diabetestalk.net

Cinnamon Ginger Diabetes

The Anti-oxidant Effects Of Ginger And Cinnamon On Spermatogenesis Dys-function Of Diabetes Rats

The Anti-oxidant Effects Of Ginger And Cinnamon On Spermatogenesis Dys-function Of Diabetes Rats

The Anti-Oxidant Effects of Ginger and Cinnamon on Spermatogenesis Dys-function of Diabetes Rats Find articles by Farhad Sadeghpour Golzar 1Women's Reproductive Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran 2Department of food and Nutrition, San Jose State University, USA Copyright Afr. J. Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicines 2014 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes rats have been linked to reproductive dysfunction and plant medicine has been shown to be effective in its treatment. Antioxidants have distinctive effects on spermatogenesis, sperm biology and oxidative stress, and changes in anti-oxidant capacity are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetes mellitus. Ginger and cinnamon are strong anti-oxidants and have been shown to reduce oxidative stress in the long-term treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in animal models. The present study examined the influence of combined ginger and cinnamon on spermatogenesis in STZ-induced diabetes in male Wistar rats. Animals (n = 80) were allocated randomly into eight groups, 10 each: Group 1: Control rats given only 5cc Normal saline (0.9% NaCl) daily;Group2: rats received ginger (100mg/kg/rat) daily; Group 3: rats received cinnamon (75mg/kg) daily; Group 4: rats received ginger and cinnamon, (100mg/kg/rat ginger and 75mg/kg cinnamon) daily; Group 5: Diabetic control rats received only normal saline. Group 6: Diabetic rats received 100mg/kg/day ginger; Group 7: Diabetic rats received 75mg /kg/ day cinnamon; Group 8: Diabetic rats received ginger and cinnamon (100mg/kg/day and 75mg/kg /day). Diabetes was induced with 55 mg/kg, single intra-peritoneal injection of STZ in all groups. At the end of the experiment (56th d Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

People with diabetes often face dietary restrictions to control their blood sugar and prevent complications. Although research is in a preliminary stage, cinnamon may help fight some symptoms of diabetes. It is also unlikely to cause blood pressure spikes, or disrupt blood sugar. So, people with diabetes who miss a sweet pop of flavor may find that cinnamon is a good replacement for sugar. Can cinnamon affect blood sugar? Cinnamon has shown promise in the treatment of blood sugar, as well as some other diabetes symptoms. Research on the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar in diabetes is mixed and in the early stages. Most studies have been very small, so more research is necessary. People with diabetes who are interested in herbal remedies, however, may be surprised to learn that doctors are serious about the potential for cinnamon to address some diabetes symptoms. A 2003 study published in Diabetes Care, compared the effects of a daily intake of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon with a group that received a placebo for 40 days. All three levels of cinnamon intake reduced blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The effects were seen even 20 days after participants were no longer taking cinnamon. A small 2016 study of 25 people, published in the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, found that cinnamon may be beneficial for people with poorly controlled diabetes. Participants consumed 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks. The result was a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine had a different result. The study, which used a more reliable method, had slightly more participants, at 70. The researchers found that 1 g of cinnamon per day for 30 days and 60 days offered no improvements in blo Continue reading >>

Turmeric And Diabetes: 10 Ways Turmeric Can Help

Turmeric And Diabetes: 10 Ways Turmeric Can Help

One diabetes medicine may lower blood sugar and cholesterol, protect your eyes and kidneys, relieve pain, prevent cancer, and improve your sex life. It also tastes good. This medicine is turmeric, made from the root Curcuma longa, a member of the ginger family. About 2% to 5% of turmeric is the yellow/orange powder called curcumin, which gives curry powder its beautiful color. The taste has a bite to it, but with the right recipe, you’ll love it. Or you can take capsules. Turmeric has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic (Indian) and Chinese medicine. They give it for pain relief, improved digestion and liver function, and for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Curcumin may also help treat aspects of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2. A scientific paper from the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and McGill University reviewed multiple studies of curcumin from around the world. Most of these are studies of diabetic rats and mice. They need to be repeated in humans to gain scientific acceptance, but I’m convinced. • In many of these studies, curcumin reduced blood sugar and cholesterol levels. In addition: • Curcumin prevented liver fat accumulation. Rats who consumed curcumin had reduced liver fat on a high-fat diet compared to rats not consuming curcumin. • Curcumin suppressed the activities of white blood cells called macrophages that cause inflammation. This action of turmeric/curcumin could potentially slow down many complications of diabetes, in which inflammation plays a role. • Curcumin improves insulin function. It reduces insulin resistance by helping insulin get into cells, perhaps on the AMPK pathway that exercise also opens up. In a study of 240 people in Thailand, curcumin prevented prediabetes from progressing to diabetes. Rou Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Ginger If You Have Diabetes?

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that some people are born with and others may develop over time. It affects the way people produce or respond to insulin, which in turn affects the way your body processes sugar. Because of this, it’s important to take note of what you’re eating and how it may impact your blood sugar levels. Ginger, for example, is low in carbohydrates and calories. It has only 1.3 grams of carbohydrates per teaspoon. Known for its spicy taste and unmistakable flavor, ginger also contains potassium, iron, and fiber. Over the years, ginger has been shown to help reduce blood sugar levels and help regulate insulin response in people with diabetes. In one 2014 animal study, obese rats with diabetes were given a mix of cinnamon and ginger. These rats experienced a wealth of benefits, including: reduced body weight reduced body fat mass decreased blood sugar levels increased insulin levels According to researchers in a 2015 study, ginger powder supplements may help improve fasting blood sugar. Participants in this study were given 2 grams of ginger every day for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, researchers found that people in this group also experienced lower levels of: hemoglobin A1c apolipoprotein B apolipoprotein A-1 malondialdehyde Researchers in a 2016 study on rats with diabetes found that ginger might help protect against heart problems that occur due to diabetes. Ginger’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help prevent certain diabetes complications. Although many studies suggest that ginger could be useful in diabetes management, you should take precautions when consuming it. You shouldn’t consume more than 4 grams of ginger per day. Although side effects are rare, it’s possible to experience heartburn, diarrhea, and upset stomach if Continue reading >>

Ginger And Diabetes

Ginger And Diabetes

Tweet Ginger is the thick knotted underground stem (rhizome) of the plant Zingiber officinale that has been used for centuries in Asian cuisine and medicine. Native to Africa, India, China, Australia and Jamaica, it is commonly used as a spice or flavouring agent in cooking, as an alternative ‘herbal’ treatment for various ailments such as nausea and indigestion, and for fragrance in soaps and cosmetics. Ginger rhizome can be used fresh, dried and powdered, or as a juice or oil. It has a pungent and sharp aroma and adds a strong spicy flavour to food and drink. Effect on diabetes Glycemic control A study published in the August 2012 edition of the natural product journal Planta Medica suggested that ginger may improve long-term blood sugar control for people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers from the University of Sydney, Australia, found that extracts from Buderim Ginger (Australian grown ginger) rich in gingerols - the major active component of ginger rhizome - can increase uptake of glucose into muscle cells without using insulin, and may therefore assist in the management of high blood sugar levels. Insulin secretion In the December 2009 issue of the European Journal of Pharmacology, researchers reported that two different ginger extracts, spissum and an oily extract, interact with serotonin receptors to reveres their effect on insulin secretion. Treatment with the extracts led to a 35 per cent drop in blood glucose levels and a 10 per cent increase in plasma insulin levels. Cataract protection A study published in the August 2010 edition of Molecular Vision revealed that a small daily dose of ginger helped delay the onset and progression of cataracts - one of the sight-related complications of long-term diabetes - in diabetic rats. It’s also worth noting that Continue reading >>

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Can Ginger Help Treat Or Cure Type 2 Diabetes? | Everyday Health

RELATED: The Best and Worst Foods to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes Potential Health Benefits of Ginger for Type 2 Diabetes Ginger is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory substance that has many potential health benefits for certain conditions, including certain types of cancer, suggests a study published in April 2013 in the International Journal of Preventive Medicine . The possible perks of this herb dont end there. We know that ginger is commonly used to help relieve nausea, vomiting, or any upset stomach, and there is also some evidence it may reduce menstrual pain symptoms , morning sickness in pregnant women, and even arthritis pain in joints, says Rahaf Al Bochi, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and owner of Olive Tree Nutrition . RELATED: The 7 Best Foods for a Healthy Immune System When it comes to type 2 diabetes, Al Bochi says the value of ginger remains unclear due to limited research. But results produced thus far may suggest promise for including the herb in your diabetes treatment plan. Al Boshi references a review published in March 2015 in the Journal of Ethnic Foods that suggested taking ginger supplements may help reduce A1C levels and fasting serum glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A1C is a common diabetes test that measures your average blood sugar level over a two- to three-month period. Sounds great, right? Not so fast: Al Bochi notes the review wasnt without flaw. All of the sample groups were really small, they were done over a few weeks of time, and they were all homogenous based out of one or two countries. Due to those factors, the studies the researchers analyzed didnt provide enough information for health experts to conclusively recommend ginger as an effective treatment for type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Effects Of Cinnamon, Cardamom, Saffron, And Ginger Consumption On Markers Of Glycemic Control, Lipid Profile, Oxidative Stress, And Inflammation In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Effects Of Cinnamon, Cardamom, Saffron, And Ginger Consumption On Markers Of Glycemic Control, Lipid Profile, Oxidative Stress, And Inflammation In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Effects of Cinnamon, Cardamom, Saffron, and Ginger Consumption on Markers of Glycemic Control, Lipid Profile, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes Patients 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 1Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran 2Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran Address correspondence to: Reza Ghiasvand, e-mail: [email protected] Received 2014 Dec 20; Revised 2015 Jan 19; Accepted 2015 Jan 24. Copyright 2014, SBDR - Society for Biomedical Diabetes Research This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. OBJECTIVES: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) may be caused by elevated oxidative stress, inflammation, and Continue reading >>

Synergistic Effect Of Green Tea, Cinnamon And Ginger Combination On Enhancing Postprandial Blood Glucose - Scialert Responsive Version

Synergistic Effect Of Green Tea, Cinnamon And Ginger Combination On Enhancing Postprandial Blood Glucose - Scialert Responsive Version

Synergistic Effect of Green Tea, Cinnamon and Ginger Combination on Enhancing Postprandial Blood Glucose This study was maintained to determine the immediate effect of green tea, cinnamon, ginger and combination of them on postprandial glucose levels. The Glycemic Index (GI) for previous treatments was measured as an indicator for postprandial glucose pattern. Twenty-two healthy volunteers from both genders were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 21.3 years and mean BMI was 24.6 kg m-2. For each herb and combination treatment, a concentration of 2.5% aqueous tea extract was prepared. The GI of green tea, cinnamon and ginger were 79, 63 and 72 respectively. Herbs combination exerted GI of 60, which was the lowest. Combination of these herbs showed the best lowering effect on postprandial glucose levels as compared with each herb alone. A potential synergism from the active ingredients of blended herbs was determined. Firas Sultan Azzeh , 2013. Synergistic Effect of Green Tea, Cinnamon and Ginger Combination on Enhancing Postprandial Blood Glucose. Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences, 16: 74-79. URL: Herbs and spices are commonly used in human consumption. Most of them have been proved to control blood glucose levels ( Viuda-Martos et al., 2010 ). The scale that ranks foods by how much they raise blood glucose levels compared to a standard food is called Glycemic Index (GI). The standard food could be glucose or white bread ( CDA, 2009 ). Much evidence suggest that high blood glucose concentrations in the postprandial state are considered as risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic disorders, not only in diabetic patients but also in healthy people ( Trinidad et al., 2010 ). This has led to the concept that reducing postprandial blood glucose concentra Continue reading >>

Add Spice And Add Life!

Add Spice And Add Life!

Ryan Bradley, ND, MPH July, 2006 Is it just chance that many cultures have traditional dishes that have been passed down generation after generation and are still eaten today? Have you ever considered whether these foods, or food combinations, may have health benefits? While dietary research largely overlooks the possible health benefits of traditional foods due to its focus on fat content versus carbohydrate content, clinical research on specific foods and food ingredients demonstrates food as more than fat and carbohydrates, but contains compounds that improve health. In diabetes, these healthful qualities include improvement in blood sugar, reduction in inflammation, improvement in cholesterol and lipid status, and perhaps reduction in blood pressure. So far in the medical literature, the herbs and spices from the Indian continent seem to be among the most active for improving blood sugar. Clinical and basic bench, i.e. test tube, research has demonstrated benefit of the spices: cinnamon, fenugreek, ginger, tumeric, and cumin. Cinnamon and Diabetes At least three clinical studies have been performed to test the blood sugar lowering and insulin-sensitizing affects of Cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia). In one of these studies, different doses (1,3, or 6 grams) of cinnamon were given in capsules to people with diabetes for 40 days (Khan et al. 2003); this study demonstrated improvements in both fasting blood sugar and in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol at all doses. Similar findings were observed when an aqueous (water-based) extract (equivalent to 3 grams of powdered cinnamon) was administered to people with diabetes for four months; these people were not using insulin (Mang et al. 2006). However, recently published research by Vanschoonbeek et al. contradicts these reports, fi Continue reading >>

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

We live in a world where prescription medicine is getting more and more expensive as well as controversial. Alternative medicine is gaining momentum and with good reason! The same is true for treatments for diabetes type 2. You have therapies that can reverse diabetes through lifestyle and diet changes, natural supplements that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, and also herbs that lower blood sugar. Not only are these alternative therapies safer, but they are also easier on your pocket, on your body and mind. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar. We want to clarify one thing right away – not everything on our list can be classified as ‘herbs’. However, they are all from natural sources. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit, such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. RELATED: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best herbs that lower blood sugar, along with a few spices thrown in, to give you a more comprehensive list. Please note that while we normally do not use animal studies to support any dietary supplement, several herbs like garlic and ginger are considered ‘food’ and so, are used traditionally by cultures across the world in their daily diet Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

It’s fine to sprinkle cinnamon on your oatmeal or use it in baking. Go ahead and enjoy it if you like its taste. But if you hope that it will help you manage your diabetes, you might want to pause before you head to your spice rack. It's not yet clear if cinnamon is good for diabetes. Research findings have been mixed, and the American Diabetes Association dismisses cinnamon’s use in diabetes treatment. Several small studies have linked cinnamon to better blood sugar levels. Some of this work shows it may curb blood sugar by lowering insulin resistance. In one study, volunteers ate from 1 to 6 grams of cinnamon for 40 days. (One gram of ground cinnamon is about half a teaspoon.) The researchers found that cinnamon cut cholesterol by about 18% and blood sugar levels by 24%. But in other studies, the spice did not lower blood sugar or cholesterol levels. Unless you have liver damage, it should be OK for you to enjoy it in food. If you do have liver problems, be careful, because large amounts of cinnamon may make them worse. you might like If you are considering cinnamon supplements, talk with your doctor first, especially if you take any medication. Also, look for brands labeled with a quality seal. These include the NSF International, US Pharmacopeia, or Consumerlab seal. This helps assure that the supplement actually has the ingredients stated on the label and doesn't have any contaminants or potentially harmful ingredients. Unlike medications, supplement makers don't have to prove their products are safe or effective. But the FDA can order a supplement off the market if it proves it's unsafe. Use caution if you also take other supplements that lower blood sugar levels, including: Bitter melon Devil's claw Fenugreek Garlic Horse chestnut Panax Siberian ginseng The s Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Help Manage Diabetes?

Does Cinnamon Help Manage Diabetes?

Review of a Common Diabetes Dietary Supplement By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Cinnamon in two forms: sticks and powder.Matthew O'Shea/Getty Images Cinnamon is a spice that has been used since ancient times for medicinal purposes. Recently, cinnamon has become a hot topic in diabetes research with conflicting results. The studies have been based on the idea that cinnamon may help to lower blood sugar. Studies showing cinnamon as an effective diabetic treatment have proposed that cinnamon may have an insulin-like effect on cells -- triggering cells to take glucose out of the blood -- or that cinnamon may cause an increase in the activity of the transporter proteins that move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. What the Research Says About Cinnamon and Blood Sugar In the 2000s, several studies showed conflicting results, with some studies pointing to a hypoglycemic (blood sugar lowering) effect of cinnamon and others showing no significant effect. But more recent research suggests that cinnamon may indeed help to lower blood sugar. A 2013 review of 10 randomized control trials (the strongest kind of study for nutrition research) suggests that ingesting cinnamon does, in fact, lower fasting blood sugars, as well as total cholesterol. In the randomized controlled trials, people were given between 120 mg/day to 6 g/day for 4 to 18 weeks. That's the equivalent of between a small fraction of a teaspoon to two teaspoons per day. Adding a small amount of cinnamon to your daily diet--by sprinkling it on oatmeal, or using it to spice up a Mexican chili--can't hurt and may help. But as with any supplement, check with your healthcare professional before taking cinnamon in larger doses. Things to Consider Before Taking Cinnamon for Diabetes As with a Continue reading >>

Ginger, Honey And Cinnamon Mixture To Reverse Inflammation, Colds, Flu, Cramps, Diabetes And Cancer

Ginger, Honey And Cinnamon Mixture To Reverse Inflammation, Colds, Flu, Cramps, Diabetes And Cancer

Ginger, Honey and Cinnamon Mixture to Reverse Inflammation, Colds, Flu, Cramps, Diabetes and Cancer We all know about the amazing healing powers that tea possesses. Their medicinal properties have been recognized for centuries, with as many different varieties as there are people who enjoy tea in the world. But there is one brew combination that can make defeating illness in the winter feel like a walk on a sun soaked beach. Ginger, honey and cinnamon are the stars of this show and their healing powers are on full display in this recipe. Heres what youll need. 2 tablespoons of fresh squeezed organic lemon juice Bring your water to boil and drop in your peeled and sliced ginger . Once the water gets to a rolling boil, lower the heat and bring it to a simmer. Drop in your cinnamon stick and let it simmer there for about 5 minutes. Strain the mixture and stir in your honey for a little sweetness and your lemon juice for a vitamin and antioxidant boost. Enjoy! Here are some of the reasons why we love making and drinking this tea. While it is amazing at curbing colds and flus, it has a heap of other benefits for you to take advantage of. Ginger and honey are some of the most commonly recognized superfoods and cinnamon is no chump either. Recent studies have found that drinking lemon and ginger tea has been very effective at decreasing the harmful effects of diabetes. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, stroke and eye disease. This teas antioxidant content can help you avoid these dangers. One of the main reasons that people drink this tea is for its ability to fight colds and flus. The amount of antioxidants and vitamins that this tea contains is astounding, but its also great at treating and preventing nausea. This tea is also great at Continue reading >>

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Chances are you have a bottle of cinnamon in your spice cupboard. And chances are you never thought of cinnamon as medicine. However, cinnamon has been used medicinally since ancient times. This popular spice was used in ancient Egypt, China, and India for culinary and medicinal purposes, and its use has also been documented in the Bible. There are two types of cinnamon: Ceylon and cassia, both derived from the bark of evergreen trees. Ceylon cinnamon is grown in South America, Southeast Asia, and the West Indies, while cassia cinnamon is grown in Central America, China, and Indonesia. Ceylon cinnamon bark looks like tightly rolled scrolls, while cassia cinnamon is more loosely rolled. Cassia is the variety most commonly sold in the United States. Most people think of cinnamon as a flavoring for desserts or as a warm, robust scent for candles and potpourri. But this spice may do more than make your house smell good. Cinnamon has been shown to help lower blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. A study published in the journal Diabetes Care in 2003 looked at 60 men and women with Type 2 diabetes who were taking diabetes pills. The participants took either 1, 3, or 6 grams of cassia cinnamon or a placebo, in capsule form, for 40 days. After this time, blood glucose levels dropped between 18% and 29% in all three groups that received cinnamon. However, only the participants who had taken the smallest amount of cinnamon (1 gram) continued to have improved blood glucose levels 20 days after they stopped taking it, for reasons the researchers didn’t quite understand. In the study, cinnamon also helped lower triglycerides (a blood lipid) and LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol levels. The benefits continued after 60 days, 20 days after participants had stopped taking Continue reading >>

What Are The Health Benefits Of Tea With Ginger, Cinnamon & Anise?

What Are The Health Benefits Of Tea With Ginger, Cinnamon & Anise?

What Are the Health Benefits of Tea With Ginger, Cinnamon & Anise? Tea with ginger, cinnamon and anise may help maintain healthy blood sugar. 4 What Are the Benefits of White Sage Tea? Tea spiced with ginger, cinnamon and anise, often referred to as chai tea, originated in India as long as 5,000 years ago as part of the ayurvedic traditional medicine system, according to the Pacific College of Oriental Medicine. Chai tea offers numerous potential benefits contributed by black, oolong or green tea and each of its constituent spices. Tea, whether in its fermented form, such as black or oolong, or its unfermented green form, supplies antioxidants that provide numerous potential health benefits. It is particularly helpful for cholesterol-lowering and heart-strengthening. Flavonoid antioxidants in green and black tea may prevent atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. These compounds may also increase levels of nitric oxide, which promotes relaxation of blood vessels and decreased blood pressure, according to a review of previously published research that appeared in the December 2010 issue of the journal "Molecular Aspects of Medicine." Other potential benefits of tea include decreased inflammation, decreased blood clotting and lower risk for Type 2 diabetes, say researchers -- all of which contribute to cardiovascular health. Ginger contributes numerous benefits to chai tea, by virtue of its active constituents -- gingerol and shogaol are useful for reducing nausea associated with motion sickness and help improve digestion, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Ginger is also a powerful natural anti-inflammatory substance that may help protect brain and nerve cells, according to a tissue culture study published in the November 2011 issue of the jo Continue reading >>

More in diabetes