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Cinnamon Capsules Diabetes

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Cinnamon bark is usually derived from the bark of the cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The most common species of cinnamon available is cassia or Chinese cinnamon, but other varieties include Indonesian cinnamon (Padang cassia or Korintje), Vietnamese cinnamon (Vietnamese cassia) or Sri Lanka (Ceylon) cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) is often a combination of these forms of cinnamon, and is the most common type found, at least in North America. Cassia cinnamon has Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status in the US and is considered safe in the amount commonly found in food and beverages.[1] The volatile oils (those that give cinnamon its distinctive odor) in cinnamon consist mainly of a substance known as cinnamaldehyde. Other substances found in cinnamon include coumarin and polyphenols such as hydroxychalcone. Cinnamaldehyde has antibacterial properties, antitumor properties and some immune system effects. The polyphenol hydroxychalcone appears to be responsible for the reported antidiabetic effects of cassia cinnamon and to a lesser degree, other forms of cinnamon. The Anti-Diabetes Actions of Cinnamon Research in a number of animal models of diabetes indicate that cassia cinnamon can increase insulin secretion, though its effects on blood sugar levels does not seem to be very significant. In clinical trials, the evidence that cassia cinnamon can effectively lower blood sugar levels and lower A1c percentage has been inconsistent. Some clinical studies have indicated that cassia cinnamon can lower the fasting blood sugar, HbA1C percentages, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure when compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes while others have not demonstrated any effect. The doses Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Can Cinnamon Capsules Help Fight Diabetes?

Can Cinnamon Capsules Help Fight Diabetes?

Many people would love to find a natural way to control their blood sugar and overcome diabetes. While we don’t advocate ignoring the doctor’s advice, one reader has found that changing her diet and adding cinnamon capsules to her regimen has helped enormously. What Can Cinnamon Capsules Do? Q. I honestly hate anything cinnamon and usually avoid it although my husband loves cinnamon and ginger. I am 53 and was diagnosed with Type II diabetes several years ago. I’ve never had my blood sugar go over 220 at any given time, so my doctor, who is a diabetes specialist, has me on metformin. Fasting Glucose Levels Are Down: In the last few months, my fasting glucose levels have become completely normal again, between 73 and 92 every morning. So with my doctor’s knowledge, I’ve lowered my dose of metformin. I believe this is due to two things: First, I try not to eat ANY white flour, rice or breads at all and second, I’ve been taking cinnamon capsules every morning with my diabetes-formulated multi-vitamin. I don’t have any eye-focusing problems that I used to have in the mornings, no tingling, nothing! I’ve also lost 8 pounds. I think that all this together has improved my particular case. No White Food Helps Control Blood Sugar: A. Congratulations on your improved blood sugar control and your weight loss. Your decision to avoid white bread and other flour products has probably contributed to your success. Within the last several years, there has been a recognition that such foods can make blood sugar spike nearly as much and a rapidly as sweet foods. Restricting them makes sense for people struggling to control blood glucose. Cinnamon can also help prevent blood sugar spikes after meals. For more details on these and a variety of other approaches to control blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Can Cinnamon Lower Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Treatment: Can Cinnamon Lower Blood Sugar?

Is it true that cinnamon can lower blood sugar in people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Whether cinnamon can lower blood sugar is a topic of debate — but some research suggests that cinnamon may be helpful as a supplement to regular diabetes treatment in people with type 2 diabetes. A 2012 review of several recent studies concluded that the use of cinnamon had a potentially beneficial effect on glycemic control. One study published in 2009 found that a 500 mg capsule of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved hemoglobin A1C levels — a reflection of average blood sugar level for the past two to three months — in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1C levels greater than 7 percent). More research is needed to confirm these findings and determine how cinnamon supplementation could lead to these benefits. One theory is that cinnamon increases insulin action. If you have diabetes, remember that treatment is a lifelong commitment of blood sugar monitoring, healthy eating, regular exercise and, sometimes, diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Consult your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your diabetes treatment plan. Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

It’s fine to sprinkle cinnamon on your oatmeal or use it in baking. Go ahead and enjoy it if you like its taste. But if you hope that it will help you manage your diabetes, you might want to pause before you head to your spice rack. It's not yet clear if cinnamon is good for diabetes. Research findings have been mixed, and the American Diabetes Association dismisses cinnamon’s use in diabetes treatment. Several small studies have linked cinnamon to better blood sugar levels. Some of this work shows it may curb blood sugar by lowering insulin resistance. In one study, volunteers ate from 1 to 6 grams of cinnamon for 40 days. (One gram of ground cinnamon is about half a teaspoon.) The researchers found that cinnamon cut cholesterol by about 18% and blood sugar levels by 24%. But in other studies, the spice did not lower blood sugar or cholesterol levels. Unless you have liver damage, it should be OK for you to enjoy it in food. If you do have liver problems, be careful, because large amounts of cinnamon may make them worse. you might like If you are considering cinnamon supplements, talk with your doctor first, especially if you take any medication. Also, look for brands labeled with a quality seal. These include the NSF International, US Pharmacopeia, or Consumerlab seal. This helps assure that the supplement actually has the ingredients stated on the label and doesn't have any contaminants or potentially harmful ingredients. Unlike medications, supplement makers don't have to prove their products are safe or effective. But the FDA can order a supplement off the market if it proves it's unsafe. Use caution if you also take other supplements that lower blood sugar levels, including: Bitter melon Devil's claw Fenugreek Garlic Horse chestnut Panax Siberian ginseng The s Continue reading >>

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Chances are you have a bottle of cinnamon in your spice cupboard. And chances are you never thought of cinnamon as medicine. However, cinnamon has been used medicinally since ancient times. This popular spice was used in ancient Egypt, China, and India for culinary and medicinal purposes, and its use has also been documented in the Bible. There are two types of cinnamon: Ceylon and cassia, both derived from the bark of evergreen trees. Ceylon cinnamon is grown in South America, Southeast Asia, and the West Indies, while cassia cinnamon is grown in Central America, China, and Indonesia. Ceylon cinnamon bark looks like tightly rolled scrolls, while cassia cinnamon is more loosely rolled. Cassia is the variety most commonly sold in the United States. Most people think of cinnamon as a flavoring for desserts or as a warm, robust scent for candles and potpourri. But this spice may do more than make your house smell good. Cinnamon has been shown to help lower blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. A study published in the journal Diabetes Care in 2003 looked at 60 men and women with Type 2 diabetes who were taking diabetes pills. The participants took either 1, 3, or 6 grams of cassia cinnamon or a placebo, in capsule form, for 40 days. After this time, blood glucose levels dropped between 18% and 29% in all three groups that received cinnamon. However, only the participants who had taken the smallest amount of cinnamon (1 gram) continued to have improved blood glucose levels 20 days after they stopped taking it, for reasons the researchers didn’t quite understand. In the study, cinnamon also helped lower triglycerides (a blood lipid) and LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol levels. The benefits continued after 60 days, 20 days after participants had stopped taking Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes?

Cinnamon For Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for 5 to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. In this form of the disease, which occurs most often in children and young adults, the body does not produce any insulin; people with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to stay alive. Some evidence suggests that cinnamon might help people with the much more common type 2 diabetes (in which the pancreas still produces insulin, but cells become resistant to it), but not those with type 1. The first study suggesting that cinnamon might help control blood sugar (and cholesterol) was published in the December, 2003, issue of Diabetes Care. Done in Pakistan, it ran for only 40 days and included 60 patients with type 2 diabetes. It showed that one, three, or six grams of cinnamon daily, divided into two doses (that amounts to between a quarter of a teaspoon to one teaspoon a day), lowered fasting glucose by 18 to 29 percent, triglycerides by 23 to 30 percent, LDL cholesterol by 7 to 27 percent, and total cholesterol by 12 to 26 percent. Since that first small study made news nearly seven years ago, other researchers have tried to confirm its findings. A German study published in 2006 compared effects in 79 patients with type 2 diabetes, half of whom took a placebo and half of whom received 3 grams of cinnamon daily for four months. Fasting glucose levels dropped by about 7 percent more in the cinnamon group, but the researchers saw no difference between the two groups in LDL or HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or average blood sugar over the four-month period. An even smaller study published in 2006 found no improvements due to cinnamon, and in 2008, the journal Diabetes Care published an analysis of all the cinnamon studies and found no improvements in blood su Continue reading >>

Cinnamon May Not Be Best For Diabetes

Cinnamon May Not Be Best For Diabetes

Cinnamon has been talked about for years because of its supposed benefits for people with diabetes. The common spice is thought to lower both blood glucose and A1C levels. How? By improving your cells’ sensitivity to the hormone insulin, which controls blood glucose levels. That is why many people want to know if they can use cinnamon instead of their diabetes medicines. The research Studies looking into these claims about cinnamon have mostly involved small groups of 60-100 people, and have only lasted 5 to 16 weeks. On the other hand, studies that look at diabetes medicines can sometimes take years. For example, Metformin, the drug of choice for type 2 diabetes, has been studied in very large trials of thousands of patients over the course of many years. This level of study was able to show that not only does Metformin lower blood glucose and A1C, but it also increases lifespan and decreases complications of those who take it. Because of the low numbers of patients involved in cinnamon studies, in 2013, the Cochrane Library independent organization pooled together 10 cinnamon trials with 577 people. When the data from all the different trials were combined, it was found that taking cinnamon did not significantly lower blood glucose or A1C. In addition, none of the trials looked at the effectiveness of cinnamon in preventing diabetes complications. The common claim that cinnamon improves insulin sensitivity has not been proven in clinical trials, either. The takeaway If you enjoy cinnamon for its aroma and spicy sweetness, go ahead and enjoy it, but don’t count on it to control your diabetes. Looking for a natural and safe option is the smart way to go about caring for your health, but make sure you choose therapies that have been proven to work: Lose weight, or ma Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

Go to: The incidence of type II diabetes is increasing across the world. Dietary modifications help the patients to control blood glucose. Traditional herbs and spices are commonly used for control of glucose among which cinnamon (Ròu Guì; Cinnamomum cassia) has the greatest effect. Research has shown that adding cinnamon to diet can help to lower the glucose level. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cinnamon on the glucose level in blood. This was a Randomized clinical trial in which 70 Patients with type II diabetes were assigned randomly two groups (35 in cinnamon and 35 in placebo group). The groups were matched in terms of body mass index (BMI), HbAlc and fasting blood sugar (FBS). Patients were treated with cinnamon and the placebo group was treated with placebo in addition to their routine treatment for 60 days. FBG levels and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients on the first day, and 1 and 2 months after treatment were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and paired t-test in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).16 software. The mean levels of FBS before, and 1 and 2 months after the intervention were 174 ± 59, 169 ± 43 and 177 ± 45; respectively. The levels of HbAlc before and after the intervention in the cinnamon group were (8.9 ± 1.7 and 8.9 ± 1.6). There was no significant difference in FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin levels between the two groups (P = 0.738 and P = 0.87, respectively). Results showed that using certain amount of cinnamon for 60 days did not change the glucose level of diabetic patients. So, using cinnamon to type II diabetes patients cannot be recommended and more studies are needed in future. Keywords: Cinnamon, Diabetes, Fasting blood sugar, Herbal medicine Go to: INTRODUCTION Prevalence of diab Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The objective of this study was to determine whether cinnamon improves blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 60 people with type 2 diabetes, 30 men and 30 women aged 52.2 ± 6.32 years, were divided randomly into six groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 consumed 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon daily, respectively, and groups 4, 5, and 6 were given placebo capsules corresponding to the number of capsules consumed for the three levels of cinnamon. The cinnamon was consumed for 40 days followed by a 20-day washout period. RESULTS—After 40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced the mean fasting serum glucose (18–29%), triglyceride (23–30%), LDL cholesterol (7–27%), and total cholesterol (12–26%) levels; no significant changes were noted in the placebo groups. Changes in HDL cholesterol were not significant. CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study demonstrate that intake of 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon per day reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes and suggest that the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases is increased two- to fourfold in people with type 2 diabetes (1). Although the causes of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are multifactorial, diet definitely plays a role in the incidence and severity of these diseases. The dietary components beneficial in the prevention and treatment of these diseases have not been clearly defined, but it is postulated that spices may play a role. Spices such as cinnamon, cloves Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes . Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower  levels of glucose , cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients Continue reading >>

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the inner bark of trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. Reports suggest that this spice has been in use since the time of the Egyptians, as early as 2000 years ago. Cinnamon has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times, apart from its use as a spice and as an embalming and anointing oil. There has been research that indicates that there is a cinnamon and diabetes connection and that type 2 diabetics certainly benefit from consuming cinnamon. It has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in diabetics. Cinnamon has been found effective in medical conditions such as: Muscle spasms Vomiting Diarrhea Infections Common cold Loss of appetite Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease Erectile dysfunction (ED) HIV Multiple sclerosis and Chronic wounds Research into Cinnamon and Diabetes A paper published in Diabetes Care concluded that low levels of cinnamon (1 to 6 grams per day) reduced glucose, triglycerides, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetic subjects. This study also stated that cinnamon could be used by the healthy population to protect themselves from, and prevent, elevated glucose levels and blood lipid levels. Another study that underlined the connection between cinnamon and diabetes was published in Nutrition Research. It found that cinnamon extract improved fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in 66 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. There have been lab-level studies which show that cinnamon extracts may have potent anti-cancer properties. How Does Cinnamon Act? Phytochemical analysis of cinnamon reveals that it has many chemicals which have potent bioactivity. The chemicals contain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-cancer and an Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

People with diabetes often face dietary restrictions to control their blood sugar and prevent complications. Although research is in a preliminary stage, cinnamon may help fight some symptoms of diabetes. It is also unlikely to cause blood pressure spikes, or disrupt blood sugar. So, people with diabetes who miss a sweet pop of flavor may find that cinnamon is a good replacement for sugar. Can cinnamon affect blood sugar? Cinnamon has shown promise in the treatment of blood sugar, as well as some other diabetes symptoms. Research on the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar in diabetes is mixed and in the early stages. Most studies have been very small, so more research is necessary. People with diabetes who are interested in herbal remedies, however, may be surprised to learn that doctors are serious about the potential for cinnamon to address some diabetes symptoms. A 2003 study published in Diabetes Care, compared the effects of a daily intake of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon with a group that received a placebo for 40 days. All three levels of cinnamon intake reduced blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The effects were seen even 20 days after participants were no longer taking cinnamon. A small 2016 study of 25 people, published in the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, found that cinnamon may be beneficial for people with poorly controlled diabetes. Participants consumed 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks. The result was a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine had a different result. The study, which used a more reliable method, had slightly more participants, at 70. The researchers found that 1 g of cinnamon per day for 30 days and 60 days offered no improvements in blo Continue reading >>

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

How Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar And Fights Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease characterized by abnormally high blood sugar. If poorly controlled, it can lead to complications like heart disease, kidney disease and nerve damage (1). Treatment often includes medications and insulin injections, but many people are also interested in foods that can help lower blood sugar. One such example is cinnamon, a commonly used spice that's added to sweet and savory dishes around the world. It provides many health benefits, including the ability to lower blood sugar and help manage diabetes. This article tells you everything you need to know about cinnamon and its effects on blood sugar control and diabetes. Cinnamon is an aromatic spice derived from the bark of several species of Cinnamomum trees. While you may associate cinnamon with rolls or breakfast cereals, it has actually been used for thousands of years in traditional medicine and food preservation. To obtain cinnamon, the inner bark of Cinnamomum trees must be removed. The bark then undergoes a drying process that causes it to curl up and yield cinnamon sticks, or quills, which can be further processed into powdered cinnamon. Several different varieties of cinnamon are sold in the US, and they are typically categorized by two different types: Ceylon: Also called "true cinnamon," it's the most expensive type. Cassia: Less expensive and found in most food products containing cinnamon. While both types are sold as cinnamon, there are important differences between the two, which will be discussed later in this article. Cinnamon is made from the dried bark of Cinnamomum trees and is generally categorized into two varieties. A quick glance at cinnamon's nutrition facts may not lead you to believe that it's a superfood (2). But while it doesn't contain a lot of vitamins or minerals, it d Continue reading >>

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