, and an active lifestyle factors which vary heavily by geography. An estimated 10.6% of adults in the Detroit-Warren-Dearborn metro area have diabetes, more than the national share of 9.3% and the sixth smallest share in Michigan. According to the CDC, more than one in three Americans is prediabetic. A person with prediabetes has blood sugar levels higher than normal, and is 15% to 30% more likely to develop diabetes within five years. Prediabetes is mostly caused by lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise, as well as risk factors such as age and family history. In Detroit, some 23.0% of adults do not exercise outside of work, the same as the national share of 23.0% inactive Americans. In inactive lifestyle can affect the likelihood of developing excess body fat, one of the primary causes of diabetes. In Detroit, however, 30.8% of residents are obese, higher than the national rate of 27.0% and the fourth lowest of any Michigan metro area. Residents of Detroit are also more likely to engage in other unhealthy behaviors. For example, the citys 18.3% smoking rate and 19.6% excessive drinking rate are both higher than than the corresponding national rates of 17.0% and 18.0%. Diabetes is often more prevalent in low-income areas where residents tend to have lower education levels. Individuals living in impoverished neighborhoods are less likely to have adequate access to healthy food, opportunities for exercise, or preventative health care. According to one study, residents of poor neighborhood Continue reading >>

Obesity And Diabetes: Across States, A Clear Relationship

Obesity And Diabetes: Across States, A Clear Relationship

Obesity and Diabetes: Across States, a Clear Relationship More states trending up than down on both health outcomes compared to 2008 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Residents of Colorado, Hawaii, and Utah in the first half of 2009 were the least likely to be obese, while Mississippi, West Virginia, Alaska, and Arkansas residents were the most likely. The incidence of obese people runs nearly eight percentage points higher, on average, in the 10 most obese states compared with the 10 least obese states (30.5% vs. 22.7%, respectively). The midyear results for the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index (from January through June 2009) find obesity in the U.S. increasing to 26.6% in the first half of 2009 from 25.5% in all of 2008. (This is based on respondents' self-reports of their height and weight, which are then used to calculate standard Body Mass Index scores. Individual BMI values of 30 or above are classified as "obese.") Following from the elevated rates of obesity, diabetes incidence has also shown a small but meaningful increase since 2008, with 11.0% of respondents nationwide thus far in 2009 acknowledging that they have been diagnosed with the disease, compared to 10.6% in all of last year. The relationship between obesity and diabetes-related health outcomes is widely understood, and is confirmed by the Gallup-Healthways data, with an average diabetes rate of 9.1% in the 10 least obese states, compared to an average diabetes rate of 12.2% in the 10 most obese states (which includes an 11th state due to a three-way tie for 9th place). If the 10 most obese states had the same obesity rate as the 10 least obese, approximately 4.6 million fewer people would be obese and an estimated 1.8 million fewer would be diagnosed with diabetes in those 10 states alone. Underscoring the po Continue reading >>

The 51 Countries With The Highest Diabetes Rates

The 51 Countries With The Highest Diabetes Rates

Diabetes is one of the largest health issues of the 21st century. According to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 29 million people have diabetes in the U.S. -- 9.3 percent of the population. Equally concerning is that nearly 30 percent of those cases are undiagnosed. How does the U.S. compare to other nations when it comes to levels of diabetes? HealthGrove, a health data site by Graphiq, used data from the International Diabetes Federation to find the countries and territories with the highest rates of diabetes in 2015 (the most recent year available). The report from the IDF includes levels of diabetes prevalence for people aged 20 to 79, as well as the number of diabetes-related fatalities and total number of diabetes cases. The IDF prevalence figures are age-adjusted to account for different age structures in various countries. For context, HealthGrove also included the average amount spent per person with diabetes for each country, as reported by the IDF. These amounts are measured in international dollars, a hypothetical currency with the same purchasing power parity of U.S. dollars in the U.S. at a given point in time. The data from the IDF includes the prevalence of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes (either diagnosed or undiagnosed). Type 1 occurs when the pancreas makes insufficient insulin; Type 2, the more common variety, occurs when the body has difficulty producing and using insulin. The ranking is dominated by small island nations, particularly in the Pacific Islands. Many countries in this region have dealt with malnutrition and inadequate food labeling, especially as they import more processed food. Countries in the Middle East also showed reported elevated levels of diabetes. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar all made the Continue reading >>

Revealed: The Area Where 10% Of People Have Diabetes

Revealed: The Area Where 10% Of People Have Diabetes

Revealed: the area where 10% of people have diabetes Revealed: the area where 10% of people have diabetes According to the list of the 10 areas in England with the highest rates of diabetes that we published today, 10.5 per cent of people in Brent have the condition. This is almost double the rate in the City of London (5.5 per cent), which has Englands lowest rate despite being just three miles from Brent. As well as Brent, the other areas with the highest rates in England are: Newham in London (9.9 per cent); Wolverhampton (9.6 per cent); Harrow in London (9.4 per cent); Sandwell (9.4 per cent); Leicester (9.3 per cent); Walsall (8.8 per cent); Blackburn with Darwen (8.7 per cent); Redbridge in London (8.7 per cent); and Birmingham (8.7 per cent). While Brent is currently the only area with a rate of over one in 10 people have the condition, six other areas are projected to join it by the end of the decade. Nationally, 7.4 per cent of people aged over 16 are now thought to have diabetes and this is projected to rise to 8.4 per cent by 2020. This rise is expected to comprise mainly of new cases of Type 2 diabetes, where risk factors include being overweight; having a large waist; being over 40 (or over 25 if they are South Asian); or having a close relative with diabetes. We have responded to the news by urging people to make sure they know the risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and have a risk assessment if any of these apply to them. People can do this at a pharmacy, their GP surgery, or online , and this can act as the start of people reducing their risk; 80 per cent of cases of Type 2 could be delayed or prevented through making healthy lifestyle changes. We are also concerned that many people think that diabetes is a relatively mild condition and so do not see the Continue reading >>

Mexico City

Mexico City

Mexico City is the 4th largest city in the world. DIABETES PREVALENCE IN MEXICO CITY, 20172045 (ADULTS AGED 2079) If we reduce obesity by 25.0% by 2045, 700,000 cases of type 2 diabetes can be avoided and 669 million dollars in healthcare expenditure saved UNDERSTANDING THE COMPLEXITY OF VULNERABILITY The Vulnerability Assessment shows that socioeconomic vulnerabilities are exacerbated when people cannot engage with healthcare services. Barriers to care provision include lack of resources, lack of understanding of what services entail and lack of trust in institutions and care provision. Various insights into vulnerability for type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications have emerged from the research, the most important of which are highlighted below. How individuals and communities engage with healthcare resources in Mexico City is influenced by their trust or mistrust in the quality of care, their perceived right of access to those services, and barriers to accessing them. Insufficient insurance or the absence of insurance altogether can either be a motivator to manage ones own health to avoid a precarious situation, or a disheartening experience for those who feel theirs is a helpless condition. With an abundance of needs but limited resources, it is logical to prioritise certain needs over others. In the face of socioeconomic disadvantage, people in Mexico City find themselves having to make a choice between food and medication; paying the bills or paying for transport to their hospital appointment. Similarly, when confronted with more than one health concern at a given moment, people choose to focus their attention and energy on illness at the expense of other health concerns. Gender is very relevant to the experience of illness. In a society that places th Continue reading >>

This 1 U.s. State Has The Highest Diabetes Rate In The Country

This 1 U.s. State Has The Highest Diabetes Rate In The Country

This 1 U.S. State Has the Highest Diabetes Rate in the Country The United States is well known for its obesity problem. Obesity can lead to health complications like heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes . As of 2015, about 9.4% of the population had type 2 diabetes according to Diabetes.org. However, the disease is far more prevalent in certain states. Weve ranked the top 10 states with the highest type 2 diabetes rates and followed it with the top 10 states with the lowest type 2 diabetes rates. The rates are according to stateofobesity.org . Oklahoma is the first state to make the list with about 12% of its adult population living with diabetes . 32.8% of Oklahomas adult population is obese. Oklahoma requires its elementary school students to participate in physical education classes but not its middle school or high school students. PE classes can be a driving force in helping children prevent obesity and diabetes in later years. Louisiana ties for the eighth position with 12.1% of its population suffering from diabetes . It is also the fifth most obese state in the nation, with 35.5% of its population falling into the obese category. 34% of Louisiana youth are either overweight or obese, but the state does require physical education classes for students of all ages. Georgia | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images Georgia ties with Louisiana with 12.1% of its population dealing with diabetes . However, when it comes to obesity, Georgia is much better off than Louisiana Georgia ranks 20th in obesity in the U.S. Georgia requires physical education classes in its elementary schools and high schools, but 32.2% of children are still either obese or overweight. Next: The country music capital has a diabetes problem. Tennessee | Sean Pavone/iStock/Getty Images In Tennessee, Continue reading >>

Here Are The States With The Lowest & Highest Diabetes Rates

Here Are The States With The Lowest & Highest Diabetes Rates

Diabetes is on the rise in the United States, and a new poll looks at where the disease is most and least common. In the poll, from Gallup-Healthways, researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of more than 176,000 Americans in all 50 states in 2015. The participants were asked whether they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes in their lifetime. The three states with the lowest rates of diabetes were Utah, Rhode Island and Colorado. In these states, 7.5 to 8 percent of the survey participants said they had diabetes. In contrast, Alabama and West Virginia had the highest rates of diabetes, with about 16 percent of the participants in those two states saying they had been diagnosed with the disease. The poll also looked at the rate of diabetes in cities nationwide. The city with the lowest rate of diabetes was Boulder, Colorado, where slightly less than 5 percent of residents said they had diabetes, followed by Bellingham, Washington, where about 6 percent said they had diabetes. The two cities with the highest rates of diabetes were Mobile, Alabama, and Charleston, West Virginia, where more than 17 percent of residents said they had diabetes. [Diabetes in America: Full List of State Rankings] The results were published Wednesday (Nov. 30) in a report from Gallup-Healthways. "Lower rates of diabetes could point to citizens of a particular state or community practicing healthier behaviors, which, in turn, could lead to better health outcomes and lower incidence of chronic conditions," Gallup-Healthways said in its report. "But a lower rate could also signal underdiagnoses" of diabetes, the report said. The overall rate of diabetes in the United States in 2016 was 11.5 percent, up from 10.6 percent in 2008, Gallup-Healthways said. (The 2016 data is based on a Continue reading >>

Cdc: Top 10 Cities With Highest Percentage Of Adults With Diabetes

Cdc: Top 10 Cities With Highest Percentage Of Adults With Diabetes

Cities in Texas and Georgia are seeing more adults 18 years and older diagnosed with diabetes than previous years, according to data released by the CDC. The CDC, in partnership with the CDC Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, created the 500 Cities Project, an interactive web application designed to help public health professionals, legislators and researchers identify geographical areas where specific health outcomes such as COPD, cancer and arthritis, among others, are most prevalent. Here are the top 10 cities with the highest percentage of adults diagnosed with diabetes. The results have been adjusted for age. Brownsville, Texas — 16.9 percent of adults Pharr, Texas — 16.8 Laredo, Texas — 16.8 Macon, Ga. — 16.6 Compton, Calif. — 16.5 Lynwood, Calif. — 16.4 Birmingham, Ala. — 16.1 Albany, Ga. — 15.9 Edinburg, Texas — 15.1 Jackson, Miss. — 15.1 South Gate, Calif. — 15 To view the full list, click here. More articles on population health: Ebola fighter on 2014 Time magazine cover dies Low-income elderly patients more likely to have multiple chronic diseases An increase in fruit & vegetable intake reduces COPD risk in smokers, study finds © Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2018. Interested in LINKING to or REPRINTING this content? View our policies by clicking here. Continue reading >>

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